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    As Hurricane Maria was ravaging the island of Puerto Rico, House Speaker Paul Ryan said during a Wednesday visit to Florida that he expects the Congress will vote on more disaster relief money next month, as federal agencies deal with the aftermath from three major hurricanes – Harvey, Irma and Maria. “I’m sure that we’re going to do another, what we call a supplemental, sometime in October, once we have a full assessment of what is needed,” the Speaker said, after spending the day looking at storm damage across Florida. Earlier this month, lawmakers approved $15.3 billion in extra aid for Hurricane Harvey; while that money was expected to allow for initial aid for victims of both Harvey and on Hurricane Irma relief, the expected damage from Hurricane Maria will mean an even bigger drain on federal emergency budget accounts. The Speaker’s comments came after Ryan toured damaged areas in south Florida, which included a flight from the U.S. Coast Guard over the Florida Keys. Thank you @SpeakerRyan for taking the time to visit South Florida & the #FLKeys to assess the damage left behind by #Irma #KeysRecovery pic.twitter.com/qNb105UJid — Rep. Carlos Curbelo (@RepCurbelo) September 20, 2017 “From Marathon to Key West, it was really pretty extensive damage,” Ryan said, noting that he was familiar with the area from fishing trips he has made to Florida in the past. “It was really astounding, the kind of damage that is done, not just to the ecosystem, but also to the homes and the structures,” the Speaker added. Ryan was accompanied not only by local lawmakers from Florida, but also by the Chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-NJ), who would be in charge of any extra aid package in the House. . @SpeakerRyan says he expects Congress will have to pass another hurricane aid package in October. — Cristina Marcos (@cimarcos) September 20, 2017 “We will work together to make sure that the necessary federal resources are in place for the rebuilding,” the Speaker said. “We will be there every step of the way.” No estimates have been given on how much the Congress will have to pony up in terms of federal aid for Harvey, Irma and Maria; the Governor of Texas at one point said he thought his state might need over $100 billion from Uncle Sam, and the costs will certainly climb with damage to Puerto Rico from Maria.
  • Citing the deaths of seniors at a nursing home in Florida after Hurricane Irma, and a viral photograph of seniors in waist deep water at a facility in Texas during Hurricane Harvey, a U.S. Senate committee was urged on Wednesday to support stronger regulations for nursing homes and assisted living facilities to better protect older Americans during hurricanes, floods, and other emergencies and natural disasters. “We need generators to support medical needs and air conditioning to cool reasonable temperatures, as well as fuel,” said Kathryn Hyer, a professor at the University of South Florida’s School of Aging Studies. Hyer said her past research has shown that it is better for seniors at nursing homes and assisted living facilities to shelter-in-place, rather than go through evacuations during hurricanes – as she told the Senate Special Committee on Aging that better planning is needed for those facilities. Sen. Committee on Aging holds hearing after 9 people died in #Florida nursing home during #Irma, and viral pic in #Texas during #Harvey pic.twitter.com/djqUH7YeZb — Anna Wiernicki (@AnnaEWiernicki) September 20, 2017 “Nursing homes and assisted living must be built in places that minimize flooding, and they have to be built to standards that allow administrators to shelter-in-place, if at all possible,” Hyer added. The Senate hearing came as finger pointing continued in the Sunshine State over who was to blame for the deaths of nine seniors at a Broward County, Florida nursing home, after Hurricane Irma caused widespread power outages in southern Florida. “Older citizens should not suffer for days and then die, in the unbearable heat,” said Sen. Robert Casey (D-PA). “So many of us were both outraged and enraged when we saw what happened in Florida,” Casey added. After Irma: Scott says nursing home ‘failed…basic duty’ in deaths https://t.co/LTl0ERLMKi — The Palm Beach Post (@pbpost) September 20, 2017 “We must ask ourselves, can we better protect the most vulnerable members of our communities?” asked Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME). The hearing was convened as Hurricane Maria was bearing down on the U.S. island territory of Puerto Rico. “We have a big one going right now,” President Donald Trump said of the storm during a meeting at the United Nations with the King of Jordan. “I’ve never seen winds like this – in Puerto Rico,” Mr Trump said. “You take a look at what’s happening there, and it’s just one after another. 'We have a big one going right now,' Pres. Trump says of Hurricane #Maria. 'I've never seen winds like this.' https://t.co/bkGCCZkSRT pic.twitter.com/GenWk9nF3i — ABC News Politics (@ABCPolitics) September 20, 2017 “But I think we are doing a good job,” the President added about the federal response. Overnight, the storm raced just to the south of St. Croix, sparing that part of the U.S. Virgin Islands from serious devastation, though widespread damage was being reported. Back to the east, there were still few reports from the island of Dominica, which suffered a direct hit from Maria on Monday night. With communications down, amateur radio operators in contact with the island were getting reports of major damage on Dominica.
  • In his first address to the United Nations, President Donald Trump vowed that the United States would ‘totally destroy’ North Korea if that regime seeks to use its nuclear weapons against America or its allies, as Mr. Trump singled out North Korea, Iran, Syria, Cuba and Venezuela in a wide ranging address to the U.N. General Assembly. In blunt terms, the President zeroed in on North Korea, labeling it a “depraved” regime, referring to its leader as “Rocket Man,” as Mr. Trump said the United Nations must join together to stop the nuclear ambitions of Kim Jong Un. “Rocket Man is on a suicide mission for himself and his regime,” Mr. Trump declared, making clear the U.S. would not ignore provocations by the Pyongyang regime. “If it is forced to defend itself or its allies, we will have no choice but to totally destroy North Korea,” the President said. Pres. Trump on North Korea: 'Rocket Man is on a suicide mission for himself and for his regime.' https://t.co/a3VGUhtpiN pic.twitter.com/zHLl83PjLk — ABC News Politics (@ABCPolitics) September 19, 2017 On Iran, Mr. Trump said the Iran nuclear deal brokered by the Obama Administration and other American allies was an “embarrassment,”
  • Still working on recovery and relief efforts in Texas after Hurricane Harvey and Florida after Hurricane Irma, federal officials were looking at the chance of even more damage in the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico, as rapidly intensifying Hurricane Maria seemed to be taking dead aim at an area in the Caribbean which just experienced major troubles from Irma earlier this month. “Maria is likely to affect Puerto Rico as an extremely dangerous major hurricane,” the National Hurricane Center reported in its evening update about the progress of the storm, noting that “all indications are that rapid intensification is continuing.” As President Donald Trump approved an emergency declaration for the Virgin Islands, the forecast showed Maria moving near those islands, and then directly over Puerto Rico by Wednesday with winds of 150 mph, a scenario that could well mean more damage for the U.S. government to deal with. Martinique and Dominica look to get hit first with Major Hurricane Maria. Then true tragedy if it hits US Virgin Islands…again. — Rob Carlmark (@rcarlmark) September 18, 2017 “Maria’s impact on the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico may well make Maria the third Category 4 billion-dollar hurricane for the U.S. this year, in addition to Harvey and Irma,” wrote storm expert Dr. Jeff Masters, on his hurricane blog at Weather Underground. The forecast was especially bad news for the Virgin Islands, which already suffered major damage during Hurricane Irma . With the hurricane heading straight for those American possessions in the northeastern Caribbean, several major airlines joined on Monday to run last minute ‘mercy flights’ from St. Croix to the U.S. mainland. The Tourism Commissioner of the Virgin Islands said the free flights on JetBlue to Orlando, Delta to Atlanta, and American to Miami had all quickly filled to capacity, as people looked to get out of areas that were already suffering from Irma’s damage. “We are trying to accommodate passengers (priority is given to persons with medical needs, pregnant women, the elderly and women with young children)” said Commissioner Beverly Nicholson-Doty, who also had praise for several major cruise ship lines, which also took people away from the Virgin Islands in recent days. Hurricane #Maria up to 130-mph or Category 4 (950 mb central pressure) … satellite suggests that's conservative. Cat 5 signature. pic.twitter.com/CNORNCjxni — Ryan Maue (@RyanMaue) September 18, 2017 In Puerto Rico, the Governor and other officials were warning residents to find adequate shelter, as the outer bands of Maria were expected to start impacting that island on Tuesday, after hitting other islands in the Caribbean. While the long range forecast was unclear on whether Maria might threaten the East Coast of the United States, it seems very clear that extra disaster relief will be needed in the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico, making this an even more expensive year in terms of hurricane relief for Uncle Sam.
  • With the clock ticking down on a special expedited legislative procedure that avoids a Senate filibuster, Republicans are trying to rally support for a new plan that’s designed to make major changes in the Obama health law, in hopes of mustering 50 votes for the bill before the end of September. “Doing nothing is not an option,” says Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-LA), one of prime movers – with Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) – behind a bill that was unveiled just last week, but has picked up support from most Republicans in the Senate. “We are giving the power over health care to the states, not DC,” Cassidy said, labeling his plan a “fundamentally different approach to health care than Obamacare.” We need to return the power back to states and patients. https://t.co/LX75Zh3NPL — Bill Cassidy (@BillCassidy) September 15, 2017 So far, the White House has not put a full court press on behind the legislation, as this week, President Trump will be focused mainly on the gathering of the United Nations General Assembly in New York. “As I have continued to say, inaction is not an option,” the President stated in a written statement issued last week. “I sincerely hope that Senators Graham and Cassidy have found a way to address the Obamacare crisis,” Mr. Trump added. The same few Senators who resisted earlier GOP health care bills are again in the spotlight, as Republicans can’t afford to lose more than two of their 52 Senators. Already, one has made clear, he is not on board with the new Graham-Cassidy plan. #GrahamCassidy sales pitch: if you like your Obamacare you can keep your Obamacare. No thanks. — Senator Rand Paul (@RandPaul) September 15, 2017 “I can’t support a bill that keeps 90 percent of Obamacare in place,” said Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY), who argues that the Graham-Cassidy plan “is not repeal or replace, it is more Obamacare Lite.” Other GOP Senators on the fence about this plan include Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME), and Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) – both of them joined with Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) to torpedo the GOP ‘skinny’ health care bill earlier this summer, when McCain dramatically voted against in a session that ran past midnight. Like other GOP plans, Graham-Cassidy does not ‘repeal and replace’ the Obama health law, as much of the underlying architecture is left in place by the bill. The plan would zero out the penalties under the individual and employer mandates, phase out a few of the taxes enacted under the Obama health law, and most importantly – it block grants money to the states, and allows them to figure out the best way to help individuals get health insurance. “States would have significant latitude over how the dollars are used to best take care of the unique health care needs of the patients in each state,” backers say. If Republican Senators Rand Paul, Lisa Murkowski, and Susan Collins vote against the Graham-Cassidy Obamacare repeal bill, it will not pass. — Krishan Patel (@IAmKrishanPatel) September 15, 2017 Democrats started to mobilize their opposition over the weekend, worried that Republicans just might be able to thread the needle and get something done before September 30, when authorization under “budget reconciliation” runs out. “This week we need to be focused on defeating the Graham-Cassidy bill. It would end the Affordable Care Act,” said Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA). “They won’t stop until the end of September,” said Sen. Brian Schatz (D-HI). “We cannot stop until the end of September.” The reconciliation bill remains on the Senate calendar; Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell could force a vote at anytime to re-start debate on health care, and bring up the Graham-Cassidy bill. If the Senate were to approve the plan, it’s thought that the House could still vote on it after September 30 – but no changes would be allowed to the bill.
  • As the House finished work this past week on next year’s funding for the federal government, approving a package of eight different different spending bills, one thing noticeably absent from the debate on the House floor was a successful push to make new cuts in next year’s budget, as efforts to make deeper spending reductions were routinely rejected by a coalition of both parties. It was the first time since 2009 that the House had approved all 12 funding bills before the start of new fiscal year – but none of those plans have yet to reach the Senate floor – as the Congress continues to find it difficult to do the yearly job of passing appropriations bills before October 1. The outcome had conservative groups grinding their teeth, wondering where all the plans had gone for real budget cuts in the federal government. “The House has failed to meet this challenge,” the Heritage Foundation complained about the spending details approved by the House for 2018, arguing the Congress should instead buckle down, “cut wasteful programs and reduce the federal deficit.” There was such an opportunity on the House floor, as members of both parties had the chance to offer amendments to the package of eight spending bills. But amendments designed to make cuts were not destined to be winners on the floor of the House. Some examples: + A plan from Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL) to get rid of money to support long distance routes on Amtrak was defeated 293-128. + An amendment from Rep. Tom McClintock (R-CA) to reduce spending on the “Essential Air Service” program by $150 million was defeated 280-140. + A two percent cut in the budget for the Department of Housing and Urban Development from Rep. Glenn Grothman (R-WI) was defeated 280-140. + Another plan from Grothman to reduce Economic Assistance offered under U.S. foreign aid programs was rejected 307-105. + A plan from Rep. Ralph Norman (R-SC) to reduce the EPA budget by $1.8 billion was defeated 260-151. + An amendment from Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC) to cut positions and funding at the Mine Safety Health Administration by 10 percent failed on a vote of 238-178. $20,165,466,677,134.71 (+) #NationalDebt — National Debt Tweets (@NationalDebt) September 15, 2017 + From Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN), a one percent overall cut to the spending bill for Labor, Health and Human Services and Education programs was defeated 260-156. + A 1 percent across-the-board cut offered by Blackburn to Interior spending programs was defeated 248-156. + A 10 percent cut in general administrative and departmental expenses for agencies in the Financial Services budget was defeated 241-166. + A 5 percent cut in the budget of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms was defeated 313-98. + A 2 percent cut in certain programs at the Education Department was defeated 285-131. + A plan to cut $99 million from the budget of the National Labor Relations Board was defeated 241-175. Those are some of the highlights of efforts by GOP lawmakers to make cuts – they just did not have anywhere near the votes to knock such money out of these spending measures. That outcome was noticed by some. Frank, after you're done with @realDonaldTrump's lawn, head over to House Appropriations. They could use some cuts too! pic.twitter.com/ZDQjOGUNL6 — Greg Moore Jr. (@VoteMooreUS) September 15, 2017 On the flip side, one can find dozens of amendments that were approved by the full House, which increased funding of certain programs – and they came from both parties. A few examples: + From Rep. Brian Mast (R-FL), an extra $1.5 million to continue research on human impact of contaminated seafood. + From Rep. Darren Soto (D-FL), $500,000 more for the Grassroots Source Water Protection Program. + A bipartisan amendment approved a $7 million increase for “Assistance to Small Shipyards” + Democrats added $2 million more for the Public Housing Capital Fund at HUD. + Rep. Steve Knight (R-CA) added $100 million for the Community Development Fund at HUD. The House-passed spending bills now go to the Senate, where they are unlikely to get final action any time soon. A temporary budget kicks in on October 1, and runs out in early December – so, after Thanksgiving, look for a giant catch-all spending bill to fund the federal government.
  • A day after President Donald Trump seemed to muddy the waters on a possible legislative deal with Democrats in Congress on the future of young illegal immigrant “Dreamers,” the White House on Friday promised that officials would clearly set out in the next seven to ten days what items Mr. Trump wants to see on immigration enforcement in any deal on the DACA program. “The President supports the DACA program and supports making a deal on that, but again, that has to include that massive border security,” said White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. On Thursday, the President said he was not for ‘amnesty’ for any of the Dreamers – the White House today made the argument that since DACA is just a temporary way to prevent people from being deported, the issue of a pathway to citizenship for those in the program is not on the table. POTUS 'supports the DACA program & supporting making a deal on that,' but 'that has to include that massive border security,' @PressSec says pic.twitter.com/DgEovEO5A7 — CBS News (@CBSNews) September 15, 2017 As to what the White House wants in exchange for DACA, Sanders rattled off a series of items, but said a final list would be set out soon by the Trump Administration. Some of those included: + An end to sanctuary cities + Expedited removal of illegal immigrants + More immigration judges + Reforms in legal immigration (the RAISE Act) Democratic leaders had thought their agreement with the President included his support for the “Dream” Act – which would allow those younger illegal immigrants to reach U.S. citizenship, after a series of hurdles – but that seems to be in limbo at this point. Democrats also weren’t sure what to make of the President’s Thursday statements on DACA, which rapidly moved from ‘no deal,’ to ‘fairly close’ to a deal, to ‘no amnesty.’ Trump's timeline on #DACA: 9/5 am DACA is dead 9/5 pm DACA is dead, unless Congress acts 9/13 pm DACA deal = done 9/14 am 'No deal' 9/15 ??? — Raul M. Grijalva (@RepRaulGrijalva) September 15, 2017 President Trump has set a deadline for action in early March, but lawmakers in both parties say an earlier resolution would be a better choice.

News

  • As more information becomes available about the Equifax breach scandal, U.S. consumers are still searching for answers on whether they are vulnerable to identity fraud.  So that is why WSB Radio, Channel 2 Action News, and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and Consumer Adviser Clark Howard teamed up Monday morning to answer your questions.   Clark Howard was joined by Channel 2 Action News anchor Craig Lucie LIVE in Team Clark Howard's Consumer Action Center. They fielded questions and talked about the breach for over an hour.   The Facebook Live of the event reached more than 400,000 people worldwide:
  • A sweet -- and very large -- feline could be classified as a Hurricane Irma victim, but instead she’ll probably become famous as she goes viral.  Faye, weighing in at a whopping 24 pounds, was dropped off at the Jacksonville Humane Society in Jacksonville, Florida, and is up for adoption Wednesday. >> Read more trending news A Facebook post about the cat went up Tuesday night and had already been shared more than 600 times by Wednesday.  According to the shelter, the 12-year-old cat is an attention hound and needs a loving home where someone will help her cut back on food and treats.  “Faye loves attention and likes when you scratch right above her nubby tail,” the post said. “She will need a loving home to help her lose weight at a slow and steady pace outlined by our veterinarian.” Faye was brought in after Hurricane Irma, but her owner contacted them before the storm for help, so shelter officials aren’t totally blaming the storm. Those interested in adopting Faye or other pets at the North Florida shelter can visit the Jacksonville Humane Society website. 
  • Want to request a credit from Comcast for missed Xfinity cable, internet and phone service due to Hurricane Irma? The company has set up two ways to ask for it. Customers can either call its customer service line at 1-800-391-3000 or fill out a short online form at xfinity.com/florida-form. The online way is likely faster, since it doesn’t require customers to log in. >> Read more trending news Those without internet at home may be able to use their smartphone or find a place with available Wi-Fi.  A Comcast employee will respond, and credits may take one to two billing cycles to be posted to your account, according to the company. As of Monday, there were nearly 900,000 cable customers without service in Florida. That number includes a number of internet provider, not just Comcast. A Comcast spokeswoman said Tuesday that 97 percent of its customers have had their service restored. AT&T’s U-verse cable service has also been hit hard by outages, but the company has been mum about whether they will offer credits. It’s not mentioned on AT&T’s Irma support page. When reached for comment about the issue last week, a spokeswoman never responded to Palm Beach Post. “Unfortunately our equipment that services internet and TV took a hit,” a post on the AT&T support forum said. Due to the nature of the equipment, it can take time to replace or repair depending on the damaged caused by the water. Also power may not have been restored to our equipment as residential areas take priority. Just because you have power at your home, does not mean power has been restored in other areas that push the signal to your home. “We do have many crews out there trying to restore service to get everyone back up. I know this is a stressful time for everyone out there. Please know that AT&T is doing what we can to help. “ U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, D-Fla., asked the CEOs of America’s largest cell service and cable providers last week to waive late fees and issue rebates for victims of Irma. Hardly any of the companies responded. Comcast is also waiving a variety of fees, including late payment fees, early termination fees and fees for requipment that has not been returned.
  • President Donald Trump has made airlines' longtime goal of privatizing air traffic control a key part of his agenda to boost America's infrastructure. But his prospects for closing the deal with Congress appear slim. A House bill that would put the aviation industry in charge of air traffic control has repeatedly stalled and prospects appear even worse in the Senate, where there has been no effort to take up the issue. While the White House and airline lobbyists have pushed for privatization, there has been fierce opposition from private pilots, corporate aircraft owners and others who fear they will have to pay more to use the system and would lose access to busy airports. Airlines have pushed for getting the government out of air traffic operations for decades and seemed to have the brightest prospects after meeting with Trump early this year. Trump embraced the idea as part of his overall plan to boost infrastructure — a big part of his campaign promise to create jobs. While Trump has offered few other specifics about his overall infrastructure plans, he put the spotlight on air-traffic privatization at a White House infrastructure event in June. Three weeks later, the House transportation committee approved a bill by its chairman, Pennsylvania Republican Bill Shuster, to spin off air traffic control from the Federal Aviation Administration and place it under the authority of a private, non-profit corporation run by aviation interests, including airlines. But the bill still hasn't come to the House floor. Trump's special assistant for infrastructure policy, D.J. Gribbin, told an airline industry conference last week that House leaders are planning a vote in early October. But the bill's supporters acknowledge the vote would have already happened if there was enough support to pass it. 'We're working on it,' Rep. Paul Mitchell, R-Michigan, told reporters. 'We don't have all the votes yet.' Lawmakers in both parties have expressed concern about Congress losing oversight of such an important, traditionally government-run function. The handover of about 300 airport towers and other flight tracking centers would be one of the largest transfers of U.S. government assets ever. About 35,000 workers would be affected. Sen. Bill Nelson of Florida, the senior Democrat on the Commerce Committee, which oversees the FAA, called the House plan 'a classic case of a costly solution looking for a problem.' 'It's an idea that went nowhere in the Senate last year and is destined to meet the same fate this year,' he said. Airlines say the FAA has shown itself incapable of executing its plan to use technology to transform America's air traffic system, saving time, fuel and money and increasing the system's capacity to handle more planes as air travel grows. Part of the FAA's problem is that the vagaries of the government's budget process have limited the agency's ability to commit to long-term contracts and raise money for major expenditures. Placing the system under a corporation that can borrow money against future revenue would lead to greater efficiency and more reliable funding, airlines say. Many countries have separated air-traffic operations from their safety regulator in recent years, with most creating government-owned corporations, independent government agencies or quasi-governmental entities. The House bill is modeled after Canada's air traffic corporation, Nav Canada, the only clearly private nonprofit air-traffic corporation. Privatization supporters say Nav Canada has made smart decisions that have enabled it to adopt more advanced technology while reducing fees to airlines and other users. But opponents fear privatization will give airlines too much power over the aviation system. 'This is a monopolization bill,' said Rep. Ralph Abraham, R-Louisiana. The corporation's 13-member board, as outlined in the bill, 'is definitely stacked to favor the big airlines,' he said. The airline industry has faced the lobbying muscle of private pilots and other 'general aviation' users in the past, and lost. People who can afford their own plane tend to be well-heeled and know how to get lawmakers' attention. They are an especially important constituency in rural districts and states, where people depend more on small aircraft. Opponents also have enlisted the support of several aviation heroes, including astronaut Jim Lovell, the commander of Apollo 13. Retired Capt. Chesley 'Sully' Sullenberger, the pilot who landed an airliner in the Hudson River without the loss of a single life made a commercial for opponents, saying not to trust 'the keys to the kingdom' to 'the people who make your airline seats smaller.' White House and airline officials have pushed hard, but say offers to adjust the bill to address opponents' concerns have been rebuffed. General aviation groups have told bill proponents they fear that any protections in the legislation would be inadequate. 'We could literally never get past that concept,' said the White House's Gribbin.
  •   It’s one of a woman’s worst fears, to attend a party or event and run into someone else wearing the same thing. >> Read more trending news That not only happened at a wedding on Saturday, it happened to six women, who all showed up at the reception wearing the same dress.  One of the women, Debbie Speranza, posted a photo of the women on Facebook saying, “Imagine the odds.”  'My cousin and I walked into the reception and saw each other [in the same dress] and started laughing, but then another walked in … then another one … and another one,” Speranza told the Telegraph. The group was photographed with the bride at one point and actually looked like they could be her bridesmaids. The dress was sold by Forever New for $160, and Speranza had some advice for the company. “You really should start a bridal registry so that your customers can inquire whether anyone else has purchased one of your dresses for the same event,” she said on Facebook.  
  • When it comes to scary things in the Upside Down, it turns out that a Demogorgun is no match for intellectual property lawyers. >> Read more trending news “The Upside Down,” A “Stranger Things”-themed pop-up bar in Chicago, has been hit with a cease-and-desist letter from Netflix after it was found in violation of intellectual property laws because it never received Netflix’s blessing. But Netflix didn’t sent just any cease-and-desist letter. No, they got in on the spirit of the show with a nerdy, yet firm, directive for the bar’s owners: The bar, designed by the same folks that created the Windy City’s Emporium Arcade Bar, debuted on Aug. 18 in Logan Square. According to Eater Chicago, patrons of “The Upside Down” can order show-themed drinks, such as “Eleven’s Eggo’s,” served with a waffle wedge; and a drink named for the Demogorgun, the show’s big monster. Fans of the show’s theme music from Austin band S U R V I V E can indulge in a few kegs of Goose Island’s GI5-5538, a red ale that was brewed specifically for the band.  The bar is also decorated with a ton of “Stranger Things” memorabillia, including a huge mural of Eleven, the Byers family couch, Christmas lights (complete with the alphabet), an A/V rig and some props designed to look like the Hawkins Energy Department. Check out photos of the bar here. As one might guess, having all of this out in the open without permission would be cause for some concern from Netflix. The bar was originally scheduled to close after a six-week run, with plans for an extension if it was profitable. As it stands now, the bar will close on Oct. 1. Nevertheless, this looks like a win-win for the bar and the streaming service. The second season of “Stranger Things” debuts next month, and the letter does leave future pop-ups open to consideration, so both groups get publicity. So, Chicago, start pedaling your bikes over to the bar before the portal to the Upside Down closes. And Austinites, you’ve got 10 days to get yourself a flight to Chicago.