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National

    A man was eating a bagel outside of a convenience store when he was fatally stabbed in the chest early Thursday morning. The 31-year-old victim was seated on a crate eating a toasted bagel with jelly around 6:20 a.m. when the suspect walked over to him, unfolded a knife and plunged it into the man’s chest, according to the New York Daily News. >> Read more trending news In video of the incident, the victim looks stunned, then tries to escape the suspect. The victim collapsed in front of a taxi and later died, according to WPIX. The victim was known around the neighborhood as being down on his luck, but always willing to help or do an odd job, according to WPIX. The suspect told investigators the man had just robbed him, according to the Daily News. The suspect is in custody, but no charges have been filed.
  • NOT REAL: Trump Is Furious After Discovering Gov't Waste THE FACTS: A story posted by borntobebright.com falsely claims that Trump initiated an internal audit of the Social Security Administration. While the piece correctly states that the audit found the agency spent nearly $32 million on conferences from fiscal years 2013 to 2016, the inquiry ended in January, before Trump was inaugurated. ___ NOT REAL: SEVERAL BLACK MEN FOUND DEAD IN MASS GRAVE AT DEAD KKK LEADER'S ESTATE THE FACTS: The story shared by the Jackson Telegraph and other hoax sites claims the FBI announced the discovery a mass grave of black men at the former Mississippi home of KKK leader Eldon Lee Edwards. Brett Carr, a spokesman for the FBI's Jackson, Mississippi, tells the AP the story is 'fabricated' and has 'no validity.' The announcement was attributed to an FBI spokesman named Adrian Cartwright, but Carr says the bureau has no spokesmen by that name. ___ NOT REAL: Gretchen Carlson: 'The 2nd Amendment Was Written Before Guns Were Invented' THE FACTS: The former Fox News anchor did come out in support of an assault weapons ban last year and defended her stance on Twitter. But she never claimed the Second Amendment was written before guns were invented. In fact, Carlson said on Fox News that she wanted to 'hold true the sanctity of the Second Amendment while still having common sense.' The story shared by redherald.com, therightists.com and other sites also claims Carlson doubted that Elvis Presley is dead and man landed on the Moon. ___ NOT REAL: Trey Gowdy Ends The Russia Investigation ONCE AND FOR ALL THE FACTS: Gowdy said the House Oversight Committee he leads would end its investigation into ties between President Donald Trump's campaign and Russia, but he has no power to halt others inquiries. Several other investigations by other Congressional committees and Justice Department counsel Robert Mueller are ongoing. Gowdy, a Republican from South Carolina, is a frequent target of false news sites focusing on politics. ___ NOT REAL: Urban Meyer resigns as head football coach for Ohio State THE FACTS: The Buckeyes coach hasn't stepped down despite this story from hoax site channel23news.com. The item is clearly marked as a prank and takes a shot at Ohio State's archrival, Michigan. The fake article quotes Meyer as saying that his resignation is the only way Michigan can beat the Buckeyes. Ohio State has beaten Michigan five straight times since Meyer took over at Ohio State in 2012. ___ This weekly fixture is part of The Associated Press' ongoing efforts to fact-check claims in suspected false news stories. ___ Find all AP Fact Checks here: https://www.apnews.com/tag/APFactCheck
  • The White House announced Friday that Anthony Scaramucci, a longtime supporter of President Donald Trump, has been named White House communications director. Soon after the announcement was made, White House press secretary Sean Spicer announced his resignation. Who is Scaramucci? Here’s a look at the new communications director. Scaramucci, 53, is a Wall Street financier. He has degrees from Tufts University and Harvard. He was a Trump donor and member of his transition team. Last month, he was named a senior vice president and chief strategy officer at the U.S. Export-Import Bank. He began his career at Goldman Sachs. He, along with Andrew Boszhardt, founded the investment firm Oscar Capital Management. They eventually sold the firm. He funded another investment firm, SkyBridge Capital. He hosted a show on “Wall Street Week,” and was a contributor to the Fox News Channel. Scaramucci was to be appointed director of the White House Office of Public Liaison and Intergovernmental Affairs, but the appointment was held up by a review of his finances by the Office of Government Ethics. His appointment fell through. He was the subject of a story by CNN that ended up costing the three journalists who worked on it their jobs. The story connected Scaramucci to an executive from a Kremlin-linked investment fun. The network apologized to Scaramucci. He accepted the apology. He served as a fundraiser for President Barack Obama. Scaramucci endorsed Scott Walker and then Jeb Bush in the 2016 presidential election before joining Trump’s campaign. Scaramucci will replace Mike Dubke. Dubke resigned as communications director in May. Sources: Politico; New York Times; Associated Press
  • Overage charges for cell phone data usage aren’t cheap, and many people are excited with the prospect of getting free Wi-Fi in shared spaces. >> Read more trending news But “free” Wi-Fi is almost never free. Usually, getting access requires accepting some terms and conditions from the provider. But do those agreements say anything out of the ordinary? And does anyone read them before accepting them? Purple, a British company that provides Wi-Fi services to customers around the world, sought answers to those questions. In a blog post, Purple detailed their findings:  Barely any of the people who agreed to terms and conditions set forth by the company read them -- even when they threatened to make the users clean toilets. To make their study more fun, Purple added an extra clause, saying, “The user may be required, at Purple’s discretion, to carry out 1,000 hours of community service.” That included tasks ranging from “cleansing local parks of animal waste” and “providing hugs to stray cats and dogs” to “manually relieving sewer blockages” and “scraping chewing gum off the streets.” Few people acknowledged the clause. Of 22,000 people who signed up for free Wi-Fi over a two-week period, just one -- that’s 0.000045 percent -- caught the “Community Service Clause” inserted into the agreement. The CEO of Purple, Gavin Wheeldon, admonished his user base about the findings. “Wi-Fi users need to read terms when they sign up to access a network,” he said. “What are they agreeing to, how much data are they sharing, and what license are they giving to providers? Our experiment shows it’s all too easy to tick a box and consent to something unfair.” Read more at Purple.
  • A federal judge has ordered Kentucky taxpayers to pay more than $220,000 in fees to the attorneys for two same-sex couples and others who won a legal fight against a county clerk who refused to issue them marriage licenses in 2015. U.S. District Judge David Bunning says Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis was acting on behalf of the state government when she refused to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples on the basis of her personal religious beliefs. He ordered the state to pay $222,695 in fees to the attorneys of four couples who sued Davis, along with $2,008.08 in costs. He said the county government and Davis herself are not liable. 'Davis represented the Commonwealth of Kentucky when she refused to issue marriage licenses to legally eligible couples. The buck stops there,' Bunning wrote. A U.S. Supreme Court decision effectively legalized same-sex marriage nationwide in the summer of 2015, setting off joyous celebrations among gay rights advocates nationwide. But just hours after the decision, Davis' announcement she would stop issuing marriage licenses transformed the tiny town of Morehead into the front lines of the culture war with angry demonstrations from both sides captured on national television. The case reached its zenith after a judge sent Davis to jail for refusing his order to issue the licenses. When she was freed five days later, two Republican presidential candidates were there to greet her along with thousands of supporters, including a church choir. Davis' office issued modified marriage licenses that did not include her name. In the spring of 2016, Kentucky's new Republican governor signed a law removing the names of county clerks from marriage license forms. Davis said that satisfied her concerns. William Sharp, legal director for the ACLU of Kentucky, said he was pleased with the ruling and hopes it serves as a reminder to Kentucky officials that 'willful violations of individuals' civil liberties ... will not only be challenged but will also prove costly.' 'It is unfortunate that Kentucky taxpayers will likely bear the financial burden of the unlawful actions and litigation strategies of an elected official, but those same voters are free to take that information into account at the ballot box,' Sharp said. The judge ruled that the couples were the 'prevailing party,' meaning Davis officially lost the lawsuit. Mat Staver, Davis' attorney, said he will appeal that. If he succeeds, it could mean the state would not have to pay because only 'prevailing parties' are entitled to legal fees. While Davis is a county official, she is elected by the voters. Rowan County Attorney Cecil Watkins said the county should not have to pay those fees. 'My job was to protect the county taxpayer money. I did that,' he said. Emails to representatives of Republican Gov. Matt Bevin and Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear were not immediately returned.
  • There are some things you should and shouldn’t do on a plane; one of those is rub your feet on the armrests of the person in front of you. >> Read more trending news Jessie Char, 30, shared on social media that she had a “nightmare” flight due to a pair of unwelcome feet. Char live tweeted her experience, which was horrible for her but entertainment for others. >> Tour de France cyclist shares gruesome photo of veiny legs It all started with an empty row on her JetBlue flight from Long Beach to San Francisco where she took her seat, “Today” reported. 
  • A federal judge on Friday approved an $11.2 million settlement between the marital infidelity website Ashley Madison and users who sued after hackers released personal information, including financial data and details of their sexual proclivities. U.S. District Judge John Ross in St. Louis gave preliminary approval to a class action settlement that was initially announced last week by Toronto-based Ruby Corp., the parent company of Ashley Madison. Lawsuits from around the country were consolidated in the Eastern District of Missouri. A final approval hearing is scheduled for Nov. 20. Douglas Dowd, an attorney representing users of the website, said the settlement is 'fair and reasonable' for both sides. Robert Atkins, the lead attorney for Ruby Corp., declined comment after the hearing. The lawsuits were filed after hackers outed millions of people who used the website two years ago. The suits said Ashley Madison misled consumers about its security measures and safeguards. The company denied wrongdoing but said in a statement that it settled to 'avoid the uncertainty, expense, and inconvenience associated with continued litigation.' Ashley Madison is marketed to people seeking extramarital relationships. Its slogan is, 'Life is short. Have an affair.' At one time, it purported to have about 39 million members. The case is unique in that many website users not only want to remain anonymous but registered using false names, said James McDonough III, an attorney for the users. As a result, those eligible for the settlement won't be contacted directly. Instead, they will reach out to those who could benefit via magazine and web ads. Ross agreed with that plan. 'There's just no way to give direct notice to class members,' he said. McDonough said there is no estimate on how many people will seek part of the settlement money, which could range from as little as $19 for those victimized by the hack up to $2,000 for those who were victims of identity theft because of the hack. Ashley Madison's systems were hacked in July 2015. Hackers posted the details a month later after the company didn't comply with their demands to shut down. The release of evidence of infidelity triggered extortion crimes and unconfirmed reports of suicides. In December, Ruby Corp. agreed to pay $1.6 million in settlements with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission over the data breach. Thirteen states and the District of Columbia joined the FTC in the investigation that found lax data security practices. The investigation also found Ashley Madison created fake female profiles to entice male users. In addition to monetary penalties to the FTC, Ruby agreed in December to end certain deceptive practices, to not create fake profiles, and to develop a stronger data security program. The company has said that since the initial hack it has implemented several measures to make customer data more secure.
  • A driver armed with a machete and a man walking across the street who did not seem to be paying attention while on a cellphone grabbed a trash can and started fighting Wednesday, police said.  A passerby caught the fracas on camera. The video shows the pedestrian, who is dressed in red, in a standoff with Luis Roman, 35, who is holding a machete, clanging the blade on the sidewalk. A woman in a polka dot dress is standing between the two men.  >> Read more trending news The woman and Roman get back into the car but the other man tries to open the passenger door. The video shows Roman chasing the man while swinging the machete. The blade flies off and down the sidewalk.  The two then trade blows in the street.  Roman was arrested and charged with assault, criminal mischief, menacing, and criminal possession of a weapon, according to DNAInfo.com.  He was arraigned Thursday morning.  Roman, who has worked about eight months for the MTA guarding other employees who collect fare money, said he was defending himself from the man, who is seen in the video throwing a garbage can, garbage and trying to open Roman’s car doors, according to DNAInfo.com. Roman is allowed to carry a service weapon for his job, but he did not have it when he was arrested. He was held on $2,500 bond.
  • Blac Chyna is moving on. In the weeks since her ex-fiancé Rob Kardashian shared nude and explicit photos of her, Chyna has been focused on the positive things in her life, especially her daughter, Dream. >> Read more trending news “Words are words, but once you start posting actual pictures, then that’s just not right. It’s actually against the law,” she told PEOPLE magazine. “If I was to go and do a very artsy, high-end photo shoot exposing my breasts, that’s my choice. This is my body. It’s my right. Once somebody else does it, it’s just not right. I’m hoping that somehow, some way, this will let [more people] know, ‘Don’t do it.’” >> Related: Blac Chyna seeks restraining order against Rob Kardashian  Only July 10, Chyna was granted a restraining order against her ex, and since then, she said other women have approached her with similar stories. “I just want to voice my story, voice what’s real, because at the end of the day, the person next to me could possibly be going through the same thing,” she told PEOPLE. “For people to actually look up to me really means a lot. These types of things, they happen every day. A lot of women, they don’t address it. See it, recognize it, but don’t be tainted by it. Just be strong and positive.” Despite the drama, Chyna said she wouldn’t change her past romantic relationship with Kardashian. “I’m glad I’m relieved of [Rob], but ... why did I have to get relief in this way?” she said. “I feel like God does certain things not to hurt you, but to show you your true strength. I feel like if I can come out of this, I can come out of anything.” The couple has also agreed to continue the 50/50 custody of their 8-month-old daughter, with Kardashian caring for Dream four days a week and Chyna taking the other other three. Read more at People.com.
  • U.S. immigration officials said Friday they consider a woman trying to avoid deportation by seeking sanctuary in a Connecticut church to be a fugitive, but acknowledge they have a policy that restricts them from entering a house of worship except in extraordinary circumstances. Gov. Dannel P. Malloy is among those showing support for Nury Chavarria, of Norwalk. The Democrat visited her Thursday night after she took refuge inside the Iglesia De Dios Pentecostal church in New Haven. Malloy said the attempt to deport the housekeeper and mother of four shows President Donald Trump's administration is not being truthful when it says its immigration policies are focused on 'the bad guys.' 'I am here to say this individual case is a wrong, but I am also very concerned that the greater wrong is when the American people are lied to about what their government is doing,' he told reporters after leaving the church. 'If everything I have learned so far about this particular case bears up then we are being lied to about this case and apparently other cases, as well.' Chavarria, who is from Guatemala, has lived in the U.S. for 24 years. Her four children, who range in age from 9 to 21, are U.S. citizens. Khaalid Walls, a spokesman for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement said in an email Friday that Chavarria was allowed to voluntarily depart by a federal immigration judge in 1998, but failed to comply. He said a final order of removal was issued in 1999. In 2010, the agency deferred her removal for one year on humanitarian grounds, he said. Chavarria's supporters said she has gone to ICE and received a stay every year since then, until June, when she was ordered to get on a plane to Guatemala by Thursday. 'Since she did not depart as instructed, she is currently an ICE fugitive,' said Walls. It is not clear how long Chavarria intends to remain in the church. Walls said ICE policy is to avoid conducting enforcement activities at churches 'unless they have prior approval from an appropriate supervisory official or in the event of exigent circumstances.' U.S. Sens. Richard Blumenthal and Chris Murphy, both Democrats, asked federal immigration authorities for a stay of deportation on humanitarian grounds, but their request was denied. Both said Friday they would continue to fight on her behalf. They said she has a compelling humanitarian argument because her 21-year-old son suffers from cerebral palsy. They said ICE officials should also take another look at why she was denied asylum when her father and brother's requests were granted. 'The policy from the Trump administration is inhumane,' Murphy said. Chavarria's 9-year-old daughter Haley told reporters outside the church that she is happy to get to spend more time with her mother, but also sad because she knows it is temporary. 'She is not a criminal and has a positive attitude about everything,' Haley said. 'I want her to stay. I love her so much. My message to President Trump is, 'Don't separate my family.'