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  • As more information becomes available about the Equifax breach scandal, U.S. consumers are still searching for answers on whether they are vulnerable to identity fraud.  So that is why WSB Radio, Channel 2 Action News, and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and Consumer Adviser Clark Howard teamed up Monday morning to answer your questions.   Clark Howard was joined by Channel 2 Action News anchor Craig Lucie LIVE in Team Clark Howard's Consumer Action Center. They fielded questions and talked about the breach for over an hour.   The Facebook Live of the event reached more than 400,000 people worldwide:
  • Amazon is working on its first wearable device: a pair of smart glasses that would allow its virtual assistant Alexa to be summoned any time, anywhere, according to the Financial Times. >> Amazon baby registry emails baffle customers who aren't expecting The device, which would tether wirelessly to a smartphone, is designed to look like a regular pair of spectacles so it can be worn comfortably and unobtrusively, sources told the Times. >> Read more trending news A bone-conduction audio system would allow the wearer to hear Alexa without having to insert headphones into their ears. Read more here.
  • Hurricane Maria is bearing down on the Caribbean and is set to pass over much the same area devastated by Hurricane Irma nearly two weeks ago. >> Read more trending news 
  • Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a surprise guest speaker Wednesday evening during services for the Jewish new year in Washington, telling worshippers she believes being Jewish helped her empathize with other minority groups. Ginsburg spoke mostly about her Jewish faith, acknowledging that the Jewish justices who have served on the court have shared some similar views, which she linked to their Jewish heritage. 'If you are a member of a minority group, particularly a minority group that has been picked on, you have empathy for others who are similarly situated,' she said during about 20 minutes of answering questions from attorney Kenneth Feinberg. Ginsburg spoke at services for Rosh Hashana, the Jewish new year, which began Wednesday evening and which Jews continue observing Thursday. The service she attended was organized by Sixth & I, a historic synagogue that hosts a range of Jewish and cultural events. Worshippers were not told ahead of time that she'd be appearing. Ginsburg is one of three Jewish justices on the nine-member Supreme Court. Justices Stephen Breyer and Elena Kagan are also Jewish, and Breyer spoke at services organized by Sixth & I last year. The 84-year-old Ginsburg, who has served on the court since 1993, noted that she is now the longest-serving Jewish justice. She also spoke about Jewish values that have guided her. 'The Jewish religion is an ethical religion. That is, we are taught to do right, to love mercy, do justice, not because there's gonna be any reward in heaven or punishment in hell. We live righteously because that's how people should live and not anticipating any award in the hereafter,' Ginsburg told the audience. Ginsburg also talked about what she called the 'Great Yom Kippur controversy,' when in 1995 the court had been scheduled to hear arguments on Yom Kippur, the holiest day on the Jewish calendar. Ginsburg said what finally persuaded Chief Justice William Rehnquist not to hold arguments was when Ginsburg and Breyer, then the only two Jewish justices on the court, told Rehnquist that some lawyers who had been practicing for their arguments for weeks would be asked to choose between their religion and arguing. 'That sold him,' Ginsburg said. Since then, the court has not heard arguments on Jewish holy days, she said. Last year, when the first day of the Supreme Court's term fell on the Jewish new year, the three Jewish justices were absent and the court's short session consisted largely of admitting new attorneys to the Supreme Court bar. The Supreme Court will open its next term Oct. 2. The justices are scheduled to tackle cases involving President Donald Trump's travel ban, a clash between gay rights and religion, partisan advantage in redistricting, the privacy of certain cellphone records and sports betting. 'There's only one prediction that's entirely safe about the upcoming term, and that is: it will be momentous,' Ginsburg said earlier Wednesday at Georgetown University's law school. The Georgetown audience included Trump's daughter Tiffany Trump, a Georgetown law student.
  • Many people online said they received notices Tuesday about gifts being purchased for their Amazon baby registry. Problem is, in many cases the customers who received the notices said they don't have a registry – or a baby on the way. “We are notifying affected customers,' an Amazon spokeswoman said Tuesday evening. 'A technical glitch caused us to inadvertently send a gift alert e-mail earlier today. We apologize for any confusion this may have caused.” >> Read more trending news “Hello Amazon Customer,” the screengrab of one of the messages read. “Someone great recently purchased a gift for your baby registry! You can visit your Thank You List to easily track all gifts purchased. PS: Remember some Gifters like when it’s still a surprise.” There was a box where users could click through to a 'Thank You List.' Many people who received the message tweeted about it with the hashtag #amazonbaby. Read some of the tweets below:
  • The Latest on President Donald Trump and the Russia probe (all times local): 11:50 p.m. The social media company, Twitter, says it will meet with a Senate committee investigating Russia's interference in the presidential election. The company says in a statement Wednesday evening that its representatives will meet with staff of the Senate Intelligence committee next week. The committee has been scrutinizing the spread of false news stories and propaganda on social media during the election. The panel has heard from Facebook. The committee's top Democrat, Sen. Mark Warner of Virginia, had said he wanted to hear from Twitter as well to learn more about the use of fake accounts and bot networks to spread misinformation. Twitter says it has been cooperating with the panel's investigation and is working to strengthen its efforts to combat activities that violate its terms of service. ___ 5:50 p.m. Special counsel Robert Mueller's team of investigators is seeking information from the White House related to Michael Flynn's stint as national security adviser and about the response to a meeting with a Russian lawyer that was attended by President Donald Trump's oldest son, The Associated Press has learned. Mueller's office has requested a large batch of documents from the White House and is expected to interview at least a half-dozen current and former aides in the coming weeks. Lawyers for the White House are in the process of trying to cooperate with the document requests. Though the full scope of the investigation is not clear, the information requests make evident at least some of the areas that Mueller and his team of prosecutors intend to look into and also reveal a strong interest in certain of Trump's actions as president. A person familiar with the investigation who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity to discuss an ongoing investigation said investigators want information on, among other topics, a June 2016 meeting at Trump Tower that Donald Trump Jr. attended with a Russian lawyer as well as on the administration's response to it.