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College

    The SEC released its 2018 football schedules for all 14 schools Tuesday. The schedule includes 56 SEC games across 13 weeks. It will begin the weekend of Sept. 1 with 14 games, including five at neutral sites, and conclude with the championship game Dec. 1 at Mercedes-Benz Stadium. Each team will play eight conference games (six in division).  UGA’s four true road games will be SEC contests at South Carolina, Missouri, LSU and Kentucky. Its game with South Carolina has returned to its normal Week 2 slot after it was the Bulldogs’ third and sixth games in 2015 and 2016 and is scheduled as the ninth game this season. The Bulldogs’ trip to LSU will be their first since 2008 because of the SEC’s interdivision rotation schedule. Georgia will open against Austin Peay, the schools’ first meeting, and will also face Massachusetts on Nov. 17 as part of a football and basketball agreement.  Other SEC highlights include LSU-Miami (Arlington, Texas), Auburn-Washington (Mercedes-Benz Stadium) and Alabama-Louisville (Orlando) matchups as neutral-site games during the opening weekend. Florida will face former Georgia offensive coordinator Mike Bobo and Colorado State on Sept. 15 as part of the agreement to hire Jim McElwain from the Rams. Texas A&M will host Clemson in Week 2. Rivalry weekend, as always, will close the season on the weekend of Nov. 24. The games include Georgia-Georgia Tech, Auburn-Alabama, Florida-Florida State, Clemson-South Carolina and Tennessee-Vanderbilt, among others. Georgia’s 2018 football schedule (Home games in BOLD) Sept. 1, vs. Austin Peay GovernorsSept. 8, at South Carolina GamecocksSept. 15, vs. Middle Tennessee Blue RaidersSept. 22, at Missouri TigersSept. 29, vs. Tennessee VolunteersOct. 6, vs. Vanderbilt CommodoresOct. 13, at LSU TigersOct. 20 OFFOct. 27, Florida Gators (at Jacksonville, Fla.)Nov. 3, at Kentucky WildcatsNo. 10, vs. Auburn TigersNov. 17, vs. UMass MinutemenNov. 24, vs. Georgia Tech Yellow JacketsDec. 1, SEC Championship Game (at Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Atlanta)  
  • Georgia took on an FCS school Saturday night at Sanford Stadium and came away with a 42-14 victory against Samford, a win led by star running back Nick Chubb. Here are three things to know about the victory: GROUND GAME Most of the halftime stats were even, but Georgia led 21-7. The reason for the big lead was that Georgia held a huge advantage in an important category: the run game.  In the first half, Georgia outgained Samford 161 yards to 11. Georgia’s yards came on 26 carries and Samford’s on 10. Chubb gained 108, including a 32-yard run for a touchdown.  Georgia’s run game dominance continued in the second half. In the first 15 minutes, the Bulldogs gained 93 yards on 16 carries, building their game total to 254 yards on 42 carries and three touchdowns. Samford went backward in the third quarter, rushing for minus-13 yards on seven carries.  Chubb’s night ended after he scored a touchdown to cap the Bulldogs’ first possession of the third quarter. His final tally was 131 yards on 16 carries and touchdowns of 32 and 14 yards. The Bulldogs finished the game with 284 yards on 54 carries, 5.3 yards per run. Samford finished with 22 yards on 23 carries.  QUICK-STRIKE SCORING DRIVES The Bulldogs began the game with a drive that stalled on Samford’s 44 on the Dogs’ first possession. Georgia scored touchdowns on six of its next nine possessions, and four consecutive drives took less than two minutes each.   The Bulldogs’ second drive covered 79 yards on two plays, in 27 seconds. The final play was a 32-yard run by Chubb. A 47-yard catch by Riley Ridley preceded that play. Georgia’s next drive covered 54 yards in three plays and lasted 1 minutes, 34 seconds. It ended with a 51-yard touchdown catch by Terry Godwin.   The next time the Dogs had the ball, they scored on a drive that covered 26 yards on four plays and lasted 1:56. That one ended on a 14-yard run by Chubb. After that came a four-play, 45-yard drive that was over in 1:07. Godwin ended it with a 9-yard touchdown catch. The play was set up by Godwin’s 32-yard catch.  INSIDE THE STATS Godwin paced Georgia’s receivers, with 98 receiving yards on four catches. Five other receivers had a catch apiece. Quarterback Jake Fromm was 8-of-13 passing for 165 yards and three touchdowns. His passer rating was 244.3. Backup Brice Ramsey completed one pass of two attempts, for 10 yards.  Georgia used four running backs other than Chubb. D’Andre Swift gained 54 yards on nine carries and Brian Herrien 45 yards on nine carries. Swift scored one touchdown, an 11-yard run. Elijah Holyfield gained 28 yards on eight carries, and walk-on Prather Hudson gained 15 on six carries.  Georgia outgained Samford 459 yards to 249 and led in time of possession, 35:11 to 24:49.
  • Georgia fans long will remember Terry Godwin’s one-handed touchdown grab at Notre Dame. But they may not recall the drop that came before it. Receiver Javon Wims is beginning to fulfill his physical promise. Two games in, he leads the team with five catches for 116 yards. But it was a misplayed ball that could’ve put Wims in the fans’ doghouse. Just before Godwin’s snag Saturday in Georgia’s 20-19 victory against the Fighting Irish, Wims dropped a crucial second-down pass. He’s appreciative that Godwin bailed him out. “I just misjudged it,” Wims said. “I should’ve caught it. … Thank God my boy Terry, he made it up with a great catch.” In Year 2 at UGA, Wims hopes to be a go-to target for freshman quarterback Jake Fromm. That means hauling in all the passes in his vicinity, including the one he missed Saturday night. “We just tell ourselves we have to make every play for him,” he said. “Any ball that’s up in the air we have to try to make it. It may not be perfect or it may be perfect. You just have to try and catch the ball for him, especially as a freshman. That boosts his confidence.” Wims speaks with wisdom and clarity that’s rare with young athletes. Perhaps his last half-decade has a role in that. Growing up a basketball player in Miami Gardens, Fla., Wims rediscovered football his senior year at Ed White High School in Jacksonville, Fla. He hadn’t played since his Pop Warner days. He received one college offer – Elon, but he didn’t meet the required test score, according to his father – and ended up at NAIA Belhaven University. Wims was raw, four inches shorter, overcoming asthma and stuck in a Wing-T offense. Still, he felt he had the talent to be an NFL player and wanted to prove it. The NFL aspirations largely were rooted from his father’s advice. Football wasn’t Wims’ first love, but his father, Roy, told him he was more unique to one sport than the other, and no stones should be left unturned. “He just told me something that stuck with me,” Wims said. “There are a lot of (6-foot-4) point guards out there that do everything that you do, but there are not a lot of 6-4 receivers that can do what you can do.” But Wims’ goal couldn’t be achieved at Belhaven, he decided. He fractured his foot six games into the season, then left the team and returned to Jacksonville. After a season away, Wims enrolled at Hinds Junior College in Raymond, Miss., a necessary step to revive his football life. That decision immediately gave him some level of regret. “I stepped out the door and I was like, ‘I don’t know where I’m at. I’m in the middle of fields and cows,’” Wims said. “I didn’t know where I was at, but at the same time I’m glad that happened because I learned a lot about myself.” Wims developed as a receiver in Raymond. He realized his perceived potential with four multi-touchdown games in 2015. He caught at least six passes in five games, a far cry from his high school days. “The coaches did a very good job there developing me at JUCO,” Wims said. “Especially my position coach, coach (Dwike) Wilson, he did an outstanding job with everything that he instilled in me. Coaches here just brought it out in me and picked up where he left off.” Ranked among the best junior colleges in the nation, Wims received a scholarship offer from the Bulldogs around Thanksgiving. Two years later, he made up for his drop with a key 31-yard catch in South Bend, helping Georgia to its win.  Wims has found the place he belongs. And he’s developed a rapport with friends Fromm and Godwin. So much that after a practice, he competed with Godwin to see who could replicate his end-zone catch the quickest. It took about 10 attempts to declare a winner. But the result had Wims grinning. “It was pretty hard,” Wims said. “We could have easily caught it with one hand, but to try to do it exactly. … Both of us (eventually) caught it. But I caught it before Terry.”
  • Should college athletes be paid beyond their full scholarship? The results of an August poll by the Washington Post and the University of Massachusetts Lowell show a racial divide in the answer to that question. >> Read more trending news When coaches are being paid millions, and sports facilities cost tens of millions, some say athletes should also be compensated. Although 52 percent of Americans believe a scholarship is enough, 54 percent of black Americans said they believe athletes should be paid based on the revenue they generate.  'The schools are making an awful lot of money, and the coaches are making millions and millions of dollars, and they're (the players) the ones bringing in the money, really,' one black respondent said. But whites see things differently.  'The whole reason they go to college is to get an education, and a scholarship should be enough,' a white nurse said. 'They shouldn't be paid to play football.' The majority of whites who took the poll agreed with her. Take an in-depth look at what some economists and labor lawyers call a critical problem with college sports on myajc.com
  • When Georgia players were celebrating their 20-19 win over Notre Dame on Saturday night, outside linebacker Davin Bellamy was seen parading around with golden spikes on his shoulders. What was the deal with that? Now the story can be told: They’re a reward for forcing turnovers. Bellamy had the sack and forced fumble on Notre Dame to seal the victory. “It’s a little thing we have for turnovers. When you get the ball off somebody, you get the spikes,” said fellow outside linebacker Lorenzo Carter, who recovered that fumble. “We have the UGA spike squad that’s at the games. (Defensive coordinator Mel) Tucker came up with it, try to get us little incentives for getting the ball off people.” Carter got to wear the spikes earlier in the second half, when he sack-stripped Notre Dame quarterback Brandon Wimbush and recovered the fumble. While Bellamy got to wear the spikes after the game, since it was over, Carter only got to wear them on the sidelines until the next defensive series. “Once you go back on the field, the spikes come off and it’s time to go,” Carter said. So essentially it’s the same idea as the Tennessee trash can, where the Volunteers put footballs after a turnover. That gimmick was much derided on social media, what with Vols coach Butch Jones and the “champions of life” stuff. As good as Carter’s sack-forced fumble-recovery was, it could have been better: He was trying to pick up the ball and return it. Carter, showing good awareness, can be seen on replay getting his knees off the ground before reaching down to grab the football, so he wouldn’t be ruled down when he grabbed it. But Wimbush was also reaching for it. “Everything happened so fast. Once I finally realized the ball was right there I was trying to get the ball and go,” Carter said. “But yeah, I gotta get on the ball. Once I realized I was down I said, All right lemme get this ball, make sure what’s important.”
  • Georgia Tech’s game against UCF this Saturday in Orlando, Fla., has been canceled due to effects of Hurricane Irma. The decision was confirmed by a Tech spokesman. The game will not be made up this year. The schools have a two-game contract, with the return game at Tech scheduled for 2020. Tech’s next game will be its ACC opener Sept. 23 against Pittsburgh at Bobby Dodd Stadium. Tech cited two primary reasons for canceling the game. First, in response to Florida Gov. Rick Scott’s call for public universities to assist with hurricane preparation and recovery efforts, UCF agreed to host 1,000 National Guard members and 250 vehicles on its campus. For an operation of that size, UCF’s Spectrum Stadium was deemed the best place to stage recovery operations. Second, many UCF team members evacuated the Orlando area, and with the campus closed through Wednesday, there was uncertainty about if and when the team could reconvene to practice. “We are in complete agreement with the decision to cancel Saturday’s game,” Georgia Tech athletic director Todd Stansbury, who served as UCF’s A.D. from 2012-15, said in a statement. “While we’re disappointed for both teams’ student-athletes, coaches and fans, recovering from the effects of Hurricane Irma should be and is the top priority for UCF and the entire state of Florida at this time. We wish them the very best in their recovery efforts and look forward to meeting on the gridiron down the road.” Officials from both schools looked into playing the game later in the year, but the fact that the schools do not share a mutual open date made that a logistical impossibility. This will be the second game in a row that UCF will have cancelled. The Knights’ game against Memphis, also in Orlando, was cancelled. The game had been in doubt with the heavy winds and rain causing both campuses to close, as well as damage inflicted upon property in the Orlando area. Tech’s campus is closed Monday and UCF’s campus closed through Wednesday. This will be Tech’s first game canceled since its 2000 season opener at Virginia Tech was never played due to lightning. In 2001, after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Tech’s game against Florida State to be played that week was postponed until the end of the regular season. Such a move this year would not be feasible because both the American Athletic Conference and ACC championship games take place on Dec. 2, the Saturday after the end of the regular season. Check back for more information.
  • SACK SECURES VICTORY Notre Dame had a first-and-10 at its 36-yard line when Georgia outside linebacker Davin Bellamy sacked Fighting Irish quarterback Brandon Wimbush for a loss of nine yards with 1:27 to play in the game. The ball came loose on the play, and Lorenzo Carter, Georgia’s other outside linebacker, recovered the fumble. Georgia then ran out the clock on a 20-19 victory. Carter had a sack and recovered fumble late in the third quarter.   What Kirby Smart said after win over Notre Dame GO-AHEAD FIELD GOAL Notre Dame took a 19-17 lead on a field goal with 10:21 to play in the fourth quarter, and after each team had a three-and-out, Georgia took over on its 25-yard line with 6:47 left in regulation. Georgia drove 63 yards on nine plays on a drive that ended with a 29-yard field goal by Rodrigo Blankenship. Nick Chubb started the drive with a 12-yard run, but the key play was a 31-yard pass from freshman quarterback Jake Fromm to Javon Wims that put the Bulldogs on the Notre Dame 17.  SLOPPY GAME The teams committed 20 penalties combined for 190 yards. Georgia had 12 of them for 127 yards. Each team committed penalties that extended drives for the opponent and set up scores. One of the costlier penalties on Georgia occurred on a kickoff return in the first quarter. After Notre Dame ended its first drive with a field goal, Elijah Holyfield returned the ensuing kickoff 91 yards to the Notre Dame 4, but Jarvis Wilson was called for a holding on a player who was behind Holyfield at the time of the hold. Also, the teams combined to commit three turnovers. 
  • Georgia Tech president Dr. G.P. “Bud” Peterson, athletic director Todd Stansbury and football coach Paul Johnson extended invitations to those displaced by Hurricane Irma to attend Saturday’s football game against Jacksonville State, the Institute announced on Friday.  What you need to know about Tech vs. Jacksonville State Residents of counties in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina that are under evacuation can claim tickets for themselves and immediate family members with a valid state-issued ID on the Brittain Dining Hall lawn beginning on Saturday at 9:30 a.m.  Brittain Dining Hall is located on Techwood Drive, directly across from Gate 9 at Bobby Dodd Stadium. Tickets will be distributed on a first-come, first-served basis. Latest updates on Hurricane Irma “As a former resident of both Houston and Florida, my wife, Karen, and I personally have a lot of friends, former student-athletes and former colleagues in both areas and have been following Hurricanes Harvey and Irma closely...” Stansbury said in a statement. “Our hope is that a day of family fun and great college football can be a much-needed distraction for families displaced by Irma. Additionally, Georgia Tech athletics will be looking to help those affected in any way that we can.” Georgia Tech kicks off against Jacksonville State at 12:30 p.m. at Bobby Dodd Stadium. The Atlanta Braves also have offered free tickets to hurricane evacuees.  
  • ATHENS — Georgia appears to be preparing to start redshirt freshman Solomon Kindley in Saturday’s showdown at Notre Dame. Senior cornerback Aaron Davis, on the other hand, still appears to be a question mark.          Both players missed part or all of the season opener because of injuries, and both were categorized as hopeful for Saturday when this week began. But Kindley appears to be closer.          Kindley (ankle injury) was once again working with the first team at right guard drills on Wednesday. The rest of the line was as its been this week, with junior Kendall Baker at left guard.          If Baker starts, it would be the first start of his college career. He played both guard spots in the opener. Pat Allen, who started the opener at left guard, continues to work at second team. Dyshon Sims, who started at right guard, is also with the second team.          As for Davis (hamstring), he was doing some but not all work. The senior went through one drill, hitting a blocking sled with full ferocity, then sat out another, consulting briefly with head athletic trainer Ron Courson before returning to action.          Davis did appear to be doing more than he had in previous practices. “He’s been great, working hard and continuing to push,” head coach Kirby Smart said after Tuesday’s practice. “We could really use him. He’s getting reps.”          Sophomore Tyrique McGhee took Davis’ place in the lineup at left cornerback last Saturday. Senior Malkom Parrish, a starter the past two seasons, continues to be out after foot surgery in mid-August.          Like Davis, freshman receiver J.J. Holloman has also been dealing with a hamstring injury, which limited his action in the opener. Holloman continues to sit out some drills during media viewing periods, but Smart remains hopeful that he can play. Holloman, who enrolled in January, was a potentially key piece of the receiver rotation.          “The time he missed from the hamstring hurt him mentally, not physically,” Smart said. “He’s a guy that when he figures it out – he’s a great kid, he works really hard. He’s got a great physical presence and a great target. He’s just got to get comfortable. He’s going through what some of those guys – Riley, Tyler – went through last year.”          Georgia practiced Wednesday in its indoor facility, as there was some rain in the area. The team leaves Friday for South Bend.     The post             Georgia practice report: Solomon Kindley, Aaron Davis and J.J. Holloman appeared first on             DawgNation.         
  • The first game of Kirby Smart’s second season at Georgia is in the books, a 31-10 win at home against Appalachian State on Saturday night at Sanford Stadium in Athens.  Big injury to Eason Sophomore quarterback Jacob Eason left the game with what coach Kirby Smart called at halftime “a little bit of a knee strain.” The injury occurred with 6:30 to play in the first quarter, during Georgia’s third possession. Eason was injured when he was hit out of bounds while scrambling on a second-and-15 play. He appeared to stumble after was pushed by an Appalachian State player while out of bounds.  Eason had been ineffective in his three possessions. He was 1-of-3 passing for four yards and was reverting to last season’s tendency for passes thrown too high and too hard. He also had two rushes for minus-1 yard. Eason was replaced by freshman Jake Fromm and never returned. Georgia fans reacted to Eason’s injury in a variety of ways. Off the bench comes Fromm Freshman Jake Fromm replaced Eason, and he looked poised and anything but intimidated by the hurried way in which he made his collegiate debut. Smart told an ESPN reporter at halftime, “He’s a gamer. The moment is not too big for him.”  Fromm’s first possession ended with a punt, but he led Georgia to touchdowns on their next three drives. The second of the touchdowns came on a 34-yard pass from Fromm to Javon Wims. Fromm was 8-of-11 passing for 109 yards on those drives. He finished the game 10-of-15 passing for 143 yards and the one touchdown. He had a QB passer rating of 168.7. With 7:47 to play in the game, Fromm was replaced by Brice Ramsey, who threw an interception on his first pass attempt, which set up the Mountaineers’ touchdown. (By the way, Ramsey threw two passes; both were intercepted; both led to App State scores.) Chubb and Michel play like ... Chubb and Michel As expected, Nick Chubb and Sony Michel helped carry the load for Georgia.  In the first half, Michel carried eight times for 71 yards in the first half, including a 44-yard run. Chubb gained 23 yards on six carries, including a 1-yard touchdown run.  To ease the burden from the freshman quarterback, Georgia relied heavily on Chubb and Michel when the second half began. One the two possessions in the third quarter, Chubb had nine carries (63 yards) and Michel eight (16 yards), while Fromm attempted three passes. Neither Chubb nor Michel played in the fourth quarter. Their final tally: Chubb, 15 carries for 96 yards and two touchdowns; Michel, 16 carries for 87 yards and one touchdown.