ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
58°
Clear
H 58° L 35°
  • cloudy-day
    58°
    Current Conditions
    Clear. H 58° L 35°
  • clear-night
    48°
    Evening
    Clear. H 58° L 35°
  • clear-night
    37°
    Morning
    Clear. H 64° L 43°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Cameras on Cobb school buses soon to double

The number of Cobb County School buses equipped with camera systems that record stop arm violators will soon double. Officials said it is confirmation that the experimental program is helping to make a remarkable dent in the number of drivers who fail to stop when school kids are crossing the street.

Approximately 1,000 buses carry Cobb County public school students to and from class each day. It is the riskiest part of their school experience. But with the advent of camera systems on school buses, that trip has become a lot safer, according to Cobb Police.

“I think we’re down to about 450-500 violations per day from 1,600 violations per day two years ago,” said Lt. Hawk Hagebak, who commands traffic operations at the department.

The system of seven cameras is mounted on 101 Cobb school buses, according to Hagebak. The County is installing them on 98 additional buses. When completed, cameras will be on board approximately 20-percent of the entire fleet, he said.

However, they amount to a powerful deterrent because the buses are used on routes where stop arm violations are most frequent, he continued. Once deployed on a particular route, violations in that area soon disappear, Hagebak said.

“It is hard to refute that a violation has taken place,” he said, noting that cameras not only capture vehicles driving past a bus when its stop arm is deployed, but also capture the vehicle’s license tag.

Violations cost drivers $300.00. No points are assessed against a violator’s driving record for a video citation, Hagebak said. That contrasts with stop arm violations witnessed by law officers. In those cases, fines can range up to $1,000.00 and six points against a violator’s driving record.

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

News

  • The body of a 32-year-old man was found Friday morning in south DeKalb County with multiple gunshot wounds, according to police. Detectives, who learned about the body about 9:25 a.m., are working the scene in the 4500 block of Golf Vista Circle, spokesman Lt. Lonzy Robertson told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “The vehicle he is next to may have also been struck by gunfire,” Robertson said. Police have not released the victim’s name, and no one has been arrested in connection with the deadly shooting. “We don’t believe he lives in this area,” Robertson said, “but we won’t release that until we notify next of kin.” Robertson said police are waiting on the medical examiner’s office to determine how long the body had been at that location. This is the second time this week authorities have been called to the scene of a dead body in DeKalb County.  A man was found dead early Tuesday outside an apartment in the 2000 block of Gladeview Parkway near Stone Mountain, police said. The man, believed to be in his late 20s, was dressed for a “construction or industrial” type of job, according to police. He was wearing work boots, work pants and a hard hat. Channel 2 Action News reported that he was shot in the head, and was shot multiple times. MORE: Man wearing work clothes found fatally shot outside DeKalb apartment We’re working to learn more about both shootings. — Please return to AJC.com for updates. In other news:
  • Black ice is to blame for a crash that sent a Fulton County police officer and another driver to the hospital, authorities said. The crash happened about 1 a.m. Friday on Old National Highway and Pleasant Hill Road, according to Fulton police Cpl. Partrena Smith. RELATED: Roads refreeze, travel still dangerous The officer may have a broken arm and the other driver may have a head injury, Smith said. The names and conditions of both drivers have not yet been released. —Please return to AJC.com for updates. In other news:
  • The Minnesota Vikings are the owners of a remarkable victory in last weekend’s NFL divisional playoffs. Now, the team wants to own the nicknames that have been attached to it. >> Read more trending news/ Stefon Diggs’ stunning 61-yard touchdown catch and run on the final play of the game gave the Vikings a 29-24 victory against New Orleans, giving birth to the nicknames “Minneapolis Miracle” or “Minnesota Miracle.” Monday, the Vikings filed for three trademarks for “Minneapolis Miracle” and one for “Minnesota Miracle,” according to filings published Friday by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The Vikings want to own the rights to the nickname on more than 100 items, including cell phone straps, football helmets, charge cards, computer game software, DVDs, compact discs and videotapes, according to the filings. Already, the team is selling a T-shirt with the slogan, “Minneapolis Miracle 1-14-18,” ESPN reported. Diggs began selling shirts licensed by the NFL Players Association with his image and the words “Minneapolis Miracle,” on Wednesday and already has sold more than 1,000 of them online, ESPN reported. It’s not the first sports nickname that has had a trademark application. For example, former Pittsburgh Steelers running back Franco Harris trademarked the phrase “Franco’s Immaculate Reception,” after his last-second catch-and-run for a touchdown off a deflected pass that gave Pittsburgh a 13-7 victory against Oakland in the 1972 playoffs. Riles & Co., the corporate entity of former NBA basketball coach Pat Riley, trademarked the phrase “Three-Peat” in 1989. The Vikings play the Philadelphia Eagles on Sunday in the NFC Championship game.
  • A series of women’s marches, protests and voter registration events are taking place across the country this weekend. This weekend marks the one-year anniversary of President Donald Trump’s inauguration. In 2017, the Women’s March on Washington drew a large crowd that marched in protest of Trump’s election. Women’s marches were held across the country and the world. For 2018, marches and rallies are being held in cities across the country throughout the weekend. There will be a voter registration drive on Sunday in Las Vegas.
  • The snowy mountains and frozen lakes of Rocky Mountain National Park are still accessible to visitors, despite the federal government shutdown.But across the country in New York, the nation's most famous monuments to immigration — the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island — were closed Saturday.The National Park Service oversees both natural wonders and historic landmarks across the nation. The park service's parent agency, the Interior Department, had vowed to keep as many parks and public lands open as possible during the shutdown, which began at midnight Friday on the East Coast.But by mid-day Saturday, the pattern was spotty.The USS Constitution, the 220-year-old warship anchored at Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston, was open, but Boston's Bunker Hill Monument was closed.
  • In Palm Beach, Florida, home to President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate, several hundred people gathered carrying anti-Trump signs as they prepared to march as part of Saturday's planned protests.Across the globe, people hit the streets on the anniversary of Trump's inauguration, marching against his policies and in support of the #MeToo movement against sexual assault and harassment.In Palm Beach, a group of women wearing red cloaks and white hats like the characters in the book and TV show 'The Handmaid's Tale' marched in formation, their heads bowed.Elsewhere around the U.S., people congregated in Chicago; Houston; Richmond, Virginia; and Rhode Island. In Los Angeles, organizers predicted thousands of people, including state officials and celebrities, would march to City Hall.A protest in New York was among more than 200 such actions planned for the weekend around the world. By mid-morning, people gathered in Chicago, Los Angeles, Denver and Raleigh, North Carolina. In Philadelphia, many marchers wore pink cat-ear hats as a show of solidarity, while others carried signs stating opposition to Trump and his policies.In Chicago, thousands of people gathered in Grant Park. Fawzia Mirza drew cheers from the crowd as she kicked off the event with a reference to the partial government shutdown, which began hours earlier.'When the government shuts down, women still march,' she said.She said the event was about channeling women's energy and 'putting that power in the polls.'Earlier Saturday, dozens of activists gathered in Rome to denounce violence against women and express support for the #MeToo movement. They were joined by Italian actress and director Asia Argento, who made headlines after alleging in 2017 she had been sexually assaulted by Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein in the 1990s.The 2017 rally in Washington, D.C., and hundreds of similar marches created solidarity for those denouncing Trump's views on abortion, immigration, LGBT rights and more. Millions of people around the world marched during last year's rallies, and many on Saturday thought about all that's happened in the past year.'I'd be lying if I said that I'm not dispirited and discouraged over having to march yet again to register our opposition to this disastrous first year of the Trump presidency,' said Peggy Taylor, a New York tour guide.She said that last year she felt 'a kind of euphoria' walking through the city with hundreds of thousands of participants.This year, 'the hard reality of what lies ahead of us has sunk in,' she said. 'I know that we have a long slog ahead of us to undo the damage that this man has inflicted.'The Republican president on Friday delivered new support to the anti-abortion movement he once opposed, speaking by video to thousands of activists at the annual March for Life.In New York, scheduled speakers included Ashley Bennett, a Democrat who was elected Atlantic County, New Jersey, freeholder last November. Bennett defeated Republican incumbent John Carman, who had mocked the 2017 women's march in Washington with a Facebook post asking whether the women would be home in time to cook dinner.Among the goals of this year's march are getting more Democrats to run for public office and bolstering voter registration.In Rome, Argento addressed the criticism she received once she spoke up about her abuse.'Women are scared to speak and because I was vilified by everything I said, I was called a prostitute for being raped,' she said at the rally. 'I wonder how women who received such violence would find the courage to come out as I did, when they saw what happened to me, so I am here to assess the necessity of women to speak out and change things.'Argento, who's 42, was strongly criticized by many Italian media and Italian women for not speaking out earlier and was hounded on Twitter with accusations that she sought trouble.Weinstein has apologized for causing 'a lot of pain' with 'the way I've behaved with colleagues in the past,' but he has denied 'any allegations of non-consensual sex.'Last year's march in Washington sparked debate over inclusion, with some transgender minority women complaining that the event seemed designed for white women born female. Some anti-abortion activists said the event did not welcome them.The organizers for the Sunday rally are striving for greater inclusion this year, with Latina and transgender female speakers, said Carmen Perez, another co-chair of the 2017 Washington march. Women in the U.S. illegally, sex workers and those formerly incarcerated are welcome, she said.Linda Sarsour, one of the four organizers of last year's Washington march, said Las Vegas was slotted for a major rally because it's a strategic swing state that gave Democrat Hillary Clinton a narrow win in the presidential election and will have one of the most competitive Senate races in 2018.The rallies also laid the groundwork for the recent movement that brought a reckoning for powerful men accused of sexual misconduct, Sarsour said.'I think when women see visible women's leadership, bold and fierce, going up against a very racist, sexist, misogynist administration, it gives you a different level of courage that you may not have felt you had,' she said.___Lush reported from St. Petersburg, Florida.___This story has been corrected to show that the Chicago event participant's surname is Mirza, not Miza, and that millions of people, not 1 million, marched last year.