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Entertainment News

    George Clooney made the rounds at CinemaCon in Las Vegas on Tuesday to promote his upcoming movie, “Suburbicon.” A lot of red carpet chatter led him to use that time to share some details about his wife, lawyer Amal Clooney’s, pregnancy. She is reportedly expecting twins. >> Read more trending news Clooney joked with Entertainment Tonight about the two names he has picked out for his kids. “My wife says I can’t name them Casa and Amigos. That’s the one thing I’m not allowed to do,” he said, joking that he considered naming the twins after his tequila company, Casamigos. “It was just a thought. I mean, you know, it’s a family business,” he joked. Clooney told E News the parents-to-be have not picked out names yet. “I've had friends pick out names around their parents and then it becomes...whatever name you pick they're like, ‘Oh, I don't like that. That guy's a prime minister… Can't name her Susan. You remember your Aunt Susan?’” “I didn't know that we'd have kids,” he told E News. “I was very happy that we were going to get married, and then (a pregnancy) seemed like the next step.' Clooney said Amal Clooney is “doing really great.”  “She is amazing,” he told Extra. “I don’t have anything to do. There is nothing I can do to help but make tea and stuff.” The Clooneys are expecting their twins, a boy and a girl, in June. Shortly after the pregnancy news broke, Clooney’s mom, Nina Clooney, shared details about the twins to Vogue. “It will be one of each! Yes, a boy and a girl. That’s what I’ve been told,” Nina Clooney said. “How marvelous! My husband and I are extremely excited.” The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.
  • Noreen Fraser, a TV producer whose own cancer diagnosis turned her into an activist against the disease, has died. She was 63. Fraser died Monday at her Los Angeles home of metastatic breast cancer, her family said. She joined forces with other prominent women, including Katie Couric, to found Stand Up to Cancer. The organization holds celebrity-filled telethons and has raised a reported $300 million-plus for research since 2008. Its aim is to get lifesaving treatment to patients more quickly through collaborative research. Another of its founders, producer Laura Ziskin, died of breast cancer in 2011 at age 61. Fraser's personal crusade began after she was diagnosed in 2001 with breast cancer, her husband, TV producer Woody Fraser, told the Los Angeles Times. 'She didn't know if she'd see her children graduate from grade school, then high school, then college,' he said, adding that she got to witness those events but not her daughter's upcoming wedding. Fraser established the Noreen Fraser Foundation in 2006 to fund women's cancer research. At her direction, the foundation's assets were transferred last year to the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of California, Los Angeles, where a research lab is named for her. Fraser, a native of Cleveland, produced TV shows including 'Entertainment Tonight' and 'Home Show.' Besides her husband, she is survived by children Madeline and Mack; her parents Jackie and Fred Friend; and eight siblings.
  • Wonder Woman is here to save the world, and, possibly the future of Warner Bros. DC Comics universe. New footage featuring actress Gal Gadot's lasso-wielding superhero stole the show Wednesday night at CinemaCon, which also featured some peeks at 'Aquaman' and 'Justice League.' It also marked Ben Affleck's first public appearance since acknowledging he'd recently completed rehab for alcohol addiction. The 'Batman' star didn't say anything, but just stood alongside his 'Justice League' director Zack Snyder and co-stars Henry Cavill, Jason Momoa and Ezra Miller. But it was Wonder Woman's show, even though Gadot wasn't in Las Vegas. The sepia-soaked extended clips highlighted the World War I espionage thrills as Diana/Wonder Woman adjusts to life with mortals. Co-star Chris Pine, who plays an American soldier, said the Patty Jenkins-directed film had a 'Casablanca' feel. Even the new 'Justice League' footage spotlighted Gadot's Wonder Woman as she breaks into Affleck's supposedly secured bat cave with ease and informs the caped crusader that they would need to assemble to defeat a threat. 'Wonder Woman' hits theaters June 2 and 'Justice League' bows Nov. 17.
  • A propeller stops midair. Soldiers packed like sardines on a pier cower in fear of an unseen threat. Those are the images Christopher Nolan left CinemaCon audiences hanging onto Wednesday as he premiered new footage from 'Dunkirk,' his long-awaited epic about the storied World War II evacuation. 'It's something British people grow up with. It's in our DNA,' Nolan said. 'It's something that's been close to my heart for a long time.' Nolan told the audience of theater owners that he wanted to tell the story in the most visceral way possible, putting audiences on the beaches, in the air and running with the troops. The 'Interstellar' and 'Dark Knight' director shot the film entirely on large format celluloid and said theaters are the only way to experience the suspenseful survival story. 'The only platform I'm interested in talking about is theatrical exhibition,' Nolan said. 'I want to thank you all for everything you've done for my films. Without you there is no audience.' The film's large eclectic ensemble cast includes veterans like Kenneth Branagh and Mark Ryland, Nolan mainstays Tom Hardy and Cillian Murphy, pop star Harry Styles and a few newcomers like Fionn Whitehead. It arrives in theaters on July 21.
  • Executive changes are afoot at BET Networks. The cable channel said Wednesday that its programming president, Stephen Hill, is stepping down. BET also announced that executive vice president Zola Mashariki is leaving. Connie Orlando, a BET senior vice president, will serve as interim programming chief after Hill's departure Friday. Last month, Viacom's CEO identified BET Networks as one of the brands the media conglomerate intends to focus on. Others cited by Viacom chief Bob Bakish included Comedy Central and Paramount Network, the rebranded Spike TV. The changes come a month before BET Networks presents its upcoming schedules to advertisers. BET's recent programs included 'The New Edition Story,' a miniseries about the R&B group that was a ratings success.
  • The Fate of the Furious' is in, and it's good according to first reactions to the upcoming film. Universal Pictures surprised CinemaCon audiences on Wednesday with an unannounced screening of the eighth film in the franchise and praise spread quickly on Twitter. The Hollywood Reporter's Rebecca Ford said it was perfection, while the trade publication's Aaron Couch said it is 'exactly what you buy your ticket for,' calling out Jason Statham's film-stealing sequences. Couch also noted that there are a few 'so bad they're good moments' that the improbable franchise has become known for, including a particularly over-the-top sequence with a submarine. IMDB's Keith Simanton said director F. Gary Gray, a newcomer to the franchise fresh off of 'Straight Outta Compton,' is 'up to the task.' Slashfilm's Peter Sciretta wrote that it 'takes the ridiculousness to a whole new level, but feels very different.' And Steven Weintraub of Collider.com singled out Dwayne Johnson in particular who he called a 'straight up superhero.' Johnson, among other things, deadlifts concrete and coaches a girls soccer team. 'The Fate of the Furious' reunites the Los Angeles street racers, including Michelle Rodriquez, Tyrese Gibson, Ludacris, and Nathalie Emmanuel, taking them to the streets of Cuba, New York, Berlin and to the frozen Russian landscape. Charlize Theron joins as a dreadlocked baddie with nuclear ambitions and Scott Eastwood teams up with Kurt Russell as an agent in training. Official reviews are embargoed until April 10 before it races into theaters on April 14.
  • To help shed her early reputation, Angelina Jolie agreed to be drug tested during production of 2001's 'Lara Croft: Tomb Raider,' according to a new book. The Hollywood Reporter on Wednesday released an excerpt from an upcoming biography of the former studio head Sherry Lansing, 'Leading Lady.' Lansing stepped down as Paramount Pictures chairman and chief executive in 2005. When casting the then 24-year-old Jolie for 'Lara Croft,' Lansing had concerns about Jolie's stability. This was shortly before the actress wed Billy Bob Thornton. Then-Paramount production president John Goldwyn said the studio had Jolie undergo random drug tests. Director Simon West recounts that Jolie, eager for the part and to prove herself, said she would do anything — including daily drug tests — to 'prove that I'm worthy.
  • Jordan Peele, writer and director of the brilliant socially conscious horror film “Get Out,” is being honored as Director of the Year at CinemaCon, the gathering of the National Association of Theatre Owners, happening March 30 in Las Vegas. >> Read more trending news “With the phenomenon known as ‘Get Out,’ Jordan Peele has instantaneously become a force to reckon with as a gifted and enormously talented director and filmmaker,” CinemaCon Managing Director Mitch Neuhauser said in a statement. “He has audiences and critics around the globe enamored and spellbound, dare I say hypnotized, with his wildly inventive directorial debut, and we are ecstatic to be honoring him as this year’s ‘Director of the Year.’” Related: Jordan Peele's directorial debut 'Get Out' makes impressive box office gross “Get Out,” his directorial debut, is quite a departure from “Keanu” or the acclaimed Comedy Central sketch comedy series “Key and Peele.” The movie starts out hitting the notes of a romantic comedy, with Chris, played by Daniel Kaluuya, who is black, and Rose, played by Allison Williams, who is white, headed to a weekend at her parents’ home outside of New York and in the countryside. Related: Jordan Peele’s “Get Out” takes on the horrors of racism “I wrote this movie in the Obama presidency. It felt like race was not being discussed in a way I felt like it deserved to be,” Peele said during an interview with The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “For the past couple of years and especially now, racial tension and racial conversation is front and center in this country.” The movie captivated audiences and made history when Peele became the first African-American writer-director to earn $100 million with his debut movie. Yet he knows all too well the persistent sting of racism. “I’ve been asked to hang up coats” while attending black-tie events, he said. “We have to look within ourselves constantly,” Peele said. “Racism is always going to be present in this country, and racism is not a one-sided dynamic. This isn’t just a black horror movie, this is a movie everyone is meant to enjoy. It’s a way to promote that conversation in a way that’s fun.”
  • Part of music icon Bob Dylan's once-secret 6,000-piece archive, including thousands of hours of studio sessions, film reels and caches of unpublished lyrics, has opened in Oklahoma, curators announced this week. More than 1,000 pieces spanning Dylan's six-decade career are available to scholars at the Gilcrease Museum's Helmerich Center for American Research in Tulsa. The public will get a glimpse of some of the material when the Bob Dylan Center opens in the city's downtown Brady Arts District in about two years. The center will, fittingly, occupy another part of a building that houses a museum devoted to Oklahoma-born Woody Guthrie, one of Dylan's major influences. The George Kaiser Family Foundation and the University of Tulsa announced last year that the collection had been acquired from Dylan for an estimated $15 million to $20 million. The foundation also snapped up Guthrie's archives in 2011, paying $3 million. The Woody Guthrie Center opened two years later. 'A couple hundred books have been written about Bob Dylan, maybe equal to or more books than have been written about Abraham Lincoln, but none of the writers have had the access to any of this material,' said Stanton Doyle, a senior program officer at the foundation. 'I think people will get an insight into Dylan and his creative process that's never been released.' The archive is a goldmine for Dylan fans. There are pages of unrecorded verses — one for a song called 'No Particular Length of Time'— lyrics scrawled across hotel stationary; pocket memo books of every shape and color, filled with notes on royalty rates and telephone numbers for notables like Allen Ginsberg and John Lennon. Faxes from former President Jimmy Carter and Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards and letters from former first lady Michelle Obama, director Martin Scorsese and Bono are also in the trove. Then there are the audio recordings and film reels — enough so that it would take around 113 days to consecutively listen to and watch all of the available material, estimates curator Michael Chaiken. 'Nobody knew Bob held onto so much stuff,' Chaiken said in an interview Wednesday. 'The materials we are opening up have never been seen before by the public at large.' Chaiken found himself doing a deep dive on the sessions that would become the album titled 'John Wesley Harding.' 'To hear the alternate versions to 'All Along the Watchtower,' it was amazing,' Chaiken said. 'He's like a Miles Davis character when he goes into the studio, there's so much improvisation going on and moving things around, trying to find the rhythm.' When it was announced that the archive was coming to Tulsa last year, it raised a few highbrow eyebrows among those who wondered why it wasn't going to an Ivy League school, for example, or a much larger city like New York or Los Angeles, or even to Minnesota, where the singer is from. Curators explained then that the move was vintage Dylan —zigging when everybody else was zagging. Dylan did it his way again last year when he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, but declined to attend the traditional Nobel Prize banquet in December, citing other commitments. It was announced Wednesday that he'll accept his diploma and medal this weekend while performing concerts in Stockholm.
  • As a powerful storm system swept across Texas, storm chasers raced to record its fury and witness a tornado. But one such pursuit ended tragically when three men were killed as their vehicles collided at a rural crossroads. An SUV containing two storm chasers working under contract to The Weather Channel ran a stop sign Tuesday about 60 miles east of Lubbock and struck a Jeep driven by an amateur from Arizona, authorities said. It was not the first time storm chasers were killed trying to document violent weather up close. In 2013, three researchers died when a twister packing winds up to 165 mph turned on them near El Reno, Oklahoma. The latest tragedy just underscored the risks of speeding after storms to capture meteorological data and hair-raising video — a field that has become crowded in recent years with seasoned professionals, amateur weather enthusiasts and thrill-seekers who like getting their names and footage on TV. Here are a few things to know about storm chasing: ___ EARLIER TRAGEDY The deaths in 2013 of longtime storm chasers Tim Samaras, his son Paul and colleague Carl Young were probably the first 'storm intercept fatalities' among researchers, the National Weather Center said at the time. They died racing down a storm that killed 13 people in Oklahoma City and its suburbs. Tim Samaras and his Twistex tornado chase team produced material for the Discovery Channel, National Geographic and meteorological conferences. Just before he died, Samaras tweeted a photo of clouds rising through a volatile atmosphere and noted: 'Dangerous day ahead for OK stay weather savvy!' An amateur storm chaser named Richard Charles Henderson died pursuing the same storm. He sent a friend a cellphone photo of the tornado that killed him minutes later. ___ CROWDED FIELD The father of storm chasing is widely considered to be David Hoadley, a retired U.S. government administrator who has recorded some 230 tornadoes over more than half a century of running down storms. But the field has grown far more crowded because of the financial incentives, the rise of social media and entertainment such as the Discovery Channel's 'Storm Chasers' and the 1996 movie 'Twister,' starring Bill Paxton and Helen Hunt. Tim Samaras told National Geographic shortly before his death that it's not uncommon for hundreds of storm chasers to line the roads as a storm develops. In fact, investigators learned of Tuesday's deadly crash from a fleet of other storm chasers who came across the wreckage. Many amateurs are looking to capture terrifying video of a huge twister and cash in by selling the footage to TV stations or documentary filmmakers. News outlets generally pay up to $500 for such video. Sometimes the storm chasers are not even after money but the thrill of hearing their names read on the air. ___ ENDURING FASCINATION The awe-inspiring power of tornadoes has long fascinated people. In 1755, Benjamin Franklin described a tornado chase on horseback, according to the American Meteorological Society. Attempts to set up instruments in the path of tornadoes have been made since the 1970s to map the winds and gather other information. Armored vehicles have been positioned inside twisters to collect data, and mobile radar has been used since the 1990s to track the winds in 3-D, along with precipitation and debris. The society said in a 2014 report that professional storm chasers are highly mobile and aware of the hazards, and know to keep their distance. Also, because twisters are usually short-lived and not on the ground for very long, 'the risks posed to storm chasers by tornadoes are relatively minor.' ___ Associated Press researcher Rhonda Shafner in New York contributed to this report.

News

  • Pickens County deputies are searching for an armed fugitive.  Authorities are looking for Nicholas Bishop in the area of Priest Circle in Talking Rock.  Bishop is believed to be armed with a handgun and on foot after he abandoned a stolen vehicle around 2 p.m.  If you see him, call 911 immediately. Officials say do not attempt to approach him. - Please return for updates.
  • One more time, Doris Payne, the 86-year-old infamous international jewel thief, has pleaded guilty to the usual crime. She admitted Wednesday to stealing a necklace from Von Maur at Perimeter Mall last year, the DeKalb County District Attorney’s Office said. Payne, who recently said she’s been dealing with a possibly cancerous tumor, was sentenced to 120 days of house arrest and three years of probation.  She was also banned from all Von Maur locations and every mall in DeKalb County. Payne, who’d been free on bond, was arrested last month for missing a court date. Shortly after the would-be appearance, she told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution she wasn’t medically able to attend. “I ain’t runnin’,” she said in a phone interview. “I’ve never in my life been late for court. Last month, Payne was deemed too ill to stand trial by the judge presiding over a Fulton County case stemming from a missing set of earrings at Phipps Plaza. Payne has been open about her habits of theft, which she detailed in a documentary called, “The Life and Crimes of Doris Payne.” RELATED: Huge DeKalb center with (at least) 8 popular chains is opening soon RELATED: Cop helps elderly woman who got kicked out of dentist office in DeKalb RELATED: A DeKalb family’s tale of two dead bodies and a crying baby girl Like DeKalb County News Now on Facebook | Follow on Twitter and Instagram
  • A drunken driver destroyed a row of headstones at a historic Carrollton cemetery, causing tens of thousands of dollars' worth of damage, police said. According to police, the driver was coming down Martin Luther King Street on March 19, ran a stop sign, jumped a curb and crashed into the city-owned cemetery. The broken headstones range in date from the late 1800s to 1950. 'And what we discussed is, if one is damaged beyond repair, we'll put something back that's respectful. It's hard to replace it with the exact same item. The families aren't around anymore, so the city will take on the responsibility,' city manager Tim Grizzard said. TRENDING STORIES: Thousands of Georgians could lose food stamps next week 16-year-old in custody after hoax call about school gunman Food prices at SunTrust Park vs. Mercedes-Benz Stadium: What's the difference? The 35-year-old driver, Ray Antonio Baker, was arrested and charged with DUI. City officials said they will ask his insurance carrier to pay for the damage. 'Our plan is to go after the individual's insurance to pay for repairs. If that doesn't pay for everything, the city will certainly pick up the tab,' Grizzard said. Officials said this isn't the first time a driver has damaged headstones, but it's not a big enough problem to put up a wall. 'It's not something that has happened often enough that we need to put up a barrier. If it was a recurrent spot, we would do something,' Grizzard said. City officials said it could take weeks to repair the damage.
  • Their hug was silent, their smiles broad. After more than six weeks in custody, a Mexican man who had been arrested despite his participation in a program designed to prevent the deportation of those brought to the U.S. illegally as children was freed Wednesday pending deportation proceedings. Daniel Ramirez Medina, 24, greeted his brother — also a participant in the program — in the lobby of the Federal Detention Center in Tacoma, surrounded by lockers and metal detectors. 'He's free to go,' a guard told them, and after conferring with one of his lawyers, Ramirez stepped into the sunshine and hugged his brother again for a crowd of news cameras waiting just beyond the chain link-and-barbed wire fence. He spoke to reporters briefly in Spanish, thanking his supporters, and later issued a written statement in English through his lawyers. 'I'm so happy to be reunited with my family today and can't wait to see my son,' it said. 'This has been a long and hard 46 days, but I'm so thankful for the support that I've gotten from everyone who helped me and for the opportunity to live in such an amazing country. I know that this isn't over, but I'm hopeful for the future, for me and for the hundreds of thousands of other Dreamers who love this country like I do.' Judge John Odell in Tacoma approved freeing the 24-year-old Ramirez on $15,000 bond until his next immigration court hearing. Immigration agents arrested him last month in suburban Seattle, saying he acknowledged affiliating with gangs. Officials then revoked his protected status. Ramirez adamantly denies any gang ties or making any such admission. He spent 40 minutes answering questions from prosecutors during a two-hour hearing Tuesday, repeatedly denying any gang connections, his attorney, Mark Rosenbaum, said. 'He answered every question the government put to him,' Rosenbaum said. 'He stayed true, and the government had no evidence whatsoever.' U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement issued a statement Wednesday noting that Ramirez's own attorneys had twice declined to have their client participate in bond hearings that could have resulted in his earlier release — something his lawyers said was designed to keep his case in federal court, rather than immigration court. Immigration agents arrested Ramirez on Feb. 10 at an apartment complex where they had gone to arrest his father, a previously deported felon. Ramirez, who came to the U.S. at 7, has no criminal record and twice passed background checks to participate in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which allows young people brought to the U.S. illegally as children to stay in the country and work. Immigration officials have started deportation proceedings against him. His legal team, which includes the Los Angeles based pro-bono firm Public Counsel as well as Harvard Law professor Laurence Tribe, have pressed claims in federal court that the arrest and detention violated Ramirez's constitutional rights. They sought to keep the case out of immigration court, saying U.S. District Court was better suited to handle those claims. A federal magistrate judge in Seattle agreed to hear the constitutional claims, but declined to release him in the meantime. U.S. District Judge Ricardo Martinez upheld the decision not to release him last week, saying he instead should challenge his detention in immigration court. Martinez nevertheless said 'many questions remain regarding the appropriateness of the government's conduct' in arresting him. Among those questions, his lawyers have said, is whether U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents misinterpreted a tattoo on his forearm when they described it as a 'gang tattoo' in an arrest report. The lawyers say the tattoo, which says 'La Paz BCS,' pays homage to the city of La Paz in the Mexican state of Baja California Sur, where he was born. Ramirez's case is one of several recent arrests that have left immigration activists fearing an erosion of protections under the DACA program instituted by President Barack Obama in 2012. ICE agents in Portland, Oregon, on Sunday arrested Francisco J. Rodriguez Dominguez, a DACA participant who was brought to the U.S. from Morelia, in Mexico's Michoacan state, at age 5. Last December, he entered a diversion program following a drunken driving arrest and had attended all his court dates and required meetings, the American Civil Liberties Union of Oregon said in a statement. The agency said Monday that it targeted Rodriguez Dominguez because of the DUI and that he would be released on bond pending deportation proceedings. About 750,000 immigrants have enrolled in the DACA program since it began.