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    Stephanie Summers was five months pregnant when her husband died in a plane crash last year.  She gave birth to a baby boy a few months later and named him after his father, Taurean. >> Read more trending stories A year after the death of her husband, Summers reached out to Laura Gordillo, the photographer who took pictures of the couple for their last wedding anniversary together. According to Gordillo’s Facebook, Summers wanted to take pictures with her son in the same places she had taken photos with her late husband months before. She even planned to match the color schemes in the two shoots. From there, Gordillo created a custom image of Summers and her son with her late husband, who was edited into the photo. Gordillo said Summers loved the finished product and couldn’t stop crying. Taurean, who was a paramedic, was on a plane that was transferring a patient to a caner center in Phoenix. It crashed in Las Creces, killing everyone on board. “My heart broke to see what could have been, but at the same time, I was so happy to execute such a beautiful image for Stephanie and her son,” Gordillow wrote. Gordillo has since received numerous requests to create similar photos with families and their deceased loved ones. Sometimes as photographers we tend to get intertwined with the business aspect of our photography. That it is easy to...Posted by Laura Gordillo Photography on Monday, September 7, 2015
  • Behind the Lens, A Photographer's Story-- AJC Photojournalist Ben Gray talks about his shot of lightning over Midtown Atlanta.As storms rolled into Atlanta on Tuesday evening, I headed up the Downtown Connector (highway network system) on my way to cover a lightning-strike fire in Acworth, about 40 minutes north of Atlanta. Rain started pouring down, lightning lit the sky and traffic slowed to a crawl. I immediately realized there was no sense in trying to make my way to Acworth when I was in the middle of the storm already.  Equipment: Canon 1Dx camera, 16-35mm f2.8 lens zoomed to 35mm, 13 sec, f/7.1, ISO 125I pulled off at 17th Street and made my way to a parking deck, where I knew I would have protection from rain and lightning while also having a good view of the Midtown skyline. I jumped out, with my camera in hand and quickly adjusted the ISO and aperture settings for a long exposure while leaving the camera on the aperture priority setting. I didn’t have a tripod with me, so I balanced the camera on the wall of the parking deck, put my left hand under the lens to raise it up a little and hit the shutter button. To my amazement, the sky lit up with a tremendous bolt of lightning during the very first 13-second exposure. After sending the photo for use on this AJC story, I went back to shooting, but none of the photos even came close to that first frame. 
  •   A Berkmar High School ninth grader is in critical condition after she was struck by a car as she waited for the bus early Friday morning. Dominique O'Connor was apparently sitting on the curb along Champions Parkway in the Glen Oaks subdivision around 6:20am when a car jumped the curb and hit her. 'The bus stop is... right up the street and you can't see anything, it's so dark in the morning,' says friend and neighbor Josiah Adderly. 'I guess once he turned, he couldn't see anyone either.' Adderly tells WSB's Sandra Parrish O'Connor had actually called and asked him to meet her early at the bus stop, but he wasn't ready yet. He says it wasn't until he was on the bus that he and the other riders realized their friend had been hit. 'Everybody was crying and we was (sic) all devastated that it was her,' says Adderly. O'Conner suffered a broken pelvis and injuries to her hand and face.  She was admitted to Gwinnett Medical Center's Intensive Care Unit. Gwinnett Police have not released any information about the driver or any charges in the case.
  • A teenage boy is arrested after being caught on tape flashing women in Fayette County. Peachtree City Police have charged a 15-year-old boy with five counts of indecent exposure and one count of sexual battery, for exposing himself to a woman who was walking near Flat Creek Road earlier this week. Members of the Criminal Investigations Division used surveillance video to identify the teen. The boy is being held at the regional youth detention center pending a court hearing at the Fayette County Juvenile Court.
  • If what the Twitterverse is saying about the presidential candidates after their nominations is any indication, President Obama may face an uphill battle headed toward the election in November. Mike Gelfond at Mastermind, an Atlanta marketing firm compared social media traffic on the candidates from one week before their respective nominations to the day after. “I was floored,” he exclaimed. While the volume of social media messages was about the same for both President Barack Obama and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney, Gelfond said the number of negative messages regarding President Obama was twice those for Romney. Who is tweeting these angry messages? According to Mastermind’s analysis, 60-percent of them come from men who are 35 or older. “When you look at this and see a 35 and older crowd is making up about 60-percent of all chatter, you got to think this is not good for Obama supporters,” Gelfond said. He said it was a strong indication that Romney had a strong lead on mobilizing his support – at least, on the internet.
  • Marietta Police have arrested a man for raping a contract employee at the apartment where he is a resident. Officer David Baldwin tells WSB the woman was cleaning a vacant apartment at the Ashford Retreat Apartments on Windy Hill Road Wednesday when she was attacked. 'She was attacked by an unknown suspect who approached her with a knife and stole an unknown amount of money from her. During this encounter, he also sexually assaulted the victim and then eventually locked her into a closet in the back bedroom and fled,' said Baldwin. Baldwin says they managed to arrest Norris Leonard, who lived in the apartment across from where the attack occurred, in less than 24 hours. 'The one thing that we do know is that there is no relationship at all between the two. It was actually a stranger attack,' said Baldwin. Police believe this was an isolated incident but, if there are other victims out there they are encouraged to call Marietta Police at 770-794-6990.
  • They may look cute and harmless, but contact with reptiles and amphibians can make you sick.  More than 160 cases of human Salmonella infections linked to small turtles have been reported across 30 states.Sixty-four percent of all ill persons are children age 10 or younger, and 56 percent are Hispanic. 
  • War engulfed Europe after Germany invaded Poland in September, 1939; the United States entered the war upon the December 7, 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. One source indicates WSB broadcast nearly 20 news programs daily by 1942. With many male WSB staffers off at war, the station became one of the few to use woman on the air; announcer Jane Sparks later became a station executive. On June 6, 1944, as U.S. and Allied troops invaded German-occupied France, WSB News Director (and Atlanta Journal Managing Editor) Wright Bryan broadcast one of the single most famous news reports of the war over NBC, flying with one of the first groups of paratroopers on invasion day. The report was so memorable it was later dramatized by Orson Welles! Bryan himself was later captured by the Germans about a year before the war ended in 1945. In a genuine rarity for the era, the station employed not one but two female announcers. WSB made Georgia’s first experimental FM broadcasts before the war ended; WSB-FM began commercial operations in late 1948---just as WSB-TV also took to the air. Hear Wright Bryan’s historic news report, June 6, 1944. [1:02] Hear the story of pioneering female WSB staffer Jane Sparks. [1:00]
  • Abby has always been a child that required a lot of sleep. Since the day she was born, she was a twelve hour sleeper plus naps. I was always told that she would grow out of it. However, December 2010, at the age of 7, she started needing even more sleep. I blew it off as her going through a growing spurt, or being overtired from long days at school. In January, it continued. Everyone kept telling me I was being over protective and over worried. She started withdrawing from her activities because she was too tired after a long day of school. Gymnastics was her favorite activity and it became an argument each week. She would try to participate, but then after about 20 minutes of it, she'd come over to me and tell me she was too tired and her legs hurt. Again, in the back of my mind, I was becoming more and more worried. When her birthday rolled around in February, she planned a slumber party at our house on a Friday night. Most 8 year old girls would be ecstatic when they'd get off the bus on their birthday party day. Abby, however, came off the bus and asked if she could go upstairs into her room and read a book. Ten minutes later, she was fast asleep...on the day of her birthday party. I woke her thirty minutes before the party was starting, and she was groggy, grouchy, and really not interested in having her friends come over. This was not normal for my bubbly, friendly, social little girl. The following week, I had her 8 year old well checked scheduled. Needless to say, I insisted on a blood test. When her blood counts come back low, I was immediately worried as my mother had passed away from leukemia 15 years ago. I knew what low blood counts could mean. Our pediatrician was worried as well, so he immediately called Dr. Lew at the Aflac Cancer Center who instructed us to take the counts again in one week. The following week, we had the same results. One week after that, we were at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta for some tests. We left Children’s thinking Abby had a blood infection that would resolve itself in two weeks. However, the following day, on March 11, 2011, the test results came back positive for leukemia. That is how our journey started. During the past few months, we have obviously adjusted to the 'new normal.' Our world resolves around doctor's appointments, days at the clinic, spreadsheets of medicine dosages, and arranging activities around blood count levels. The doctors and nurses here have been amazingly kind, knowledgeable, helpful, caring, and loving. We have always been supported, loved, and cared for. All of our questions are always answered and if they do not know the answers right away, we usually have them within a day. Everything is explained to us ahead of time, so we can plan accordingly. Most importantly, though, is the love and respect they all give Abby. Abby is old enough to understand what is going on and to have questions of her own. Everyone at the Aflac Cancer Center talks to her, answers her questions, and makes sure she is as comfortable as possible. I do not wish this diagnosis or experience on anyone. In fact, if I could change our path and take it all away, I certainly would. However, if I have to go down this path, I wouldn't want to do it anywhere else other than here. I am daily grateful for all the love and respect we receive from all the staff, and I will be eternally grateful to them all.