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    The deal brokered by President Donald Trump to stem job losses at a Carrier Corp. factory in Indianapolis is unusual for the state as it offers $7 million of incentives to a company still planning to cut about a third of its some 1,600 jobs. A state economic development board is scheduled to vote Tuesday on endorsing the package nearly four months after Trump celebrated his role in the negotiations with a visit to the plant. Under the deal, Carrier will keep some 800 furnace production jobs in Indiana that it had planned to eliminate. Indiana Secretary of Commerce Jim Schellinger says Trump's talks with Carrier parent company United Technologies about its federal contracts likely paid a big role in Carrier's decision.
  • Russia's energy minister says there's '94 percent' compliance on a six-month oil production cut among OPEC members and non-cartel nations, as well as discussions about continuing the cuts to boost crude prices. Alexander Novak made the comments Sunday in Kuwait at a compliance meeting. Russia's TASS news agency quoted Novak as saying discussions on extending the cuts continue. OPEC agreed in late November to cut its production by 1.2 million barrels a day, the first reduction agreed to by the cartel since 2008. Nearly a dozen other countries pledged in December to cut an additional 558,000 barrels a day. Crude oil sold for over $100 a barrel in the summer of 2014, before bottoming out below $30 a barrel in January 2016. It now trades just under $50 a barrel.
  • Iran on Sunday sanctioned what it described as 15 American companies, alleging they support terrorism, repression and Israel's occupation of land Palestinians want for a future state, likely in retaliation for sanctions earlier announced by the U.S. The wide-ranging list from an American real estate company to a major arms manufacturer appeared more symbolic than anything else as the firms weren't immediately known to be doing business anywhere in the Islamic Republic. A Foreign Ministry statement carried by the state-run IRNA news agency said the sanctions barred companies from any agreements with Iranian firms and that former and current directors would not be eligible for visas. It also said any of the company's assets in Iran could be seized. 'The sanctioned companies have, directly and/or indirectly, been involved in the brutal atrocities committed by the Zionist regime in the occupied Palestinian territories, or they have supported the regime's terrorist activities and Israel's development of Zionist settlements on the Palestinian soil,' the IRNA report said. The IRNA report referred to the sanctions as a 'reciprocal act,' without elaborating. Iran's new sanctions comes after the Trump administration in February sanctioned more than two dozen people and companies in retaliation for a recent ballistic missile test. The companies named did not immediately respond to requests for comment Sunday. They included ITT Corp., missile-maker Raytheon Co. and United Technologies Corp. Denver's Re/Max Holdings Inc., a real estate company, also made the list. Another firm on the list, truck maker Oshkosh, has worked closely with Israeli armored products maker Plasan, including on the Sand Cat armored vehicle that is used by several countries, including Israel. The Israeli Defense Ministry is reportedly seeking to buy some 200 tactical trucks from the Oshkosh, Wisconsin-based company. Kahr Arms and Magnum Research, two sanctioned firms which share the same parent company, advertise .44-caliber Magnum and .50-caliber 'Desert Eagle' pistols — a product line that previously has been made in Israel. Meanwhile, a senior Iranian lawmaker said Iran would consider a bill branding the U.S. military and the CIA as terrorist groups if the U.S. Congress passes a bill designating Iran's Revolutionary Guard a terrorist organization. Allaeddin Boroujerdi, the head of parliament's national security and foreign policy committee, was quoted by Iranian state television as saying the move to further sanction the Revolutionary Guard goes against the 2015 nuclear deal Iran reached with the United States and other world powers. The nuclear deal saw Iran agree to limit its enrichment of uranium in exchange for the lifting of some economic sanctions. In the time since, Chicago-based Boeing Co. has struck a $16.6 billion deal with Iran for passenger planes. Tehran and Washington have had no diplomatic relations since 1979, when militant students stormed the U.S. Embassy and took 52 Americans hostages for 444 days. Tensions eased slightly with the nuclear deal struck by moderate President Hassan Rouhani's administration, though hard-liners have detained those with Western ties in the time since. Sunday's sanctions announcement also comes ahead of a May presidential election in which Rouhani is expected to seek re-election. ___ Associated Press writers Jon Gambrell and Adam Schreck in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, contributed to this report.
  • Westminster Bridge attacker Khalid Masood sent a WhatsApp message that cannot be accessed because it was encrypted by the popular messaging service, a top British security official said Sunday. British press reports suggest Masood used the messaging service owned by Facebook just minutes before starting a rampage Wednesday that left three pedestrians and one police officer dead and dozens more wounded, including some with catastrophic injuries. Home Secretary Amber Rudd used appearances on BBC and Sky News to urge WhatsApp and other encrypted services to make their platforms accessible to intelligence services and police trying to carrying out lawful eavesdropping. 'We need to make sure that organizations like WhatsApp — and there are plenty of others like that — don't provide a secret place for terrorists to communicate with each other,' she said. Rudd did not provide any details about Masood's use of WhatsApp, saying only 'this terrorist sent a WhatsApp message and it can't be accessed.' But her call for a 'back door' system to allow authorities to retrieve information is likely to meet resistance from the tech industry, which has faced previous law enforcement demands for access to data after major attacks. In the United States, Apple fought the FBI's request for the passcodes needed to unlock an iPhone that had been used by one of the perpetrators in the 2015 extremist attack in San Bernardino, California. The FBI initially claimed it could obtain the data only with Apple's help, but ultimately found another way to hack into the locked phone. Masood drove a rented SUV into pedestrians on Westminster Bridge before smashing it into Parliament's gates and rushing onto the grounds, where he stabbed a policeman to death before he was shot dead. A detailed police reconstruction has found the entire attack lasted 82 seconds. Police are trying to pinpoint his motive and identify any possible accomplices, making the WhatsApp message a potential clue to his state of mind and his social media contacts. Rudd said attacks like Masood's would be easier to prevent if authorities could penetrate encrypted services after obtaining warrants similar to the ones used to listen in on telephone calls or — in snail mail days — to steam open letters and read their contents. Without a change in the system, she said terrorists would be able to communicate with each other without fear of being overheard even in cases where a legal warrant has been obtained. Rudd also urged technology companies to do a better job at preventing the publication of material that promotes extremism. She plans to meet with firms Thursday about setting up an industry board that would take steps to make the web less useful to extremists. British police investigating the attack say they still believe Masood, a 52-year-old Briton, acted alone and say they have no indications that further attacks are planned. Metropolitan Police Deputy Assistant Commissioner Neil Basu said it may never be possible to fully determine Masood's motives. 'That understanding may have died with him,' Basu said Saturday night as police appealed for people who knew Masood or saw him to contact investigators. 'Even if he acted alone in the preparation, we need to establish with absolute clarity why he did these unspeakable acts, to bring reassurance to Londoners.' The Islamic State group, which is losing territory in Iraq and Syria but still has radical followers in other parts of the world, has claimed Masood was a 'soldier' carrying out its wishes to attack Western countries. Masood had convictions for violent crimes in the U.K. and spent time in prison. He also worked in Saudi Arabia teaching English for two years and traveled there again in 2015 on a visa designed for religious pilgrimages. One 58-year-old man remains in custody in the case after being arrested in Birmingham, where Masood had been living. He has not been charged or named. Nine others arrested after the assault have been freed without charges and one has been freed on bail. The family of slain police officer Keith Palmer, meanwhile, released a statement thanking those who tried to save his life. 'There was nothing more you could have done. You did your best and we are just grateful he was not alone,' the statement said.
  • Spanish police have arrested two men for allegedly transporting large quantities of cocaine inside fake bananas. Spain's civil guard made the arrests Sunday after an investigation was started in November when agents discovered the drugs in a shipment of bananas. Among the real bananas, police found 57 fake bananas made of resin that were stuffed with 7 kilograms (15.4 pounds) of cocaine. Another 10 kilograms (22pounds) of cocaine were hidden inside the flaps of the cardboard boxes that carried the fruit. The police bust took place in the coastal cities of Valencia and Malaga. The two men charged with trafficking drugs and belonging to a criminal organization are Spanish. Police say they are investigating a third man, who is Italian.
  • Now that spring is here, you might be thinking about tackling home improvement projects. Whether it’s a new deck or a remodel of your kitchen, you’ll need to figure out how to pay for the work. And if you’re taking on these projects yourself instead of hiring a contractor, you may be headed to your local hardware store. If you’re debating between Home Depot or Lowe’s for supplies, perhaps considering their different financing options may help in your decision-making process. (Before you look for financing options, it’s a good idea to take a look at your credit to see how it’s doing and what terms and conditions you may qualify for. You can check two of your credit scores for free on Credit.com.) Home Depot Consumer Credit Card With the Home Depot consumer credit card (which you can read a full review of here), you will receive 0% financing for six months on any purchase of $299 or more. After the promotional period ends, the annual percentage rate (APR) will change to a variable rate of 17.99%, 21.99%, 25.99% or 26.99%, depending on your creditworthiness. There is no annual fee with this card, but it charges deferred interest, calculated from the purchase date if you don’t pay your balance in full by the end of the promotional period. Home Depot Project Loan If you need a longer window to pay off your project, especially if you’re doing a large project (think projects like entire room remodels or additions), a Home Depot project loan could be another option. You can borrow up to $55,000 and have up to 84 months to pay off the loan. The first six months are considered a purchasing period during which you only pay interest on the amount borrowed, based on a 7.99% APR. The APR stays the same after this introductory period, but you’ll start to pay off the balance in monthly installments as well. Why You Might Choose Home Depot Financing The options at Home Depot and Lowe’s are similar, but there are key differences that could push you in either direction, depending on your preferences. With the Home Depot consumer credit card, there will be times throughout the year when Home Depot offers extended promotional financing beyond the standard six months. Some offers could be as long as 24 months. If you make your purchase during this period, you’ll have more time to pay for your project with no interest. Lowe’s Consumer Credit Card When using the Lowe’s consumer credit card there are a few options. You can either elect to receive a 5% discount on your purchase or special financing on purchases of $299 or more. One special financing option is to receive 0% APR for six months. If you go this route you will be charge deferred interest if the balance is not paid by the end of the six-month period. If you think you will need more time, you can choose to borrow for up to 84 months with a fixed 7.99% APR. Just be aware that if you take advantage of the special financing offers, you will not be able to receive the 5% off offer as well. Why You Might Choose Lowe’s Financing If you don’t need special financing and just want a discount, the Lowe’s consumer credit card might be the best choice. Because you can earn 5% off every purchase, the overall cost of your project could be considerably reduced. Alternatives to Home Depot or Lowe’s Financing If you want to earn rewards for your purchases or extend the 0% APR period, you might want to consider a credit card instead. Here are a couple of options. Chase Freedom Card This card allows you to earn rewards on purchases and offers an introductory 0% APR for 15 months on purchases and balance transfers. After the introductory period, the APR will change to a variable 15.49% to 24.24%. When you sign up for the card, you receive a $150 bonus after you spend $500 within the first three months. The card also comes with rotating 5% cash back categories each quarter. There is a limit of $1,500 per quarter on bonuses, which typically include home improvement stores once a year. All other purchases earn 1% back. This card comes with no annual fee. Citi Simplicity If you want to boost the time you have to pay off your home improvement project, the Citi Simplicity card might be an option. With this card, you receive an introductory 0% APR for 21 months on purchases and balance transfers. Once the introductory period is over, the APR changes to a variable 14.24% to 24.24%. This card also comes with no annual fee and will not charge a late fee. Looking for more ways to spruce up your house? Check out our annual homeowner to-do list. Note: It’s important to remember that interest rates, fees and terms for credit cards, loans and other financial products frequently change. As a result, rates, fees and terms for credit cards, loans and other financial products cited in these articles may have changed since the date of publication. Please be sure to verify current rates, fees and terms with credit card issuers, banks or other financial institutions directly. Related Articles The Best Cash-Back Credit Cards in America What Is a Charge Card vs. Credit Card? This article originally appeared on Credit.com.
  • French voters just won't tolerate corruption in politics anymore — that appears to be the message from the swift downfall of the country's powerful security minister. It's a notable shift from the past, when influence peddling seemed endemic and politicians untouchable, even when they were accused of shocking scandals. The change is the result of an aggressive new financial prosecutor, an unprecedented anti-corruption drive by President Francois Hollande, and growing public frustration with a political establishment seen as intent on enriching itself even as ordinary people suffer. Hollande on Thursday inaugurated the French anti-corruption agency, a public organization focusing on business activity — the latest move in government efforts to fight corruption. Five years ago, Hollande campaigned on the promise to make the French Republic 'exemplary.' He probably didn't think he would have so much clean up to do in his own camp. Former Interior Minister Bruno Le Roux on Tuesday became the fifth minister to quit the Socialist government over financial wrongdoing allegations. Prosecutors opened an investigation into a report that he hired his two daughters for some two dozen temporary parliamentary jobs, starting when they were 15 and 16 years old. The case comes as France's electoral campaign is being affected by a string of corruption scandals ahead of the country's two-round presidential election on April 23 and May 7. The conservative candidate Francois Fillon is the target an investigation into allegations that he gave his wife and two children government-funded jobs which they never did. Fillon suggested Thursday that Hollande would intervene in legal cases to try to discredit political rivals. Hollande vigorously denounced those allegations as false and insisted he has never intervened in any judicial procedure. Fillon, once considered the presidential front-runner, has sunk in polls following the press' first revelations about the jobs in January. Since then, allegations have come out that Fillon was also given suits worth more than 48,000 euros ($52,000) over the past five years — including two suits worth 13,000 euros ($14,000) last month. Judges are also investigating whether Fillon and his wife committed fraud and forgery in a cover-up attempt. His supporters insist the principle of presumption of innocence should protect their candidate. Far-right leader Marine Le Pen and some members of her anti-EU, anti-immigrant National Front party are also targeted in several ongoing investigations. Polls suggest that Le Pen and independent centrist Emmanuel Macron are the two top contenders in the election. The top two vote-getters on April 23 will compete in a presidential runoff on May 7. For the first time in the country's history, the declarations of assets of all the presidential candidates were published this week on the High authority for the transparency of public life's website. Hollande's term was tarnished from the start with scandals — the biggest one concerning former budget minister Jerome Cahuzac. Cahuzac acknowledged owning illegal foreign bank accounts for two decades in March 2013, after denying and publicly lying for months. He was sentenced last year to three years in prison. He has appealed the decision. Cahuzac's case prompted the creation of the new position of a national financial prosecutor three years ago to focus on complex cases of serious economic and financial crime. The government also passed a law in 2013 to force ministers and parliamentarians to declare their assets and avoid any conflict of interest. The same year, another bill tightened France's legal arsenal to fight tax fraud and evasion. In addition to Le Roux and Cahuzac, three lower-profile ministers were forced to quit Hollande's government in the same circumstances, including junior minister for foreign trade Thomas Thevenoud who resigned in 2014 because he was named in an inquiry into tax fraud. He goes on trial next month. 'French people want exemplary attitude from their political leaders,' said French Socialist environment minister Segolene Royal, who also noted the consequences of corruption on France's image abroad. '(We are) the country of human rights, a country of law. We need to watch our behavior.' Hollande's strong stance on fighting corruption and financial wrongdoing is a marked contrast with his predecessors' attitudes. Former conservative President Nicolas Sarkozy is facing legal troubles. An investigation is underway over allegations that he received millions of euros in illegal financing from the late Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi's regime for his winning 2007 presidential campaign. Prosecutors also want him and 13 others sent to trial for another campaign financing case involving his failed 2012 presidential bid. He has denied any wrongdoing. Jacques Chirac, the French president from 1995-2007, was given in 2011 a two-year suspended sentence for embezzling public funds while he was mayor of Paris.
  • Americans who have benefited from the Affordable Care Act are feeling some relief at the failure of Republican efforts to repeal it, but they face new anxieties with President Donald Trump tweeting that 'ObamaCare will explode.' Premiums have risen and major insurers have backed out of the state markets where people can buy insurance online under Obama's signature health care law. But people who say it saved their lives or helped them start a business want lawmakers to fix these problems, not encourage them. 'It does need its fixes, I totally see that,' said Inge Hafkemeyer, 57, who credits the law's subsidies for containing her costs as her home-based event-planning business took off in Mission, Kansas, a Kansas City suburb. 'But if your roof leaks, you don't burn down the house to fix it.' Clare Schexnyder, 49, is convinced she's alive today because of it. As a small business owner in Decatur, Georgia, she couldn't afford health insurance until the rollout in 2013. She began getting mammograms, and her breast cancer was spotted in time. Her double mastectomy and reconstruction surgery was priced at $250,000, but she paid no more than her $6,200 annual deductible. Then, her daughter spent a week in the hospital after her appendix burst, costing them another $6,200. They took out a second mortgage to pay the bills. 'An appendectomy shouldn't have to make me refinance my house,' she said. 'It's still not a perfect system by any means, but I'm glad we have it.' Schexnyder's insurer pulled out of the Affordable Care Act last year, leaving fewer alternatives in Georgia, one of the states that refused to set up insurance exchanges or participate in Medicaid expansion. But she objects to tweets like this one Trump sent on Saturday: 'ObamaCare will explode and we will all get together and piece together a great healthcare plan for THE PEOPLE. Do not worry.' 'They're setting it up to fail, which is irresponsible and unforgiveable,' Schexnyder said. Shannon Henson, a 49-year-old unemployed conference planner in the Kansas City suburb of Independence, Missouri, said the Affordable Care Act has been a good starting point. 'It wasn't going to be perfect from the get-go,' she said. Republican promises to repeal and replace the law foundered on Friday when House Speaker Paul Ryan abruptly pulled the party's health care bill to avoid almost certain defeat. 'We're going to be living with Obamacare for the foreseeable future,' Ryan, R-Wis., told reporters. The law has covered more than 20 million people who were previously uninsured through private insurance sold on the law's marketplaces and by expanding Medicaid, the health program designed to help poor Americans. It required insurers to cover 'essential' services, including mammograms, and barred them from refusing policies to the very sick or others with pre-existing health conditions. But premiums jumped by double digits this year as the cost of medical care and prescription drugs continues to soar, and the marketplaces created by the law are short on the healthy consumers who make insurance companies profitable. In about one-third of U.S. counties, consumers in the individual markets don't have a choice of plans. Mina Viladas, 53, of Fairfield, Connecticut, said she was covered under the Affordable Care Act when she needed emergency surgery. But the self-employed fitness trainer said the insurance plans are getting more expensive. 'The Democrats need to work on improving it, with the Republicans, if possible,' she said. 'But I'm happy it's still where it is because it's saved me.' ___ Thanawala reported from San Mateo, Calif. Associated Press writers Pat Eaton-Robb in Bridgeport, Conn. and Jim Suhr in Kansas City contributed to this report.
  • Nissan is recalling more than 56,000 cars because of power steering hoses that may leak fluid and potentially lead to fires. Nissan North America says the recall affects the 2013-2014 Murano vehicles. It says the problem stems from the power steering hose clamp, which may not adequately secure the hose. That could allow the hose to detach and leak power steering fluid. That could lead to a fire If it leaks onto a hot engine or exhaust pipes, the company said. Nissan says dealers will install a new power steering high pressure hose kit, free of charge. Car owners can contact Nissan customer service at 1-800-647-7261 or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 or visit www.safercar.gov.
  • Police in Monaco say robbers have carried out an armed heist at a luxurious Cartier jewelry shop in Monte Carlo and one of the suspects has been captured. The Monegasque police authority said three individuals carrying at least one firearm targeted the shop Saturday afternoon near the famed casino square in the French principality. Police say the robbers fled and set fire to their getaway car. One of the armed men was caught by police who closed the principality's borders but the two others managed to escape. Police were unable to specify what the robbers had stolen or how valuable it was. Police say no shots were fired, no injuries reported and no hostages were taken in the robbery but some Cartier shop assistants have been given psychological counseling.

News

  • Thousands of people crowded into Moscow's Pushkin Square on Sunday for an unsanctioned protest against the Russian government, the biggest gathering in a wave of nationwide protests that were the most extensive show of defiance in years. Alexei Navalny, the anti-corruption campaigner who is leading the opposition to President Vladimir Putin, was arrested while walking from a nearby subway station to the demonstration at Moscow's iconic Pushkin Square. Navalny and his Foundation for Fighting Corruption had called for the protests, which attracted hundreds or thousands in most sizeable Russian cities, from the Far East port of Vladivostok to the European heartland including St. Petersburg. The protests were the largest coordinated outpourings of dissatisfaction in Russia since the massive 2011-12 demonstrations that followed a fraud-tainted parliamentary election. Police estimated the Moscow crowd at about 7,000, but it could have been larger. The one-hectare (2.5-acre) Pushkin Square was densely crowded as were sidewalks on the adjacent Tverskaya Street. State news agency Tass cited Moscow police as saying about 200 people were arrested. Russia's beleaguered opposition is often seen as primarily a phenomenon of a Westernized urban elite, but Sunday's protests included gatherings in places far from cosmopolitan centers, such as Siberia's Chita and Barnaul. 'Navalny has united people who think the same; that people don't agree with the authorities is obvious from what is going on in the country today,' Anna Ivanova, 19, said at the Moscow demonstration. 'I am a bit scared.' Scuffles with police erupted sporadically and the arrested demonstrators included a gray-haired man whom police dragged along the pavement. Police cleared the square after about three hours and began herding demonstrators down side streets. 'It's scary, but if everyone is afraid, no one would come out onto the streets,' Yana Aksyonova, 19, said. The protests Sunday focused on reports by Navalny's group claiming that Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev has amassed a collection of mansions, yachts and vineyards. The alleged luxuries include a house for raising ducks, so many placards in Sunday's protests featured mocking images of yellow duck toys. 'People are unhappy with the fact that there's been no investigation' of the corruption allegations, said Moscow protester Ivan Gronstein. In the Pacific port city of Vladivostok, police forcefully detained some demonstrators near the city's railway terminal, in one case falling down a small grassy slope as they wrestled with a detainee. News reports and social media reported demonstrations in large cities throughout the country, including Novosibirsk, Tomsk and Krasnoyarsk. At least 25 people were reported arrested in Vladivostok and 12 in Khabarovsk. Some demonstrators showed up with their faces painted green, a reference to a recent attack on Navalny in which an assailant threw a green antiseptic liquid onto his face.
  • Knoxville Zoo officials are investigating why 33 reptiles, including three endangered species, died Wednesday.  Herpetologists came to work that morning to find a majority of the 52 animals housed in one of the reptile buildings dead. They immediately evacuated the snakes and lizards, giving them oxygen and checking their heartbeats with an ultrasound device. “This is a devastating and catastrophic loss to our zoo,” Lisa New, president at the zoo, told the Knoxville News Sentinel Saturday. “These animals were important ambassadors who helped so many people understand the role snakes and lizards play in the balance of nature.” >> Read more trending news Veterinarians from the zoo as well as from the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine are investigating the cause of death. “We also lost breeding programs for several endangered and threatened species,” she added. “It is especially difficult for our herpetologists who have dedicated their careers to caring for and advocating for these animals.” Three critically endangered species died; the Louisiana pine snake, the Catalina Island rattlesnake and the Aruba Island rattlesnake. The zoo’s forest cobra and albino Eastern diamondback rattlesnake also died. “We don't know exactly what occurred to cause this terrible event, but we do know it was isolated to a single building,” the zoo said in a post on Facebook. “We are continuing to investigate all the physical systems and conducting necropsies to see if we can gain any insight.”
  • The pilot of a single-engine plane that crashed into a Marietta house has been identified, officials say. Robert George Westlake, 78, of Atlanta, was killed Friday evening, when a Cessna Citation I aircraft went down near a home in the 100 block of Vistawood Drive in Marietta, Cobb County police spokesman Sgt. Dana Pierce said. No one else was on board. This was the third time in less than six weeks that federal officials investigated a deadly plane crash in or near metro Atlanta. The 1976 plane was en route to Fulton County Airport from Cincinnati, Ohio, Pierce said. Westlake radioed that he was having mechanical troubles moments before the crash, Pierce said. RELATED: Pilot killed after plane crashes near Cobb County house Flames from the crash spread to the home, setting it on fire, Channel 2 Action News reported. The residents, Norm and Barbara Keller, were at church at the time of the crash. No injuries were reported from the fire. 'From what it looks like at this point, it came over from the top of the house and landed in the front yard,' Danell Boyd of the Cobb County fire department told Channel 2. The crash site is near Kennesaw State University’s Fifth Third Bank Stadium and Town Center at Cobb. Smoke was visible from the stadium. Witnesses said the plane nose-dived to the ground, Channel 2 reported.  'I heard a swoosh and then a clap and an explosion and I pretty much knew before I looked outside that it was a plane crash,' said Joe Thomas, a resident in the area. The neighborhood will be blocked off while National Transportation Safety Board investigators look into the crash. On Feb. 16, a plane crash at the Barrow County airport killed two people on board. On March 4, the pilot was killed when a plane went down near the Cherokee County airport.
  • A private central Florida elephant preserve offers a unique, hands-on experience to visitors. The Elephant Ranch allows tourists to get up close and personal with the majestic animals. >> Read more trending news The Two Tails Ranch located near Gainesville lets people feed, bathe and even ride the eight elephants living at the ranch. The nonprofit group All About Elephants, Inc. owns and runs the ranch with an objective of teaching people about pachyderms. It was founded in 2008 “to start educational programs for private sectors and professionals to learn about elephants.” The organizations said it has helped more than 250 elephants over the years. “Some stayed temporarily while their own exhibits were being remodeled or built. Others stayed for retirement, medical needs, behavior problems or even emergencies after hurricanes destroyed their zoos,” the company said on its website. The ranch focuses on elephants, but it houses other exotic animals, as well, including a pair of zebras, African spurthighed tortoises, red foot tortoises, an ostrich, emu and a camel. Shelby Lin Erdman contributed to this report.