Listen Live:

UK’s Sky News coverage of London terror attack

ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
51°
Broken Clouds
H 60° L 47°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    51°
    Current Conditions
    Broken Clouds. H 60° L 47°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    61°
    Today
    Partly Cloudy. H 70° L 54°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    71°
    Tomorrow
    Partly Cloudy. H 70° L 54°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Latest from Veronica Waters

    The trial of the man accused of killing a south Georgia teacher might be done in absolute secrecy.  On Thursday, Superior Court Judge Melanie Cross heard arguments from lawyers after several groups of media organizations filed motions appealing her gag order in the Tara Grinstead case.   Thursday's arguments revealed another, very surprising order the judge signed last month saying the entire trial should be done behind closed doors.  WSB legal analyst Phil Holloway calls the order a bombshell. “I’m absolutely shocked.”  “I’ve never seen anything like it in my entire career. I’ve spoken to lawyers who’ve practiced much longer than me. Unanimously, every single person believes that this is an unlawful order.”  Holloway adds that he does not think the order was an accident. “It appears to be very clear; it says the public is to be excluded from the process.”   When asked what the worst case scenario could be if the order is not overturned, Holloway says, “The defendant goes into the judge’s office, closes the door, enters a plea of guilty, stipulates to a factual basis without giving any details, and goes to prison without the public ever knowing what happened to Tara Grinstead.”  In October 2005, Grinstead disappeared from her home and investigators had scant clues to find her.  More than 11 years later, Ryan Duke, a former student at the high school where Grinstead taught history, was arrested and charged with her murder. A classmate, Bo Dukes, was also charged with helping him destroy and hide the body.  “The fact that this case is high-profile really adds to the argument that the public and the media have a right to know what’s going on,” Holloway says.  The public, Holloway explains, has a first amendment right to access criminal trials. “There is a recognized public interest in knowing what goes on in our courts.”  Holloway says the Supreme Court struck down a similar DeKalb County order years ago. “In 2010, the U.S. Supreme Court slapped down a DeKalb County judge, and said that trial courts are obligated to take very reasonable measure to accommodate public attendance at criminal trials.”  He says reporters will likely fight this and win.
  • A judge in Ocilla, Georgia, says she expects to rule within a week on whether to change or lift her broad gag order in the case of a south Georgia beauty queen's murder.  Tara Grinstead disappeared from her home in October, 2005, and investigators had scant clues to find her. More than 11 years later, Ryan Duke, a former student at the high school where Grinstead taught history, was arrested and charged with her murder. A classmate, Bo Dukes, was also charged with helping him destroy and hide the body.  Thursday, Superior Court Judge Melanie Cross heard arguments from lawyers after several groups of media organizations filed motions appealing the gag order, which was requested by Duke's attorney.  'This matter of pretrial publicity is the tail wagging the dog. It's overstated,' said lawyer David Hudson, arguing against the gag order for several newspapers.   WSB legal analyst Phil Holloway expects that Cross would narrow, clarify, or lift her order, which he says at least appears to be overbroad and restricting free speech.  'It's been interpreted by many people in the court system, for example, to believe that they cannot release public court documents,' says Holloway. 'In addition, it prevents any potential witness from saying anything about the case--and at this point, who knows who's a witness? Arguably, it could keep Tara Grinstead's best friend from saying something nice about her to WSB Radio.'   Derek Bauer contends that press coverage can help lead to justice, and says even in a high-profile case like Grinstead's disappearance, media reports helped generate tips and information for law enforcement. None of the coverage thus far has risen to a level of harm, he argued.  'Not all publicity is bad publicity,' said Bauer.   But public defender John Mobley argues 'pervasive' media coverage harms Ryan Duke's right to a fair trial, especially in a community with about 9,000 residents.  'There's certainly harm,' said Mobley. 'There's certainly prejudice, especially as it relates to law enforcement and statements that they've made thus far. They've discussed the guilt of my client, and specifics as it relates to the evidence.'  'With all respect to a defendant's Sixth Amendment right, which of course is of the utmost importance, a defendant is not entitled to a jury that has no knowledge of anything,' said Attorney Lesli Gaither, arguing for Channel 2 Action News and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.   Holloway agrees, saying that is well-established law upheld by several courts.  'This is such a small community--really small--that there's practically nobody that doesn't know something about the case. So you're not really going to find a jury in that county that knows nothing,' says Holloway.   Lawyers pointed out that in the high-profile Ross Harris trial, which garnered nationwide coverage, a gag order was rejected in that case--which was ultimately moved because pretrial publicity made it impossible to pick a jury in Cobb County. Harris was later convicted by a jury in Glynn County. Holloway adds that in the Harris trial, only certain documents related to defense strategy were filed under seal--not the entire court record as is currently being done in the Duke case.  But Mobley said in court that the gag order is the best way to keep the jury pool from being spoiled.   'Talking about voir dire and sequestering a jury is great if we're a week from trial,' said Mobley. 'We're talking at least a year or possibly more from the trial in this case. There's no other way to limit this type of information, to limit the jury from being tainted by information that could be released by law enforcement and others. It's just not possible.'  Looking at the judge's sealing order, Holloway says that the way it's written, the entire case can be done in secret--even a potential plea deal or a trial. That, he says, would prevent the public from ever knowing what happened to Tara Grinstead.  'We don't want cases tried in the media,' says Holloway. 'That's the reason for legitimate gag orders. But you can't just stop an entire community from talking about something of such great public interest.'  Judge Cross says she expects to rule 'within the week.
  • Could President’s Trump’s proposed $1 trillion infrastructure plan mean big bucks for Georgia mass transit? The American Public Transportation Association's Mantill Williams says the current federal transportation formula allocations allows for 20% of that funding to go to investments in public transportation. 'If you look at four different federal formula programs, Atlanta would receive over $219 million of that,' Williams tells WSB.  In the latest report card from the American Society of Civil Engineers, U. S. infrastructure got a grade of D+.  Among individual categories, transit scored the lowest grade of D-. Williams listed some of a number of projects which could stand to benefit in Georgia. 'A Clayton County high-capacity transit project is on the books. Bus rapid transit to connect Cobb. Bus rapid simulates rail transit, so buses would come every five to 10 minutes,' explains Williams. 'You would also have an impact on the I-20 East MARTA extension--that'd be about $2.5 million--as well as the Atlanta Beltline, that light rail system.'  Williams says public transportation not only gets people to and from jobs--it creates them, too. 'If you get the $200 billion from this trillion, we're talking 10 million jobs nationwide over a 10-year period,' he says.  'For every dollar you put into public transportation, you generate four dollars in economic return.  It really creates and sustains jobs.' One state's governor noted at an ASCE event Thursday in Washington that GOP lawmakers often opposed increased infrastructure spending when President Obama was in the White House.  'I hope Republicans in Congress treat a Republican president better on infrastructure if he comes forward with a plan,' said Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy. 'If they don't get it done when you have Republican Congress and a Republican president, then we’re really in tough shape.' In December 2015, Mr. Obama signed a $305 billion infrastructure bill passed with bipartisan support.  Mr. Trump proposes a public-private partnership for this trillion-dollar plan, and during the campaign, proposed a plan to offer $137 billion in tax credits to private investors who help build public infrastructure projects. Williams says even in a state like Georgia, whose legislature is typically not quick to spend money on public transportation, the infrastructure spending could be appealing. 'We're thinking that once you have that federal match, that usually provides a huge incentive, at least on the state level, to move some of these projects forward,' says Williams. 'A lot of these projects are like a three-legged stool--you need local, state, and federal money.
  • Her single-engine Cessna had smoke in the cockpit. Her throttle was stuck. And then, there were communications problems with the folks on the ground. Thirteen months later, the group of Atlanta traffic controllers who helped Cathy Lewan land her tiny plane at the world's busiest airport will receive their industry's highest honor.  It was Valentine's Day 2016 when Lewan, a pilot of more than 20 years, had taken off from Madison, GA in her Cessna 172S, to do some aerial photography near Atlanta's international airport for an industrial project. It was a cold day, and Lewan had pulled on her heat, but got smoke in her cockpit. She got it isolated and as she turned over the problem in her mind, trying to determine where it was originating, Lewan went to push the throttle--and nothing happened.  She likens it to being in a car with a gas pedal stuck.  'Can't slow the plane down, and being in Hartsfield-Jackson's airspace, I knew I was a threat to them as well,' says Lewan.   >>To listen to audio from Lewan’s emergency landing, CLICK HERE. No maneuvering of the throttle changed the speed of her plane, so Lewan radioed in her emergency to the Atlanta Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) and was quickly connected with Mason Braddock, as another controller took over other planes on a different frequency so Braddock could handle Lewan's emergency.  Over the course of 50 minutes, the midair drama played out as Braddock helped keep Lewan calm. Braddock says his voice was deliberately calm, because he felt it was his duty to keep Lewan calm and help her put her plane down the way he knew she could. Yet behind the scenes, he says, the team was scrambling.  'We were putting our heads together and trying to pool all our resources and try to find out the best plan for her,' says Braddock.   The solution from pilots and fellow controller Keith Tyus was pretty simple, he said: to cut her fuel supply to the engine. It would be a different landing for her, they knew, but one she could handle--especially on the 9,000-foot-long runway at Hartsfield-Jackson. TRACON notified first responders, and the ARFF (aviation rescue and firefighting) emergency vehicles parked below as Lewan kept flying.  'Alrighty, uh, can I ask you one more favor?' Lewan said over the radio. 'Would you call my husband for me?'  Braddock said they would. 'Ask him to put a prayer chain out to my church...tell him that I love him and call my mother,' said Lewan. 'I know I'm going to be fine because you're helping me and the good Lord is helping me, but I always need prayer.'   'We're going to call him right now for you and we'll make sure everyone knows we're taking good care of you,' replied Braddock. 'It's just gonna be a normal landing and all we're gonna do different is just cut power right before we touch down. It's gonna be fine.'   Lewan circled the airport to run down her fuel supply, making sure she didn't go so low and slow that she lost power while staying below the airbus and commercial jet traffic at the airport.    The FAA says a short time later, with Lewan still very nervous, Braddock asked her if she wanted to do a practice fly-by to get the feel of a low approach and the look of the runway. She accepted, and the practice run seemed to provide her with the confidence needed to attempt the approach to a landing, although Lewan said seeing the emergency vehicles was unnerving.    'I should be able to knock this out. I'm so sorry for all those emergency people sitting down there waiting on me,' Lewan said.  'Number Six-Six Delta, that is absolutely the reason we're here. We're here for you,' said Braddock.  As she prepared to come in, Lewan radioed to confirm her frequency and to tell the controller she hoped to get his name later to say thanks.  'And, uh, as I always say before landing, 'Dear Lord, please keep me safe. Thank you.''   Lewan landed the Cessna, coming in over the flashing emergency lights lined up below, and says once she rolled to a stop, she thanked God and the cockpit door flew open. A firefighter asked her if she need medical help, and she said, 'No!'  Braddock says when the tower called them at TRACON to tell them Lewan had landed safely, there were sighs of relief in the room--and some fist-pumping.  'It was good moment,' says Braddock.  Lewan admits listening to the tape of their conversation today is still terrifying. She says, though, she never felt alone with Braddock and the team on the other end of the radio, and trusted that she'd get down safely.  'It was amazing, and terrifying, and wonderful in every way,' says Lewan. Exactly one week from today, in Las Vegas, the five controllers involved will receive the Archie League Medal of Safety, the highest honor from the National Air Traffic Controllers Association (NATCA). Named for the first air traffic controller, the Archie League Medal of Safety honors air traffic controllers who have performed life-saving work in the previous calendar year.
  • The Oasis Goodtime Emporium on Peachtree Industrial Boulevard says it's not just a nudie bar any more, it's got artistic merit--and Tuesday, took its case over a denied liquor license all the way to the state Supreme Court. The City of Doraville says Oasis can't legally sell alcohol because the city ordinances bar it in businesses where there is full nudity. The ordinance does allow semi-nude dancing, where performers wear pasties and G-strings. The city found Oasis in violation of the rules, and got a temporary injunction issued against the club. 'Your Honor, our position is that we should be allowed to continue operating while we litigate the merits of our argument that the serious artistic value exception in the city's own code now applies to us,' argued club attorney Eric Coffelt. In 2015, Oasis challenged the Doraville code that defines a 'sexually-oriented business,' but a trial court and the state Supreme Court ruled against them.  A club attorney says Oasis, under the direction of former Republican State Rep. Jill Chambers – now the Oasis artistic director – revamped its performances to comply with Doraville's law before the state Supreme Court's 2015 ruling.  'The code says you can be nude and serve alcohol if you put on entertainment that has serious artistic value, and that's what we've done,' says Alan Begner.  'We have burlesque, we have aerial acts, we have body painting, we have entertainers who walk around with headdresses.  We do lip syncing of famous artists.'   Chambers says the club has at least two burlesque shows per day, and also has on its bill performance artists who appear at mainstream venues like 7 Stages, The Tabernacle, or Red Light Cafe.    'We've been in business there for over 26 years,' says Chambers.  'Doraville annexed us in, and changed the law in order to shut us down.'   The city contends that in the months after the state Supreme Court maintained that Oasis is a sexually-oriented business as defined by the city, Doraville officers went to the Goodtime Emporium and observed nude dancers giving lap dances and selling alcohol. That is when they moved for an injunction against the club. Lawyer Scott Bergthold argues for the city that the club's violations are clear, and that the revamped lineup does not qualify it for an exception under the city's ordinances. 'This business qualified as a sexually-oriented business, specifically an adult cabaret because it regularly featured semi-nudity. Done,' Bergthold argued to justices. He says the code that allows for alcohol sales does have an exception for 'theatrical and highbrow arts productions,' but that it does not apply to sexually-oriented businesses. 'Oasis does not even challenge any of the overwhelming evidence of their ongoing and regular semi-nudity, nudity, paid sexual contact, and unlicensed alcohol sales,' he says. Begner insists the club is now in compliance, and they expect to win at trial over the issues in question. No trial date has been set. 'We are not ignoring the injunction,' says Begner.  'We have changed to a format that is legal. We still are serving alcohol, and we are appealing the denial of our alcohol license.  We're expecting a trial on both those issues and expect to actually win the trial because we're complying. 'I think we're going to stay open, as long as we stick to our mainstream performance entertainment, I think we will get the alcohol license,' he says. Justices are expected to rule on the case within six months.
  • She was staying with a friend in Georgia to get back on her feet. Instead, a 22-year-old Indiana woman finds herself locked down behind bars in Hall County. After allegedly abusing a friend's son, she then abandoned her own children. Selena Delatorre came to the attention of law enforcement because of allegations of inappropriate contact with a minor last month. 'Ms. Delatorre is accused of having sexual contact with a 12-year-old male child,' says Hall County Sheriff's Deputy Stephen Wilbanks. The boy is not related to her; he is the son of a friend. Wilbanks says the boy talked to investigators, and they believe the contact only happened once. During the course of the investigation, deputies learned that Delatorre had beaten her two-year-old son with a phone charger cord, causing 'substantial' wounds. 'It left visible wounds on the child in place of his body that is not typical for corporal punishment,' says Wilbanks. 'It wasn't a spanking. It was far more than that.' Delatorre then went to Atlanta, leaving behind her little boy and her one-year-old daughter with a friend. 'Through a phone conversation with that friend, [she] indicated that she no longer wanted her children,' says Wilbanks. Delatorre is now jailed on charges of child molestation, first-degree child cruelty, and child abandonment. She faces a committal hearing March 16. Wilbanks says DFCS is involved in making sure Delatorre's children are safe.
  • More than 11 years after the baffling disappearance of a south Georgia teacher, the man allegedly responsible for her murder has been arrested.  JT Ricketson, special agent for the Georgia Bureau of Investigation, says Ryan Alexander Duke is in police custody. GBI officials held a 3:00 news conference Thursday at the Irwin County Courthouse in Ocilla, Ga., to announce a major break in the case of Tara Grinstead. 'This gentleman never came up in our radar,' Ricketson said of Ryan Duke. Grinstead was last seen around 11:00 on the Saturday night of October 22, 2005, after the Miss Sweet Potato pageant of Ocilla's Sweet Potato Festival. A former Miss Tipton, Grinstead had helped with the contestants' hair and makeup. The 30-year-old teacher was reported missing by Irwin High School colleagues on Monday, October 24, when she didn't show up for work. 'The only things missing from her house are her purse and keys, but her car is sitting out front,' Irwin County Sheriff’s Chief Deputy Billy Hancock said at the time.   Grinstead's phone was also found inside her home.   Published reports said that a nightstand lamp was on the floor. Outside the house, investigators found a latex glove with a partial fingerprint. Police never ruled out foul play in the case. WSB Radio updated the investigation two years ago in February, when a source contacted the GBI, which led them to a small pond on some private property in Fitzgerald, on the north side of Ben Hill County.  GBI Special Agent in Charge J.T. Ricketson was hopeful about the tip which led them to drain the pond in 2015.  Agents slogged through mud and silt with shovels and rakes, searching for clues--or a body. 'We found a few items that were mentioned from our source,' said Ricketson.  'We did not find any remains or anything like that, which was disappointing to us.'   He was tight-lipped about what was found, but said they would follow the new leads wherever they took investigators. 'When we put together cases, it's like putting a puzzle together,' said Ricketson.  'Some jigsaw puzzles have 100 pieces. This one has several thousand pieces.' He added that there a particular obstacles involved in a missing person case. “When you look at a missing person case unlike say a homicide scene or a robbery scene, burglary, whatever--You generally have a crime scene that you can work with where you can go in and try to find evidence,” Ricketson explained. “In a missing person case, you don’t really have any specific scene. They just vanished.” He said in the case of Grinstead, the GBI “didn’t have a scene where we had a struggle or anything like that where you could back and look for trace evidence, DNA, fingerprints. “We just were very limited in what presented itself to us, trying to backtrack Tara Grinstead and where she went, what her routine was, who she had contact with.” Ricketson added, “And Tara was a very popular person. She didn’t have just a routine that was basic. She had a lot of things that she did, and she traveled in and around different cities and counties down there. “It’s been a very difficult case.
  • Atlantans get more robocalls than anyone else in America. The telecommunications service company YouMail says for the 14th month in a row in January, Atlanta was the most robocalled city in the U.S., receiving 100.7 million calls that month alone.  Nationwide, 2.3 billion robocalls went out in January. '2.3 billion robocalls in a month means 73 million robocalls per day, or 845 robocalls placed every second,' says Alex Quilici, CEO of YouMail.  'Regulators, carriers and software makers all need to step up by implementing stronger protections for the American people.'  Among its services, YouMail provides call-blocking technology for mobile phones.  Atlanta area code 404 topped the list with 47.5 million calls received--nearly 40 calls per person in January.  Area code 678 came in at #4, and 770 ranked #17. Atlanta residents say the calls are becoming unique in their pitches. Robocall recipient Pam Roberts says she gets six or seven such calls per week, and doesn't know how the callers got her cell phone number. 'I think the one that annoys me the most is I say 'Hello?' and I hear a woman's voice saying, 'Hello!' and then there's a pause, so you think it's going to be a real person on the other end of the phone. And then she says, 'Oh, I'm sorry, was having trouble with my headset,' or 'Oh, sorry, I was distracted,' and you know it's a totally automated call. That's gotta be the most annoying,' says Roberts. David Danzig says although every phone number he has is on the Do Not Call list, he still gets easily three to four robocalls a week.  'I've won thousands of cruises,' says Danzig. 'I've been hired by Google, Facebook, and just about everybody in Silicon Valley.  I live a very exciting life, according to these robotic calls that I get.' WSB consumer expert Clark Howard says these are just the tip of the iceberg. 'The average person gets more than one robocall per day. Some people get a lot more than that,' says Clark.  'The technology that's available today allows criminals and con artists from overseas to reach beyond our shores and make essentially unlimited calls at no cost to people all across the United States.'  YouMail's Robocall Index tracks robocalls by area code and most frequent senders.  In Atlanta, banks and bill collectors appear to be the most frequent robocallers, but Clark says you can't always trust caller ID, because phone numbers and caller names can be 'spoofed.' 'The call will appear to be coming from a company, and you answer it thinking you're talking to that company, but it could just as easily could be a robocall or a scam,' says Clark. Clark lets his cell phone's voice mail screen calls for him. He advises to ignore calls from business numbers, unless you have communicated with a particular company and are expecting a call back from them.   'If you get a number from a private number or an unknown number, never, ever answer that call,' says Clark.
  • Dramatic surveillance video shows the half-minute of terror when two armed robbers launched a takeover-style robbery of a southwest Atlanta convenience store. >>To watch footage of the incident, CLICK HERE. It was after 10:30 Monday night when two suspects, described as black males in Halloween masks, entered the Donnelly Food Store at 1294 Donnelly Avenue. The clerk behind the register was on her cell phone and looked up to see one man leaping over the counter to start grabbing wads of cash from the register. The second man stuck a .45 in her face, looking around the store.   Atlanta Police Sgt. Warren Pickard says the robbery quickly escalated to violence. 'We think that at some point, one of the store owners entered the shopping area from the back,' Pickard explains. “And it might have startled the shooter. He fired one shot, striking the store owner in the chest.' The victim, nicknamed by neighbors as 'Papa' or 'Dad,' was taken to Grady Hospital in critical condition. 'We're concerned about all crime, but when you enter a store at peak shopping hours, really just put other people's personal health in jeopardy, brandishing a weapon, firing shots--it's just conduct we can't accept,' Pickard says.  He adds that while both robbers were masked, police hope someone will recognize them from their mannerisms or distinctive clothing.   Crime Stoppers is offering a $2,000 reward in the case, allowing tipsters to remain anonymous at (404) 577-TIPS (8477).  'We just need some help to solve this heinous crime,' says Sgt. Pickard.
  • As her ex-husband serves life without parole for the hot car death of their young son, Leanna Taylor stands by her belief that it was all a tragic accident. “I do not believe that he planned the murder of my son,” Taylor says of Ross Harris. She tells WSB’s Veronica Waters her ex-husband genuinely loved their son Cooper. “There was never any aspect of him and Cooper’s relationship that did not seem real.” >>To listen to WSB's extended interview with Leanna Taylor, CLICK HERE. Taylor and Harris e-mail right now as they pick Cooper's headstone, but she knows she may never get the answers and closure she really wants. “I still don’t know what happened that day,” she says. Taylor admits as she learned more about Harris' cheating, she considered the worst case scenario. “You have to go down that train of thought of, ‘but what if he did do it on purpose?’” Although she believes Cooper’s death was an accident, Taylor is still angry -- angry with law enforcement, with the lies told about and to her, and of course, with Ross Harris. “Having to live without your child because of a mistake that your spouse made – that trumps everything.” Taylor tells WSB she always wanted to be a mom. “Obviously I never imagined that I would lose him.” When asked whether she would like to have more children, Taylor says, “Yes, but it’s not something that I consider lightly.” Taylor wants Cooper’s death not to be a footnote, but a warning to other parents. Even those who think this could never happen to them.  “Consider it as a possibility, just like any other safety precaution that you would take with your child.” She adds, “There’s so much information out there about ways to prevent it, but you actually have to take the steps to prevent it. “Because the problem is once it happens, it’s too late.” Taylor asserts, “The statement that I had done research related to children dying in hot cars – I actually never did that, but I wish that I had. “And if I had done that, there is a chance that I’d be taking my kindergartner to school next year.
  • Veronica Waters

    Veronica Waters is an anchor and reporter for News/Talk WSB. She is also the staff expert on legal affairs and the courts. In 2007, the Radio-Television News Directors Association named Waters' series on "Snaring Internet Predators" best in the region with an Edward R. Murrow award for Investigative Reporting.

    She has been honored by several professional organizations for news and sports feature reporting, and was named in 2003 as the Atlanta Press Club's Radio Journalist of the Year. Waters has covered an assortment of high-profile cases from Mayor Bill Campbell's corruption trial to the murder trials of activist-turned imam Jamil Al-Amin and of former DeKalb County, GA Sheriff Sidney Dorsey.

    She served as the station's correspondent for the murder trial of accused "Black Widow" Lynn Turner, and the death penalty case of double murderer Stacey Humphreys. One of the biggest legal cases in Atlanta history involved the notorious Gold Club racketeering trial. Waters covered this unfolding drama not only for WSB Radio and radio stations throughout America, but also for a worldwide audience on BBC Radio. Waters joined WSB in 1997 as an anchor and reporter. She began her journalism career at the Southern Urban Network and Mississippi Network in Jackson, MS. Waters attended Alcorn State University and Mississippi State University, and enjoys cheering for the NFL's Tennessee Titans.

    Read More

News

  • An off-duty Fulton County police officer shot a man after a chase in Atlanta Wednesday morning, the GBI says. The officer, whose name has not been released, was in his personal vehicle about 11 a.m., when he responded to a theft at a T-Mobile store on Mount Zion Parkway in Morrow, GBI spokesman Rich Bahan said.  The officer followed the suspect’s car into the city limits of Atlanta while reporting the incident to 911, Bahan said. At some point near Alyson Court, the two cars collided and when the driver got out of his car the off-duty officer shot him with his service weapon, Bahan said.   MORE:  Sheriff: Man out on bond for murder arrested after fighting victim’s family Ex-NFL player jailed after allegedly attacking woman in front of kids Police: Men brought ‘bag of bullets’ to shootout with alleged gang members Witness Jay Mitchell told Channel 2 Action News he thinks the man was shot in the stomach area after the police officer chased him and tried to pull him over. The suspect kept driving even after he was shot, Bahan said, and Atlanta police stopped him in the 1700 block of Lakewood Avenue. Whether the off-duty Fulton County officer stayed on the scene was not released, but his car was found parked at a store on Cleveland Avenue, Channel 2 reported. The man who was shot was taken to Grady Memorial Hospital, Bahan said. The shooting is the fourth in less than a week involving a Georgia officer. A Georgia State Patrol trooper fatally shot a man after a chase early Saturday in Polk County. Jason Dennis Watkins, 36, was taken to Polk County Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. RELATED: GSP trooper fatally shoots man after chase Willie Ivy III, 29, of Atlanta, died after a Fulton County police officer and an armed security guard shot him early Saturday in College Park, the GBI said.  RELATED: Man dead in police-involved shooting incident in College Park A Pickens County sheriff’s sergeant on Tuesday shot and critically injured Gary Lee Castle after he “moved aggressively” toward the official “with a large metal pipe in his hand,” the sheriff’s office said. RELATED: Sergeant shoots, critically injures man, Pickens County sheriff says In January and February, the GBI conducted 17 officer-involved shooting investigations, agency spokeswoman Nelly Miles said. RELATED: OVER THE LINE: Police shootings in Georgia The GBI investigated 78 police shootings in the state last year. In other news:
  • A middle school bus driver in the Valdosta area is accused of driving under the influence of alcohol while students were on her bus, according to the Lowndes County sheriff. Amanda Mullinax, 41, registered more than twice the legal limit, Lowndes County Sheriff Ashley Paulk said. A school resource officer at Hahira Middle School smelled alcohol on Mullinax, and a student said she had been drinking, the Macon Telegraph reported. The night before, deputies were called to a domestic dispute at Mullinax’s home and found she had been drinking heavily, Paulk said. RELATED: School bus driver charged in accident that injured child She could face multiple counts of child endangerment since there were about 44 students on the bus, the newspaper reported. Read more of the story here. In other news:
  • U.S. Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch vowed to uphold the law if confirmed to the nation’s highest court, not tipping his hand as he sidestepped controversial political subjects, as Gorsuch directly pushed back against President Donald Trump’s criticism of federal judges. “When anyone criticizes the honesty or integrity, the motives of a federal judge, I find that disheartening; I find that demoralizing,” Gorsuch said in response to questions from Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-CT). “Anyone including the President of the United States?” Blumenthal pressed. “Anyone is anyone,” Gorsuch replied. In a day of testimony that stretched for almost twelve hours, Gorsuch parried most questions from Democrats, who tried in vain to get him to reveal his views on issues like abortion, and items that might come before the Supreme Court, like President Trump’s travel ban. Gorsuch repeatedly refused to take the bait. “I can’t get involved in politics, and I think it would be very imprudent of judges to start commenting on political disputes,” Gorsuch said. Under questioning from Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Gorsuch was asked what he had discussed with President Trump on the issue of abortion. “In that interview did he ever ask you to overrule Roe v Wade?” Graham asked. “No, Senator,” Gorsuch replied, adding that if the President had asked that question, “I would have walked out the door.” Gorsuch was pressed about the President in a number of different ways, telling Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) that, “nobody is above the law in this country, and that includes the President of the United States.” With Republicans strongly in support of Gorsuch, there was already maneuvering behind the scenes over the expected floor fight in the Senate, as Democrats have made clear they think the GOP should be forced to get 60 votes for his nomination. That has prompted GOP leaders to criticize the threat of a filibuster. “If there aren’t 60 votes for a nominee like Neil Gorsuch it’s appropriate to ask the question is there any nominee any Republican president could make that Democrats would approve,” said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Gorsuch’s lengthy day of testimony ended on a light note, as Sen. John Kennedy (R-LA) suggested to Gorsuch that he have a cocktail before bed. “Just don’t drink vodka,” Kennedy said to chuckles from the audience. Kennedy then drew even more laughter by adding in one more surprise. “You never been to Russia, have you?” “I’ve never been to Russia,” a smiling Gorsuch said.
  • Donald Trump Jr. is facing criticism for tweeting in the hours after Wednesday's London attack a months-old comment from London Mayor Sadiq Khan that terror attacks are part of living in a big city. Trump Jr. tweeted : 'You have to be kidding me?!: Terror attacks are part of living in big city, says London Mayor Sadiq Khan.' The tweet included a link to a Sept. 22 story from Britain's Independent newspaper that includes the quote from Khan, who was asking Londoners to be vigilant following a bombing in New York City. British Member of Parliament Wes Streeting was among numerous Britons who responded to the tweet with criticism. He called Trump Jr. 'a disgrace' and accused him of using a terrorist attack for 'political gain.' When asked about Trump Jr. on Thursday, Khan told CNN: 'I'm not going to respond to a tweet from Donald Trump Jr. I've been doing far more important things over the past 24 hours.' He added that 'terrorists hate the fact' that cities including London, New York and Paris have 'diverse communities living together peacefully.