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Crime & Law
Hotel evacuated after man walks in carrying multiple firearms, police say
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Hotel evacuated after man walks in carrying multiple firearms, police say

Hotel evacuated after man walks in carrying multiple firearms, police say
Photo Credit: WSBTV.com
Authorities were called to a hotel in Henry County, Georgia, on Monday, Jan. 22, 2018, after a man was spotted with multiple guns, officials said.

Hotel evacuated after man walks in carrying multiple firearms, police say

Police in Henry County searched a hotel in McDonough on Monday morning after getting reports of an armed man at the hotel.

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News

  • Fires in Paulding County that destroyed five homes, damaged 14 others and injured one person early Sunday started as the result of arson, officials said.  A person of interest is in custody on charges unrelated to the fires on Rosemont Court in Hiram, said Glenn Allen, spokesman for the state insurance and safety fire commissioner's office. The identity of that woman will be released when she is formally charged with arson, he said.  The initial fire started about 3:25 a.m. in the kitchen and dining room of one home in the Greystone Subdivision before spreading to others, according to Allen. Multiple families were displaced as a result of the fires, Paulding County fire spokesman Lt. Steve Mapes said. “Representatives from the Red Cross established a disaster operation at the neighborhood community center,” Mapes said.  The status of the injured person was unknown. In other news:
  • Latest updates, results, photo galleries and stories from the 2018 Winter Olympic Games.
  • A Republican state senator who shouted at University of Idaho students in the Capitol to lobby for a birth control bill on Monday now faces an ethics complaint after a tweet from an account presenting as the lawmaker's directed students to discuss 'killing babies' with a Democratic colleague. State Sen. Maryanne Jordan filed the complaint against Republican state Sen. Dan Foreman. 'It's one thing to disagree with policy, it's another thing to position something like that against another lawmaker,' Jordan said in response to the tweet Monday. 'This type of behavior is beneath the Idaho Senate.' Ethics complaints against lawmakers are typically anonymous, so while Jordan confirmed she is filing a complaint, she did not disclose many details what would be included in the complaint. After the complaint was filed, the roughly year-old unverified Twitter account was temporarily deleted. It was reactivated briefly to state it was not affiliated with Foreman. A message seeking comment with the account manager was not immediately returned. As of Monday night, the account remained deleted. Foreman did not immediately return requests for comment. A dozen students, who had traveled nearly 300 miles (483 kilometers) from the Moscow campus, were in Boise for a scheduled meeting with Foreman to lobby for a bill that would allow women to receive up to a 12-month supply of prescribed birth control and promote better sex education on college campuses. Foreman abruptly canceled the meeting Monday morning. The group left a note and condoms in his office before moving onto other scheduled meetings with lawmakers from northern Idaho regions. Later that day, the Republican from Moscow passed the students in a hallway and several people recorded him shouting, 'Abortion is murder.' 'I'm a Roman Catholic and a conservative Republican. I think what you guys are doing stinks,' Foreman says on the video. The students were not at the Capitol to talk about abortion, said Planned Parenthood of Greater Washington and North Idaho public affairs director Paul Dillon. They were present to encourage lawmakers to vote in favor of the birth control and sex education bill. Other meetings with state lawmakers were peaceful, Dillon said, even if the lawmakers disagreed with the students' talking points. Sen. Bob Nonini, a Republican from Coeur d'Alene, waved a rosary while talking to students about abstinence but did not shout or demean them, Dillon said. Dillon described Foreman as 'completely unhinged.' 'Even if you disagree with what we have to say, there's no excuse for that kind behavior,' Dillon said in a phone interview. 'He was being a bully.' The unverified Twitter account sent several tweets concerning Planned Parenthood and abortion in the hours that followed. This isn't the first time Foreman has been recorded having an outburst. Last year, bodycam video from the Latah County Sheriff's Department showed Foreman swearing and shouting insults with an unseen and unidentified male on Sept. 14 — the first day of the county fair in Moscow. 'Go straight to hell, you son of a bitch,' Foreman can be heard saying in the footage. The deputy then asked Foreman to move along. Foreman has also faced scrutiny over an email response to a constituent's concerns over climate change. Foreman called global warming 'nonsense' and said it was a scam used by left-wing fanatics to raise taxes. ___ This story has been updated to reflect that the tweet that sparked the ethics complaint came from an unverified account.
  • Survivors of a Florida high school shooting that left 17 dead are channeling their anger and sadness into action. More than 100 students from the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School are heading to Florida's capital to push state lawmakers to do something about gun violence. They also plan to attend what they hope will be a massive march on Washington next month. Their newfound activist roles don't leave a lot of time for studying, but the students say this cause is more important than academics — at least for now. Former student Nikolas Cruz has been charged with 17 counts of murder in the Wednesday afternoon shooting.
  • The man allegedly behind the fatal Florida high school shooting apparently has a disturbing past that is coming to light. A school fight that was captured on camera a little more than a year ago is the latest development. >> Click here to watch Authorities said 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz killed 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland. Cruz was formerly a member of the school’s JROTC program before being expelled. >> Florida school shooting: Teacher of the year's emotional Facebook post goes viral A September 2016 video shared by ABC News shows Cruz wearing a white shirt and khakis while fighting with other students. Cruz was reportedly handed a two-day suspension following the incident. >> Family who took in Nikolas Cruz: 'We just didn't know' According to ABC, the fight was one of five documented incidents that caused school administrators to expel Cruz, mandating his transfer to another high school in February 2017. >> WATCH: Florida school shooting survivor Emma Gonzalez slams politicians, NRA in emotional speech Another incident that reportedly contributed to Cruz’s expulsion was his alleged fight with his ex-girlfriend’s new boyfriend. Cruz was allegedly abusive toward her before they broke up. >> Read more trending news  The massacre at the high school marked the 25th U.S. school shooting in which someone was killed since the 1999 shooting at Columbine High School.
  • From the confines of his golf club, President Donald Trump offered support for a limited strengthening of federal background checks on gun purchases Monday while staying largely mum in the last few days about the victims of the Florida school massacre and the escalating debate about controls on weapons. One side of that debate was represented outside the White House as dozens of teens spread their bodies across the pavement to symbolize the dead and call for stronger gun controls, a precursor to a march in Washington planned next month by survivors of the Parkland school shooting and supporters of their cause. At his Florida club just 40 miles from a community ravaged by the shooting that left 17 dead last week, Trump gave a nod toward a specific policy action, with the White House saying he had spoken Friday to Sen. John Cornyn, a Texas Republican, about a bipartisan bill designed to strengthen the FBI database of prohibited gun buyers. Spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders qualified the support, stressing that talks continue and 'revisions are being considered,' but said 'the president is supportive of efforts to improve the federal background check system.' The main action Trump has taken on guns in office has been to sign a resolution blocking an Obama-era rule designed to keep guns out of the hands of certain mentally disabled people. The president has voiced strong support for gun rights and the National Rifle Association. The bipartisan background check legislation would be aimed at ensuring that federal agencies and states accurately report relevant criminal information to the FBI. It was introduced after the Air Force failed to report the criminal history of the gunman who slaughtered more than two dozen people at a Texas church. The White House statement comes as shooting survivors and other young people press for more gun control in a rising chorus of grief and activism. Their 'March for Our Lives' is planned March 24 in Washington. Ella Fesler, 16-year-old high school student in Alexandria, Virginia, was among the students at the 'lie-in' in front of the White House. She said it was time for change, adding: 'Every day when I say 'bye' to my parents, I do acknowledge the fact that I could never see my parents again.' But previous gun tragedies have not produced action in Congress. After the Las Vegas massacre in the fall, Republicans and Democrats in Congress talked about taking a rare step to tighten the nation's gun laws. Four months later, the only gun legislation that has moved in the House or Senate instead eases restrictions for gun owners. Kristin Brown, co-president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, said the measure Trump discussed with Cornyn would help to enforce existing rules but would not close loopholes permitting loose private sales on the internet and at gun shows. She's pressing for a ban on assault-type weapons and for laws enabling family members, guardians or police to ask judges to strip gun rights temporarily from people who show warning signs of violence. 'We need a comprehensive system,' Brown said. 'One of these isn't enough.' Trump, who visited first responders and some victims Friday, has focused his comments on mental health, rather than guns. The White House says the president will host a 'listening session' with students and teachers this week and will discuss school safety with state and local officials. But they have offered no further details on who will attend those sessions. Trump spent most of his weekend at his private Palm Beach estate, Mar-a-Lago. White House aides advised against golfing too soon after the shooting. But on President's Day, the avid golfer headed to his nearby golf club. The White House did not immediately answer questions about whether he was playing golf. President Barack Obama took heavy criticism in 2014 when he went golfing during a vacation just minutes after denouncing the militants who had beheaded an American journalist. He later regretted playing golf so soon after the killing. Trump watched cable television news during the weekend and groused to club members and advisers about the investigation of Russian election meddling. In a marathon series of furious weekend tweets from Mar-a-Lago, Trump vented about Russia, raging at the FBI for what he perceived to be a fixation on the Russia investigation at the cost of failing to deter the attack. ___ Associated Press writer Jonathan Lemire contributed to this report.