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  • Great Britain lowered its security threat level from “critical” to “severe” on Saturday, Prime Minister Theresa May said. >> Read more trending news Earlier, police hunting a suspected network behind Salman Abedi, the bomber who killed 22 people on Monday night during a concert in Manchester, said they had made two further arrests overnight as they closed in on other possible cell members, Reuters reported.  As a result, soldiers who have been assisting police would be withdrawn from Britain's streets at midnight on Monday. 'A significant amount of police activity has taken place over the last 24 hours and there are now 11 suspects in custody,' May said. May cautioned, however, that the lesser threat is still a dangerous one. 'The public should be clear about what this means. A threat level of severe means an attack is highly likely,” she said. “The country should remain vigilant.' The threat assessment has returned to the level it was at prior to the Manchester attack. In Manchester, events planned around the spring bank holiday will go ahead with additional security, including a significant number of armed officers, police said. British officers do not usually carry guns, CNN reported. Events include the Manchester Games, the Great Manchester Run, and a stadium show by bands including The Courteeners, all of which are likely to attract big crowds. This weekend also marks the start of Ramadan, the holiest month of the Muslim calendar, CNN reported.    
  • A Cobb County mother was jailed after her 5-year-old son said she beat him with a belt and a broom, hit him in the head and stomped on his stomach. Nakeisha Lashay Logan of Mableton faces first-degree child cruelty, battery and family violence charges in connection with an alleged May 17 attack. The boy, whose name was not released because he is a juvenile victim, said during a forensic interview that he tried to hide under the bed to avoid the “terrible” beating but Logan beat him with a broom and threw a box of toys at him, a magistrate court warrant states. RELATED: ‘I’m going to rape you’ man allegedly tells mother in front of kid Mom, friend jailed after child suffers broken bones, electrical burns Babysitter charged after 5-month-old breaks 4 bones After the box of toys hit the child in the shoulder, Logan grabbed his head and smashed it repeatedly on the floor, according to the warrant.  The warrant adds that Logan stomped on the child's stomach, making him feel nauseous.  The warrant doesn’t state who called police, but by the time an officer arrived the boy’s bleeding cheek had scabbed. His face was still red and swollen, Officer Sydney Tschappat wrote. Police took the boy to a nearby hospital and arrested Logan. She was being held in the Cobb County Adult Detention Center on a $50,000 bond. In other news:
  • Police say a metro Atlanta couple locked the woman's 86-year-old mother in her room and used furniture to block the door closed. Katie Son and her husband are both charged with cruelty to an elderly person. Officers say 86-year-old Bong Le managed to escape out a front window. She was found a couple of blocks away, wrapped in a blanket and sitting under a tree. Investigators say she smelled like urine and feces. Her daughter and son-in-law, who are now out on bond, told Channel 2's Tony Thomas that they were just trying to protect her from herself. 'Did you lock your mom up?' Thomas asked. 'No. No sir,' Son replied. Gwinnett police say they found tables, chairs and other items stacked high against the door of the downstairs bedroom in the home. 'It looked quite unusual,' Cpl. Michele Pihera said. But Son said it was all to keep her mother safe. She said when she and her husband went to work each day at a Hall County nail salon, her mother couldn't be trusted alone in the house. 'They told our officers that the reason they had stacked up the furniture was to prevent the mother from going into the kitchen to access the stove or access any kitchen utensils,' Pihera said. TRENDING STORIES: Police search for teens accused of setting off fireworks inside grocery store Watch your step! Snakebites on the rise World falling in love with Georgia father's letter to Ariana Grande Deputies still have questions. 'It's very possible they were trying to prevent her from getting into the food or any kind of items to eat,' Pihera said. She says the state of the room was disturbing. 'They found human feces and what looked like human urine that looked like it had been smeared into the carpet or never even cleaned up,' she said. She said that, combined with the furniture, led to the arrests. 'You combine the lack of access to food and water and the living conditions and that's what led our detectives to take out warrants for their arrests,' Pihera said. Neighbors didn't want to talk about what happened, but said they recognized Le as the woman who didn't really have a memory and would get lost easily. She's now in the hospital. Her daughter and son-in-law have been ordered not to go near her.
  • Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly said Sunday he's considering banning laptops from the passenger cabins of all international flights to and from the United States. That would dramatically expand a ban announced in March that affects about 50 flights per day from 10 cities, mostly in the Middle East. The current ban was put in place because of concerns about terrorist attacks. The ban prevents travelers from bringing laptops, tablets and certain other devices on board with them in their carry-on bags. All electronics bigger than a smartphone must be checked in. Kelly was asked on 'Fox News Sunday' whether he would expand the ban to cover laptops on all international flights into and out of the U.S. His answer: 'I might.' The current U.S. ban applies to nonstop U.S.-bound flights from 10 international airports in Amman, Jordan; Kuwait City, Kuwait; Cairo; Istanbul; Jeddah and Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Casablanca, Morocco; Doha, Qatar; and Dubai and Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. About 50 flights a day, all on foreign airlines, are affected. Earlier this month, there were reports that the Trump administration would broaden the ban to include planes from the European Union, affecting trans-Atlantic routes that carry as many as 65 million people a year. U.S. officials have said that initial ban was not based on any specific threat but on longstanding concerns about extremists targeting jetliners. 'There's a real threat,' Kelly said, adding that terrorists are 'obsessed' with the idea of downing a plane in flight, 'particularly if it's a U.S. carrier, particularly if it's full of mostly U.S. folks. It's real.' Kelly said that the U.S. is going 'to raise the bar for, generally speaking, aviation security much higher than it is now, and there's new technologies down the road, not too far down the road, that we'll rely on. But it is a real sophisticated threat, and I'll reserve making that decision until we see where it's going.' While Kelly referred to 'a real sophisticated threat,' the Trump administration's spending plan for the budget year that begins Oct. 1 would make significant cuts to airport security programs.
  • On Tuesday night, a neighbor watched out the window of her condo west of the city as official-looking men wearing powder-blue latex gloves searched Lewis Bennett’s car and questioned him as he stood nearby. Neighbors say they last saw Isabella Hellmann weeks before Bennett, her newlywed husband, says he left with her on a two-week romantic sailing jaunt through the Tropics — one that ended with Bennett being rescued at sea and Hellman missing. >> Read more trending news Bennett said his catamaran struck something while he slept and that he came topside to find the boat sinking and no trace of his new wife — a 41-year-old real estate broker, his wife of just three months and the mother of the couple’s 9-month-old daughter. The Coast Guard and the FBI both have confirmed they are jointly conducting a “missing person investigation” into Hellmann’s disappearance. The Palm Beach Post has been unable to reach Bennett, 40, a dual British-Australian citizen with few ties to Florida and an enigmatic past. Hellmann’s family spoke briefly at the start of a Coast Guard search that would cover four days and 6,600 miles, an area nearly three times the size of Palm Beach County. Since then, relatives have declined to speak with The Post. >> Related: Husband to start own search for wife presumed missing at sea What happened in those evening hours on the high seas, about 70 miles southeast of Key West, remains, in large part, a mystery. Authorities do know some details, but haven’t yet revealed them. They’re remaining silent about other pieces of the puzzling disppearance. On May 17, the night before the U.S. Coast Guard called off the search, neighbor David Mayer said last week he approached Bennett to express his concern and sympathy. “He said, ‘Yeah. I’m going to be leaving for England. I’ve got to move on with my life,’ ” Mayer recalled. “I said, ‘What about the baby?’ He stopped and said, “Oh. I guess I’ve got to take her with me, too.’” Read more here.
  • Pole sitter Scott Dixon was knocked out of the Indianapolis 500 on Sunday by a terrifying crash that saw his car fly over the car of Jay Howard and land atop the inside safety fence, where it split in two amid sparks and flames. Dixon's car was shredded by the retaining wall , but the tub of the car remained intact and the 2008 champion was able to climb out on his own to a roar from the crowd. He walked to a waiting ambulance while the race was placed under red flag and crews began to clean up debris scattered over hundreds of feet. Howard also was checked at the infield car center and released. 'Just a little beaten up there. It was definitely a rough ride,' Dixon said. 'I'm just bummed for the team, man. We had a great shot. We had gotten a little loose but they had dialed it in.' It's been a rollercoaster trip to Indianapolis for Dixon, a New Zealander who turned the fastest qualifying laps since 1996 to land on the pole. But that same night, Dixon was waiting in a drive-thru line at a nearby Taco Bell with three-time winner Dario Franchitti when he was held up at gunpoint. Little did he know it wouldn't be his only frightening incident of the week. Howard blamed the incident on Ryan Hunter-Reay. He'd run out of fuel earlier in the race and was already a couple of laps down when Hunter-Reay tried to get around him. Howard said that forced him to the top of the track, and the British driver for Schmidt Peterson Motorsports wound up in the outside wall. That impact sent Howard across the track, where Dixon had nowhere to go. 'We were just out there trying to pick up some laps and Hunter-Reay got a run on me,' Howard said. 'I lifted, trying to be a nice guy. He comes right over on me and the rest is happy.' Dixon's car went airborne and flipped over before landing on the retaining barrier, where the impact punched a hole in the safety fencing. A photographer who was positioned at that point on the track ducked just in time as the car came apart; he was checked by safety crews and was OK. Helio Castroneves was following them and barely escaped the carnage. 'It's tough,' Dixon said. 'You make those decisions, which way to go. You're hoping Jay is going to stay against the wall. I already had picked that way to go. There was nowhere else to go to avoid him. It's just a wild ride. You hold on and believe in the safety progress we've made.' Howard was making only his 13th career IndyCar start and his first since 2011, and that led Dixon team owner Chip Ganassi to question the series' eligibility rules. The spectacular crash followed an incident involving Sebastien Bourdais during qualifying weekend, when he wiggled twice going through the same corner and hit the wall. The tub of his car collapsed and Bourdais was left with a fractured pelvis, hip and ribs. Bourdais, who was at the track Sunday, joined Franchitti in visiting Dixon at the care center. Dixon was among the heavy favorites to win his second Indianapolis 500 this weekend. He had been fast through practice before landing on the pole, and his Honda-powered ride had him near the front of the field when the crash occurred on Lap 54. 'It was,' Dixon said, 'a wild ride.