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  • As more information becomes available about the Equifax breach scandal, U.S. consumers are still searching for answers on whether they are vulnerable to identity fraud.  So that is why WSB Radio, Channel 2 Action News, and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and Consumer Adviser Clark Howard teamed up Monday morning to answer your questions.   Clark Howard was joined by Channel 2 Action News anchor Craig Lucie LIVE in Team Clark Howard's Consumer Action Center. They fielded questions and talked about the breach for over an hour.   The Facebook Live of the event reached more than 400,000 people worldwide:
  • A California high school is enduring harsh criticism after parents say educators took a lesson on slavery too far. >> Read more trending news Eighth-grade students at Whitney High School in Cerritos reportedly were forced to role-play as slaves while teachers pretended to be ship captains. Before the students entered the classroom, the teacher bound their hands with masking tape and made them lie on the floor and watch a clip from “Roots,” the San Francisco Gate reported. >> On Rare.us: Social media backlash prompts video game creators to edit out this controversial scene from slavery education game One mother took to Facebook to complain about the activity. She said she received an email from the school explaining the exercise and claims that when she complained, the department chair “mansplained the activity” to her and said “he thinks it’s great and will continue.” She also attached emails from the school in which an administrator said the exercise “is from a recognized supplier of curriculum” and that “the exercise is not designed to demean anyone, but to give them a glimpse into something that is very difficult for young people to wrap their minds around.” >> See the post here On Monday, school officials announced that they were removing the lesson from the curriculum, CBS Los Angeles reported. Students interviewed by the station said that they agree with the decision to pull the activity. Multiple outlets have requested a comment from Whitney High School but have received no response.
  • Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a surprise guest speaker Wednesday evening during services for the Jewish new year in Washington, telling worshippers she believes being Jewish helped her empathize with other minority groups. Ginsburg spoke mostly about her Jewish faith, acknowledging that the Jewish justices who have served on the court have shared some similar views, which she linked to their Jewish heritage. 'If you are a member of a minority group, particularly a minority group that has been picked on, you have empathy for others who are similarly situated,' she said during about 20 minutes of answering questions from attorney Kenneth Feinberg. Ginsburg spoke at services for Rosh Hashana, the Jewish new year, which began Wednesday evening and which Jews continue observing Thursday. The service she attended was organized by Sixth & I, a historic synagogue that hosts a range of Jewish and cultural events. Worshippers were not told ahead of time that she'd be appearing. Ginsburg is one of three Jewish justices on the nine-member Supreme Court. Justices Stephen Breyer and Elena Kagan are also Jewish, and Breyer spoke at services organized by Sixth & I last year. The 84-year-old Ginsburg, who has served on the court since 1993, noted that she is now the longest-serving Jewish justice. She also spoke about Jewish values that have guided her. 'The Jewish religion is an ethical religion. That is, we are taught to do right, to love mercy, do justice, not because there's gonna be any reward in heaven or punishment in hell. We live righteously because that's how people should live and not anticipating any award in the hereafter,' Ginsburg told the audience. Ginsburg also talked about what she called the 'Great Yom Kippur controversy,' when in 1995 the court had been scheduled to hear arguments on Yom Kippur, the holiest day on the Jewish calendar. Ginsburg said what finally persuaded Chief Justice William Rehnquist not to hold arguments was when Ginsburg and Breyer, then the only two Jewish justices on the court, told Rehnquist that some lawyers who had been practicing for their arguments for weeks would be asked to choose between their religion and arguing. 'That sold him,' Ginsburg said. Since then, the court has not heard arguments on Jewish holy days, she said. Last year, when the first day of the Supreme Court's term fell on the Jewish new year, the three Jewish justices were absent and the court's short session consisted largely of admitting new attorneys to the Supreme Court bar. The Supreme Court will open its next term Oct. 2. The justices are scheduled to tackle cases involving President Donald Trump's travel ban, a clash between gay rights and religion, partisan advantage in redistricting, the privacy of certain cellphone records and sports betting. 'There's only one prediction that's entirely safe about the upcoming term, and that is: it will be momentous,' Ginsburg said earlier Wednesday at Georgetown University's law school. The Georgetown audience included Trump's daughter Tiffany Trump, a Georgetown law student.
  • Special counsel Robert Mueller's team of investigators is seeking information from the White House related to Michael Flynn's stint as national security adviser and about the response to a meeting with a Russian lawyer that was attended by President Donald Trump's oldest son, The Associated Press has learned. Mueller's office has requested a large batch of documents from the White House and is expected to interview at least a half-dozen current and former aides in the coming weeks. Lawyers for the White House are in the process of trying to cooperate with the document requests. Though the full scope of the investigation is not clear, the information requests make evident at least some of the areas that Mueller and his team of prosecutors intend to look into and also reveal a strong interest in certain of Trump's actions as president. A person familiar with the investigation who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity to discuss an ongoing investigation said investigators want information on, among other topics, a June 2016 meeting at Trump Tower that Donald Trump Jr. attended with a Russian lawyer as well as on the administration's response to it. A statement provided to journalists in July, which the White House has said Trump had a hand in drafting, said the meeting was primarily to discuss a disbanded program that used to allow American adoptions of Russian children, but emails released days later by Trump Jr. show that he arranged the encounter with the expectation of receiving damaging information about Hillary Clinton. Investigators also are interested in White House actions involving Flynn, such as what officials knew about an FBI investigation into him and how they responded to word that his Russian contacts had been scrutinized. Flynn was forced out as national security adviser in February after White House officials concluded he had misled them about his conversations with the Russian ambassador to the United States. Former Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates has said she warned White House counsel Don McGahn in January that that deception left Flynn and the White House in a compromised position, and that she expected McGahn to take action. That conversation took place two days after FBI agents had interviewed Flynn. But Flynn was not asked to resign until several weeks later, following news reports that said he had discussed sanctions during the transition period with the ambassador, Sergey Kislyak. Former FBI Director James Comey has said that Flynn was facing an FBI criminal investigation 'of his statements in connection with the Russian contacts and the contacts themselves. And so that was my assessment at the time.' Comey has also said that Trump, in a private Oval Office encounter in February, told him that he hoped he would end the FBI investigation into Flynn. Trump has denied that. Comey's own firing in May is also under investigation for potential obstruction of justice, and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who appointed Mueller as special counsel and oversees his work, has been questioned by investigators about the circumstances of that event, according to people familiar with the matter. A spokesman for the special counsel's office declined to comment. Mueller was appointed in May to investigate potential coordination between Russia and the Trump campaign, and potential crimes arising from that probe. Investigators in July raided the home of Trump's former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, in a search of tax and banking records and in recent months have served subpoenas related both to Manafort's business dealings and those of Flynn. Mueller's team of investigators includes prosecutors with experience in organized crime, national security and complex financial fraud cases. The primary prosecutor on the White House investigation is James Quarles, who came with Mueller from the WilmerHale law firm and was involved in Watergate prosecutions. Among the aides expected to be interviewed in coming weeks are McGahn, former press secretary Sean Spicer and former chief of staff Reince Priebus. On Wednesday, Twitter confirmed that it would meet next week with staff of the Senate Intelligence committee, which has been scrutinizing the spread of false news stories and propaganda on social media during the election. The panel has heard from Facebook. The committee's top Democrat, Sen. Mark Warner of Virginia, had said the committee wanted to hear from Twitter as well to learn more about the use of fake accounts and bot networks to spread misinformation. 'Twitter deeply respects the integrity of the election process, a cornerstone of all democracies, and will continue to strengthen our platform against bots and other forms of manipulation that violate our Terms of Service,' the company said in a statement. ___ Follow Eric Tucker on http://www.twitter.com/etuckerAP
  • Nine elderly patients died after being kept inside a nursing home that turned into a sweatbox when Hurricane Irma knocked out its air conditioning for three days, even though just across the street was a fully functioning and cooled hospital. From the perspective of Florida Gov. Rick Scott and relatives of those at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, criminal charges are warranted. But under Florida law, a prosecution might be difficult. Two of three ex-state prosecutors contacted by The Associated Press had doubts as to whether Dr. Jack Michel, the home's owner, or any of his employees will be charged. All agreed that any criminal prosecutions will hinge on whether the nursing home staff made honest mistakes or were 'culpably negligent.' Florida defines that as 'consciously doing an act or following a course of conduct that the defendant must have known, or reasonably should have known, was likely to cause death or great bodily injury.' Hollywood police and the state attorney's office are investigating. The home has said it used coolers, fans, ice and other methods to keep the patients comfortable — and that might be enough to avoid prosecution. 'There is a difference between negligence, which is what occurs when you are not giving a particular standard of care vs. culpable negligence,' said David Weinstein, a former state and federal prosecutor now in private practice. 'So if they are doing everything humanly possible given the circumstances and this all still happened it may be negligent and provide the basis for a civil lawsuit, but not enough for criminal charges.' Retired University of Florida law professor Bob Dekle, who prosecuted serial killer Ted Bundy as an assistant state attorney, said he doubted charges would be brought. 'I would rather be a defense attorney on this case than a prosecutor,' Dekle said. 'There are some cases that are better tried in civil court than criminal and this might be one of them.' Former U.S. Attorney Kendall Coffey disagreed. 'Given the magnitude of the tragedy and the apparent availability of a hospital 50 yards away, prosecutors are not going to accept that this was an unavoidable tragedy,' he said. Gary Matzner, the nursing home's attorney, said in a statement that Michel and the staff are cooperating with the investigation. 'The center and its employees and directors are devastated by this tragedy,' he said. Irma reached Broward County on Sept. 10. The home has said a felled tree took out a transformer that powered the air conditioner, but it maintained power otherwise. It said it reported the loss to Florida Power & Light and was promised repairs in the next two days, but the utility never arrived. Scott's office said that over those two days, home administrators Jorge Carballo and Natasha Anderson were in contact with the state about the failed air conditioner but never said the situation had become dangerous. The state said they were told to call 911 if needed. On the afternoon of Sept. 12, the home borrowed portable air coolers from Memorial Regional Hospital, the trauma center across the street. Later that night, home administrators said, a physician's assistant checked the patients and none were overheated and the building temperature never exceeded 80 degrees. Under state law, the temperature was not supposed to exceed 81 degrees. In the early hours of Sept. 13, the deaths began. Three 911 calls were made before 6 a.m., causing Memorial staff to rush across the street to offer assistance. Doctors and nurses said they found the home's staff working to cool the patients, although they and police have said the facility was very hot. No temperature reading has been released as police have said that is part of the investigation. Three people died on the home's second floor and six succumbed at the hospital, including a 93-year-old man who died Tuesday. The state said four of the deceased had body temperatures between 107 (41.6 Celsius) and 109 (42.7 Celsius) degrees. Dr. Randy Katz, the hospital's emergency director, said last week it was impossible to say whether any of the dead would have survived if they had gotten to the hospital hours earlier. The number of deaths and injured could be a determining factor in whether to bring charges. Weinstein said prosecutors could argue that after the first patients became seriously ill, administrators should have known an evacuation was necessary. Dekle agreed the number could be key. 'The more dead victims there are in a homicide case, the less likely a jury is to find reasonable doubt,' Dekle said.
  • GAME OF THE WEEK: No. 17 Mississippi State at No. 11 Georgia: The first matchup between the SEC's two sets of Bulldogs since 2011 features a pair of undefeated teams. This is the first time Georgia and Mississippi State have met when both teams were ranked. Mississippi State is coming off a 37-7 blowout of No. 25 LSU, which was ranked 12th at the time of the game. Mississippi State is the only team in the nation to rank in the top 10 in both scoring offense and scoring defense. Georgia has beaten Mississippi State nine straight times. Mississippi State quarterback Nick Fitzgerald directs an offense that scores an SEC-leading 47.7 points per game , while Georgia has an exceptional defense that already silenced Notre Dame's potent rushing attack this season. MATCHUP OF THE WEEK: Alabama rushing attack vs. Vanderbilt run defense: Vanderbilt has allowed the fewest points per game (4.3) and yards per game (198.3) of any Football Bowl Subdivision team. That defense clearly faces its toughest test Saturday against the top-ranked Crimson Tide. Alabama averages 6 yards per carry with a backfield that includes quarterback Jalen Hurts and running backs Damien Harris and Bo Scarbrough. Hurts has a team-high 312 yards rushing and has gained 8.7 yards per carry. Hurts has run for over 100 yards in each of the Tide's last two games. This should be a busy day for Vanderbilt linebacker Emmanuel Smith, who had a team-high 12 tackles in the Commodores' victory over Kansas State last week. NUMBERS GAME: No. 20 Florida is seeking to beat Kentucky for the 31st straight time this week. Florida's 30 straight victories over the Wildcats represent the longest active winning streak by any team in an uninterrupted annual series. The NCAA record is owned by Notre Dame, which beat Navy 43 straight times from 1964-2006. ... Texas A&M's 45-21 victory over Louisiana-Lafayette last week marked the first time the Aggies ever had four true freshmen score touchdowns in one game. The touchdowns came from Kellen Mond, Jhamon Ausbon, Jacob Kibodi and Camron Buckley. ... LSU has won 48 straight nonconference home games heading into Saturday's game with Syracuse. Harvard owns the NCAA record with 55 straight nonconference home wins from 1890-95. ... Vanderbilt has outscored its first three opponents 63-7 in the first half. ... Auburn's defense is allowing just 3.18 yards per play to lead the nation. Ranking second is Mississippi State (3.34) and third is Vanderbilt (3.44). UPSET WATCH: Florida is a 2 ½-point favorite at Kentucky and obviously has history on its side in this annual series, but the Wildcats arguably have looked more impressive thus far. Kentucky is coming off a 23-13 victory at South Carolina , while Florida is still missing nine suspended players. Kentucky is seeking its first victory over Florida since 1986 and its first 2-0 start in SEC competition since 1977. IMPACT PERFORMER: Tennessee running back John Kelly leads the SEC with 349 yards rushing and also has 16 catches to match the second-highest total in the conference. He's averaging 180 all-purpose yards per game to rank sixth among all FBS players . _____ AP Sports Writers Steve Megargee in Knoxville, Tennessee, and David Brandt in Jackson, Mississippi, contributed to this story. _____ More college football coverage: http://collegefootball.ap.org and www.Twitter.com/AP_Top25 .