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The 25 Healthiest Colleges in the U.S.

Used with permission from Greatist.com

Right around this time of year, high school seniors are making some tough decisions -- in just a few short weeks, it'll be time to fill out those enrollment forms. Before picking out dorm decor to suit that new college's colors, check out our list. We've found the 25 schools that create the best environment for leading a fit, healthy, and happy life.

Click the arrows to browse through the top 10 schools in the list and visit Greatist.com to see the complete list of 25.

 Intro 

 

No. 10: Can't stand an overcrowded Zumba session?  >>

 

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News

  • One of three nursing home employees accused of repeatedly ignoring a World War II veteran’s last pleas for help before his death has surrendered to authorities. Wanda Nuckles, 61, of Buford, turned herself in to the DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office on Friday, sheriff’s spokeswoman Cynthia Williams said. RELATED: Nursing home employees indicted in death of neglected World War II vet Nuckles was a licensed practical nurse at the time of the incident four years ago that left James Dempsey, 89, dead in his room at Northeast Atlanta Rehabilitation Center. She no longer has her credentials, Williams said. She is charged with depriving an elder person of essential services and concealing a death.  Nuckles, Loyce Pickquet Agyeman and Mable Turman were recently indicted in the incident. Agyeman and Turman remain at large, Williams said. VIEW: Map of crime in metro Atlanta NEW: Join the discussion at the AJC's Crime & Safety Facebook group Know what’s really going on with crime and public safety in your metro Atlanta community, including breaking news, trial coverage, trends and the latest on unsolved cases. Sign up for the AJC’s crime and safety newsletter delivered weekly to your inbox. In other news:
  • Latest updates, results, photo galleries and stories from the 2018 Winter Olympic Games.
  • Governors say the debate over gun control has changed after the Florida school shooting — a shift helped driven by public outrage and student activists. Republican Gov. Bill Haslam of Tennessee puts it this way: 'There's no question we're in a different environment.' But governors are skeptical that Congress can seize the moment, overcome its partisan divide and enact new gun restrictions. So governors are preparing to take the lead and have states push ahead. The recent shooting in Parkland, Florida, is drawing much of the attention at the National Governors Association meeting in Washington. And school safety and gun violence are expected to dominate the governors' discussions Monday with President Donald Trump at the White House.
  • Police arrested a Florida man Monday after he allegedly broke into a sleeping woman’s home and committed sexual battery. Officers responded to an apartment in an undisclosed West Palm Beach neighborhood about 5 a.m.  Feb. 19 when a woman called and said she woke up to a man kneeling at the foot of her bed and touching her genital area, according to the arrest report. >> Read more trending news  She told officers that she asked the man — who was later identified as 27-year-old Lamarsh Shelly — what he was doing in her house, and he said “your door was open,” the police report states. According to the arrest report, Shelly then asked her if she wanted to have sex and asked her for a cigarette. She gave him a cigarette, and she demanded he leave the apartment. She told officers that she knew him from the neighborhood, and he went by the nickname “Honeycomb.” The woman said Shelly was wearing a black shirt with tan pants, the Palm Beach Post reported. Officers then spoke to another witness who said that she saw Shelly outside of the apartment walking north while smoking a cigarette. Officers located Shelly at 8th Street and Herietta Avenue, where he told officers, “I don’t burglarize and I don’t want sex,” the report states. Shelly later admitted to officers that he walked into the apartment, opened the front door and saw the victim sleeping in her bed, the Palm Beach Post reported. He said that he made noises to wake her up to tell her that her front door was open, but did not mention touching her. Police said children were sleeping in the apartment when the incident occurred. Officers arrested Shelly on charges of sexual battery and burglary. He remains at the Palm Beach County jail on no bond, according to jail records.
  • President Donald Trump says arming teachers as a deterrent against school shootings is 'Up to States.' Trump has promoted the idea of putting 'gun-adept' teachers and staff in schools with concealed firearms to protect students after this month's shooting at a Florida high school killed 17 people. But neither Trump nor the White House has said who would pay to train them. Trump has also called for giving bonuses to educators who volunteer to carry a firearm. Here's his latest tweet: 'Armed Educators (and trusted people who work within a school) love our students and will protect them. Very smart people. Must be firearms adept & have annual training. Should get yearly bonus. Shootings will not happen again - a big & very inexpensive deterrent. Up to States.
  • Investor Warren Buffett says Wall Street's lust for deals has prompted CEOs to act like oversexed teenagers and overpay for acquisitions, so it has been hard to find deals for Berkshire Hathaway. In his annual letter to shareholders Saturday, Buffett mixed investment advice with details of how Berkshire's many businesses performed. Buffett blamed his recent acquisition drought on ambitious CEOs who have been encouraged to take on debt to finance pricey deals. 'If Wall Street analysts or board members urge that brand of CEO to consider possible acquisitions, it's a bit like telling your ripening teenager to be sure to have a normal sex life,' Buffett said. Buffett is sitting on $116 billion of cash and bonds because he's struggled to find acquisitions at sensible prices. And Buffett is unwilling to load up on debt to finance deals at current prices. 'We will stick with our simple guideline: The less the prudence with which others conduct their affairs, the greater the prudence with which we must conduct our own,' Buffett wrote. He said the conglomerate recorded a $29 billion paper gain because of the tax reforms Congress passed late last year. That helped it generate $44.9 billion profit last year, up from $24.1 billion the previous year. Buffett's letter is always well-read in the business world because of his remarkable track record over more than five decades and his talent for explaining complicated subjects in plain language. But this year's letter left some investors wanting more because he didn't say much about Berkshire's succession plan, some noteworthy investment moves or the company's new partnership with Amazon and JP Morgan Chase to reduce health care costs. Edward Jones analyst Jim Shanahan said he expected the 87-year-old Buffett to devote more of the letter to explaining his decision to promote and name the top two candidates to eventually succeed him as Berkshire's CEO. Buffett briefly mentioned that move in two paragraphs at the very end of his letter. That surprised John Fox, chief investment officer at FAM Funds, which holds Berkshire stock. 'He didn't say a lot about succession. I was expecting more,' Fox said. Shanahan said it also would have been nice to read Buffett's thoughts on why he is selling off Berkshire's IBM investment but maintaining big stakes in Wells Fargo and US Bancorp. But Buffett did offer some sage investment advice based on his victory in a 10-year bet he made with a group of hedge funds. The S&P 500 index fund Buffett backed generated an 8.5 percent average annual gain and easily outpaced the hedge funds. One of Buffett's favorite charities, Girls Inc. of Omaha, received $2.2 million as a result of the bet. Buffett said it's important for people to invest money regularly regardless of the market's ups and downs, but watch out for investment fees which will eat away at returns. Succeeding in the stock market requires the discipline to act sensibly when markets do crazy things. Buffett said investors need 'an ability to both disregard mob fears or enthusiasms and to focus on a few simple fundamentals. A willingness to look unimaginative for a sustained period - or even to look foolish - is also essential.' Buffett said investors shouldn't assume that bonds are less risky than stocks. At times, bonds are riskier than stocks. Berkshire owns more than 90 subsidiaries, including clothing, furniture and jewelry firms. It also has major investments in such companies as Coca-Cola Co. and Wells Fargo & Co. ___ Follow Josh Funk online at www.twitter.com/funkwrite ___ Online: Berkshire Hathaway Inc.: www.berkshirehathaway.com