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Gen Politics
Gingrey introduces SAFE Act in Congress
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Gingrey introduces SAFE Act in Congress

Gingrey introduces SAFE Act in Congress
Georgia Congressman Phil Gingrey says the measure would allow states to set their own requirements for proof of citizenship when someone registers to vote.

Gingrey introduces SAFE Act in Congress

Within hours of Monday’s US Supreme Court decision striking down an Arizona law that required registered voters to prove their citizenship, Georgia Congressman Phil Gingrey introduced what he entitled the SAFE Act.

“SAFE stands for Securing America’s Fair Elections Act,” Gingrey explained in an interview with WSB’s Pete Combs.

“That measure would allow states to set their own requirements for proof of citizenship when someone registers to vote,” Gingrey said.

As for concerns that it might supress voters – a concern raised by a majority of justices in the Supreme Court’s 7-2 vote, Gingrey was adamant.

“You’ve got to show who you are to get a marriage license, to get on an airplane as I do every week, to buy cigarettes and alcohol, to buy something with a credit card – this is not suppression,” Rep. Gingrey said.

Instead, he contended the SAFE Act would combat what Gingrey said is a rising number of voter fraud cases.

“In fact, in 2009, I think there were over 200. In 2010, it was up to 234. And even last year, it was over 200. So, for anybody to say it doesn’t exist…and that’s just in the state of Georgia,” said Gingrey.


Gingrey says his bill has wide support in both houses of Congress and he hopes will move quickly toward passage.

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  • Channel 2 Action News has confirmed DeKalb County Sheriff Jeff Mann returned to work Monday morning, following a 40-day governor-ordered suspension. The suspension was linked to findings from an investigation into Mann's arrest on May 6 in Piedmont Park. Mann is charged with indecency and obstruction for exposing himself in Piedmont Park before running from an Atlanta Police Department bicycle officer. Mann's case is still pending in Atlanta Municipal Court, where his attorney has entered a motion to dismiss the case based on double jeopardy. Mann is asking the court to consider his suspension, which was ordered by Gov. Deal, as punishment served in the case. As of Friday, Judge Crystal Gaines had not yet made a ruling on the case. The case is scheduled to be heard Thursday afternoon, following a reset earlier this month. Since June 13, Capt. Ruth Stringer has served as interim sheriff of DeKalb County. RELATED STORIES: Judge appoints interim sheriff in place of DeKalb Sheriff Jeffrey Mann Sheriff accused of indecency headed to trial DeKalb sheriff suspends himself after indecency arrest Investigation into sheriff's alleged indecent acts to continue DeKalb sheriff ran after being caught in park for indecent acts, police say Residents say sheriff's arrest one more dark cloud on DeKalb County Her appointment was made by a DeKalb County Superior Court judge following the governor's executive order. That appointment also followed a self-imposed suspension in late May that Mann announced to his staff via an internal memo. Voter reaction Some DeKalb voters seemed indifferent to news of Mann's return Monday. 'When you have that much power, you can kind of do what you want to do,' said Niya Johnson. 'That's how it's working nowadays in today's society, unfortunately.' Johnson never expected Mann's career to suffer from the incident. 'He can do whatever he wants and still go back to work,' she said. 'That's how that works.' Kailand Davis's only problem with the case is Mann's request for it to be dismissed from Atlanta Municipal Court. 'Nah, see, that's him trying to get above the law. He needs to face charges,' said Davis. 'Everyone gets suspended for doing something at work, but this is a criminal offense he committed so he should trialed (be tried) just like anyone else.' DeKalb resident Lisa Keys said she found it difficult to explain the situation to her children. 'What if you have your kids there at the park and they see something like that? That's not fair to those kids. That's something he should have did (in) personal time. That's a personal thing.' Mann entered a plea of not guilty to both charges prior to the case reset last month.
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