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22 amazing fitness, health & happiness TED Talks

If you have access to the Internet, you’ve likely seen one: We’re talking about TED Talks.

These live-recorded videos are inspirational life lessons from experts in fields from architecture to cardiology and everywhere in between brought (for free) to Internet audiences by TED, a non-profit dedicated to “Ideas Worth Spreading.”

There are now thousands of “Talks” on the site — mid-sized videos each with its own “ah-ha!” message or insight. But with so much inspiring to be had, where do you even start looking for innovative talks on fitness, health, and happiness?

To help curate this free, digital resource, Greatist selected 22 Ted Talks that offer something simple and motivating to apply to everyday life. Whether you want to push your workout limits, eat less meat, or stop wasting time at work, these videos can act as starting points for your next small step in the right direction.

Fitness

1. Christopher McDougall: Are We Born to Run?

Using his knowledge of evolution, anthropologist and author Christopher McDougall explains the surprising ways that running helped early humans run their world. McDougall’s explanation of why humans are built to move will inspire you to hit the road.

2. David Blaine: How I Held My Breath for 17 Minutes

You may know David Blaine as the crazy-impressive magician who endured living in a block of ice for 63 hours and balanced standing atop a 22-inch wide pole 100 feet in the air for 35 hours. (No big deal.)  Here, he talks about what it took to train and execute his Guinness World Record-breaking 17 minutes under water — including all of the failure, fighting, and pain that went into it. Blaine is inspirational for how he trained like crazy and push towards breaking through a plateau, no matter the obstacles. (Just be aware — holding your breath for 17 minutes is not recommended.) 

3. Matt Cutts: Try Something New for 30 Days

Matt Cutts, an engineer at Google, explains how trying just one  new thing every day for a month was a fun, rewarding, and eye-opening experience for him. Have you always wanted to try yoga, kickboxing, or maybe golf? Cutts says 30 days is long enough to form a habit and stick with it, but short enough that you won’t go crazy if you eventually dislike it.

For all 22 videos, go to Greatist.com.

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  • The Georgia Bureau of Investigation is investigating a shooting involving an Atlanta police officer in southwest Atlanta. “I can confirm that the GBI has been called in to investigate,” GBI spokeswoman Nelly Miles said.  Both Atlanta police and GBI workers were on the scene of the shooting at an apartment on Bent Creek Way just before 8:30 a.m. Neighbors told Channel 2 Action News the shooting is the third violent incident reported in the area recently. The condition of the person shot was not initially reported.  No other details were released. — Please return to AJC.com for updates. In other news:
  • Election officials say early voting begins Monday in Georgia's 6th Congressional District.   Secretary of State Brian Kemp says voters should contact their county elections offices for specific information on the early voting process. State law requires that polls be open during normal business hours during the early voting period.   Polls also will be open Saturday, April 8.   More than a dozen candidates are competing in the April 18 contest to fill the seat representing many of Atlanta's northern suburbs and formerly held by Tom Price. Price, a Republican, is now secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services.   Georgia requires a so-called 'jungle primary' to fill congressional vacancies. The top two vote-getters, regardless of party, move to a June 20 runoff.
  • A woman fought off a knife-wielding man who broke into her southeast Atlanta home Saturday night. Adrien Gass said she was terrified when the man burst into her home on Memorial Drive and chased her with a knife. 'I said, 'I have money.' He said, 'I don't want no money. I want the car and I want your life.' And I said, 'Not today,'' Gass said. The mother of three told Channel 2's Matt Johnson that she threw a piece of furniture at the intruder, who chased her down the hall. 'I know he's bleeding because I attacked him,' she said. Gass said she locked herself in a bedroom. The attacker kept kicking the door and it hit her in the mouth while she held on to it. 'All my might, yes. I would not let that door go,' she said. Gass said she escaped by jumping out a window and the intruder left with nothing. 'I lifted up the window and pushed out and ran as fast as I could to the neighbor's house,' she said. Atlanta police said just three minutes earlier, a quarter of a mile away on Allendale Drive, someone carjacked a husband and wife at gunpoint. 'He was in the car, got the keys and gone,' Tris Siciginanosaid. Siciginano said the thief stole her husband's car and she believes the two crimes are related. 'It was too much in one night and the descriptions are so close,' she said. Police have not said if the crimes are related, but neighbors said they are staying vigilant. No arrests have been made.
  • The family of an American slain in last week's attack in London expressed gratitude Monday for the kindness of strangers as they insisted some good would come from the tragedy. Kurt W. Cochran from Utah was on the last day of a European trip celebrating his 25th wedding anniversary when he was killed when an attacker mowed down pedestrians on Westminster Bridge before stabbing a police officer in a Parliament courtyard. Cochran's wife, Melissa, suffered a broken leg and rib and a cut head, but is steadily improving. 'So many people have been so kind, and we are deeply touched by their goodness and generosity,' said Melissa Cochran's brother, Clint Payne. 'Your notes, prayers, donations and love have helped us so much.' Attacker Khalid Masood was shot dead by police after his deadly rampage, which police have revealed lasted just 82 seconds. Police believe Masood — a 52-year-old Briton with convictions for violence who had spent several years in Saudi Arabia — acted alone, but are trying to determine whether others helped inspire or direct his actions. Detectives on Monday continued to question a 30-year-old man arrested Sunday and a 58-year-old man arrested shortly after Wednesday's attack. Both were detained in the central England city of Birmingham, where Masood had recently lived. Meanwhile, the British government repeated calls for tech companies to give police and intelligence services access to encrypted messages exchanged by terrorism suspects. Masood used the messaging service WhatsApp just before he went on his deadly rampage. Home Secretary Amber Rudd said Sunday that such services must not 'provide a secret place for terrorists to communicate with each other.' Tech companies have strongly resisted previous calls to create back-doors into encrypted messaging, arguing that to do so would compromise the secure communications underpinning everything from shopping to tax returns to online banking. Rudd is due to hold a previously scheduled meeting with internet companies on Thursday. Prime Minister Theresa May's spokesman, James Slack, said tech firms 'should be helping us more' to prevent terrorism. 'The ball is now in their court,' he said. Slack said that if agreement was not reached with the companies, the government 'rules nothing out,' including legislation.