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    Shanshan Feng shot a 6-under 66 on Saturday to take a one-stroke lead after three rounds of the LPGA Volvik Championship. Feng is 15 under for the tournament after a bogey-free round. Lizette Salas (67) is in second place, one shot ahead of Suzann Pettersen (69). Second-round leader Sung Hyun Park (72) is tied for fourth with Jeong Eun Lee (68) at 12 under. Feng, of China, has six career victories, the most recent at last year's TOTO Japan Classic. She's finished in the top 10 three times this season, including the past two events. Feng birdied the last two holes Saturday at Travis Pointe Country Club. She took over sole possession of the lead when Salas bogeyed No. 18 moments later.
  • The parents of a 16-year-old girl who was filmed urinating in a bathroom stall say officials at a California high school aren't doing enough to punish the perpetrator who received a three-day suspension after she admitted to posting the video on social media. The 17-year-old girl, a star athlete at San Ramon Valley High School in Danville, was arrested but allowed to return to school the next day, remain on her team and participate in a championship game, The East Bay Times reported (http://bayareane.ws/2r7SE0z ). The victim's mom, Denise Lynch, accused school district officials of failing to properly respond to the incident by allowing the girl stay in the school. She said her daughter's grades dropped and that she is suffering emotionally by having to face her tormentor at school. 'When it is reported to you, you do nothing, you minimize it, you sweep it under the rug,' Lynch told board members at a meeting Tuesday. 'Had my daughter not told us . or God forbid killed herself, everyone would be asking themselves: 'What more could have been done?' Now is the time to do something,' her husband Sean Lynch said. The Lynches found out about the video when it was posted on Instagram in April, months after it was filmed in November by a cellphone from under a bathroom stall. A San Ramon Valley Unified School District spokeswoman declined to discuss the district's response to the incident, citing student privacy. She said police reported the incident to school officials, who investigated it and took disciplinary action. In general, 'the district uses progressive discipline, meaning that the type of discipline may in part depend on a student's past behavioral history. We are also increasingly using restorative practices when possible,' Elizabeth Graswich said. The girl was arrested and cited for invasion of privacy, which is a misdemeanor, Danville police spokesman Geoff Gillette said. Her case will be reviewed by the Contra Costa County Juvenile Probation Department, he said.
  • The Latest on AP Fact Checks for the previous week (all times local): 5:45 p.m. President Donald Trump says the leader of the Philippines is doing a 'great job' combatting his country's drug problems. But an AP Fact Check finds those efforts come with harsh consequences, according Trump's own administration. Trump congratulated Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte in a phone call April 29 and praised him for 'the unbelievable job on the drug problem.' That's according to a transcript obtained by The Washington Post. Yet a State Department human rights report describes in harsh terms the thousands of killings by police and vigilantes of suspected Philippine drug dealers and users. The killings have been carried out without formal evidence or trials. That same report says Duterte released lists of suspected drug criminals. Some on those lists were killed. ___ 11 a.m. It's been a muted week for President Donald Trump when it comes to tweeting. But AP Fact Checks have spotted some tall tales in his rhetoric during his first foreign trip since taking office. For one, Trump claimed that fellow NATO members 'owe massive amounts of money' to the common defense. They don't. The actual issue is that the United States wants them to live up to their commitment to increase spending on their own military budgets by 2024.
  • Nick Ahmed singled off the glove of second baseman Eric Sogard and into center field leading off the eighth inning, the first hit for the Arizona Diamondbacks against the Milwaukee Brewers' Chase Anderson on Saturday. Sogard was shifted to the first-base side but raced to the left side of second to try for the grounder. On Aug. 16, 2015, Ahmed blooped a single to right-center leading off the eighth for the Diamondbacks' first hit against Atlanta's Shelby Miller. Sogard, a 29-year-old right-hander, set a career best with 11 strikeouts but walked three while throwing a career-high 114 pitches. Rob Scahill relieved after the hit, and Anderson received an extended standing ovation. Milwaukee leads 6-0. Anderson was drafted by Arizona in 2009 and pitched for the Diamondbacks in 2014 and 2015 before Milwaukee acquired him in a trade last year.
  • The Latest on the death of former national security adviser, Zbigniew Brzezinski (all times local): 5:45 p.m. Former presidents are remembering Jimmy Carter's national security adviser, Zbigniew Brzezinski (ZBIG'-nyef breh-ZHIN'-skee), as an 'influential voice' who 'shaped decades of American national security policy.' Barack Obama says that he was one of several presidents 'who benefited from his wisdom and counsel.' And George H.W. Bush says Brzezinski's command of foreign affairs made him an 'influential voice in key policy debates.' Brzezinski died Friday in Virginia at the age of 89. His death was announced by his daughter, MSNBC host Mika Brzezinski. The elder Brzezinski helped Carter bridge wide gaps between Egypt's Anwar Sadat and Israel's Menachem Begin. Those efforts led to the historic Camp David accords in September 1978. ___ 8 a.m. Former President Jimmy Carter is remembering his national security adviser, Zbigniew Brzezinski (ZBIG'-nyef breh-ZHIN'-skee), as 'a superb public servant' as well as 'brilliant, dedicated and loyal.' Brzezinski died Friday at the age of 89. His death was announced by his daughter, MSNBC host Mika Brzezinski. Carter says in a statement that he had been impressed by Brzezinski's background and his scholarly and political writings. The former president says Brzezinski became a natural choice for his national security adviser when he became president. In that role, Brzezinski helped Carter bridge wide gaps between Egypt's Anwar Sadat and Israel's Menachem Begin. Those efforts led to the Camp David accords in September 1978. Three months later, U.S.-China relations were normalized, a top priority for Brzezinski.
  • Gregg Allman, a survivor of tragedy, knew the blues musically and in a painfully personal way. Raised by a single mother after his father was shot to death, he idolized his guitar-slinging older brother Duane and became his musical partner. They formed the nucleus of The Allman Brothers Band, which helped define the Southern rock sound of the 1970s. Their songs such as 'Whipping Post,' ''Ramblin' Man' and 'Midnight Rider' laid the foundation for the genre and opened the doors for groups like Lynyrd Skynyrd and the Marshall Tucker Band. Gregg Allman, whose bluesy vocals and soulful touch on the Hammond B-3 organ helped propel the Allman Brothers Band to superstardom, died Saturday. He was 69. Allman died peacefully and surrounded by loved ones at his home near Savannah, Georgia, his manager, Michael Lehman, told The Associated Press. He blamed cancer for Allman's death. 'It's a result of his reoccurrence of liver cancer that had come back five years ago,' Lehman said in an interview. 'He kept it very private because he wanted to continue to play music until he couldn't.' Allman played his last concert in October as health problems forced him to cancel other 2016 shows. He announced Aug. 5 that he was 'under his doctor's care at the Mayo Clinic' due to 'serious health issues.' Later that year, he canceled more dates, citing a throat injury. In March, he canceled performances for the rest of 2017. Born in Nashville, Tennessee, the rock star known for his long blond hair was raised in Florida. In his 2012 memoir, 'My Cross to Bear,' Allman described how his older brother was a central figure in his life in the years after their father was murdered by a man he met in a bar. The two boys endured a spell in a military school before being swept up in rock music in their teens. Although Gregg was the first to pick up a guitar, it was Duane who excelled at it. So Gregg later switched to the organ. They spent years in bands together, but failed to crack success until they formed The Allman Brothers Band in 1969. It featured extended jams, tight guitar harmonies by Duane Allman and Dickey Betts, rhythms from a pair of drummers and the smoky blues inflected voice of Gregg Allman. Based in Macon, Georgia, the group also had drummers Jai Johanny 'Jaimoe' Johanson and Butch Trucks and bassist Berry Oakley. They reached the pinnacle of the burgeoning music scene, partying to excess while defining a sound that still excites millions. Their self-titled debut album came out in 1969, but it was their seminal live album 'At Fillmore East' in 1971 that catapulted the band to stardom. Considered one of the greatest live albums ever made, the two LP record opened with their version of Blind Willie McTell's 'Statesboro Blues,' with Duane Allman on slide guitar. The album introduced fans to their fusion of blues, rock and jazz. Duane Allman had quickly ascended to the pantheon of guitar heroes, not just from his contributions to the Allman band, but from his session work with Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett and with Eric Clapton on the classic 'Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs' album. But he was killed in a motorcycle accident in October 1971, just months after recording the Fillmore shows. Another motorcycle accident the following year claimed Oakley's life. Keyboard player Chuck Leavell joined the band following Duane Allman's death and the band continued to soar. Their follow-up to the Fillmore album, 'Eat a Peach,' became their first top 10 album and featured some of their most popular recordings, including 'Melissa' and 'Blue Sky.' Gregg Allman said in a 1998 interview with The Associated Press that he and Betts mourned his brother's death in music. 'We used to write songs in a graveyard in Macon,' Allman said. 'One thing everybody thought was Duane would come back to haunt us if we did not keep going. He had the most passion for music of any man I've ever seen.' In a 2012 interview with The Associated Press, he said Duane remained on his mind every day. Once in a while, he could even feel his presence. 'I can tell when he's there, man,' Allman said. 'I'm not going to get all cosmic on you. But listen, he's there.' The 1970s brought more highly publicized turmoil: Allman was compelled to testify in a drug case against a former road manager for the band and his marriage to the actress and singer Cher was short-lived even by show business standards. In 1975, Cher and Allman married three days after she divorced her husband and singing partner, Sonny Bono. Their marriage was tumultuous from the start; Cher requested a divorce just nine days after their Las Vegas wedding, although she dismissed the suit a month later. Together they released a widely panned duets album under the name 'Allman and Woman.' They had one child together, Elijah Blue, and Cher filed for legal separation in 1977. Allman said in an interview with Viva magazine in 1977 that he regretted marrying Cher and said that they probably could have fallen in love if it hadn't been for his drug abuse. The Allman Brothers Band likewise split up in the 1980s and then re-formed several times over the years. A changing cast of players has included Derek Trucks, nephew of original drummer Butch Trucks, as well as guitarist Warren Haynes. Starting in 1990, more than 20 years after its founding, the reunited band began releasing new music and found a new audience. In 1995 the band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and they won a Grammy Award for best rock instrumental performance for 'Jessica' the following year. In 2000, Betts was ousted from the band via fax for alleged substance abuse and poor performance and he hasn't played with the band since. Butch Trucks died in January 2017. Authorities said he shot himself in front of his wife at their Florida home. In his memoir, Allman said he spent years overindulging in women, drugs and alcohol before getting sober in the mid-1990s. He said that after getting sober, he felt 'brand new' at the age of 50. 'I never believed in God until this,' he said in an interview with The Associated Press in 1998. 'I asked him to bring me out of this or let me die before all the innings have been played. Now I have started taking on some spiritualism.' However, after all the years of unhealthy living he ended up with hepatitis C which severely damaged his liver. He underwent a liver transplant in 2010. After the surgery, he turned music to help him recover and released his first solo album in 14 years 'Low Country Blues' in 2011. 'I think it's because you're doing something you love,' Allman said in a 2011 interview with The Associated Press. 'I think it just creates a diversion from the pain itself. You've been swallowed up by something you love, you know, and you're just totally engulfed.' The band was honored with a lifetime achievement Grammy in 2012. ____ Hall reported from Nashville, Tennessee. Associated Press Writer Hillel Italie in New York City contributed to this story.
  • The Latest on the death of the mother of the CEO of ride-hailing company Uber (all times local): 2:30 p.m. Authorities say that the parents of ride-hailing company Uber's CEO were riding a boat on Pine Flat Lake when it hit a rock and sank. The Fresno County Sheriff's office says in a statement that about 5 p.m. Friday, officers were called to the scene of the accident and found a man and woman on a shore of the lake. The sheriff's office says the woman died at the scene, and the man suffered moderate injuries. He told officers the boat had sunk. The sheriff's office says an autopsy of the woman is planned. Uber identified the couple as Bonnie and Donald Kalanick, the parents of Uber CEO Travis Kalanick. Bonnie Kalanick was 71. The sheriff's office says crews will try to remove the boat from the lake Saturday. ___ 2:05 p.m. Bonnie Kalanick, the mother of Uber CEO Travis Kalanick, has died in a boating accident. Kalanick's father, Donald, was injured and is in serious condition. The ride-hailing company says Saturday that the accident took place Friday night in Fresno, California. The couple, in their early 70s, have been longtime boaters. In a memo to Uber staff, Liane Hornsey, the chief human resources officer, called the incident an 'unthinkable tragedy.' She wrote that 'everyone in the Uber family knows how incredibly close Travis is to his parents.' Travis Kalanick, 40, founded Uber in 2009.
  • The mother of the CEO of the ride-hailing company Uber died in a boat accident Friday evening in Fresno County, the company said. Bonnie Kalanick, 71, died after the boat she and her husband, Donald, 78, were riding hit a rock in Pine Flat Lake in the eastern part of the county, authorities said. They are the parents of Travis Kalanick, 40, who founded Uber in 2009. The company has since grown to become an international operation with a market value of nearly $70 billion. The couple have been longtime boaters. In a memo to Uber staff, Liane Hornsey, the chief human resources officer, called the incident an 'unthinkable tragedy.' She wrote that 'everyone in the Uber family knows how incredibly close Travis is to his parents.' About 5 p.m. Friday, officers were called to the scene of the accident and found a man and woman on a shore of the lake, the Fresno County Sheriff's office said in a statement. The woman died at the scene, and the man suffered moderate injuries, the sheriff's office said. He told officers the boat had sunk. An autopsy of the woman is planned, the office said. Uber identified the couple as the Kalanicks. Donald Kalanick is being treated at a hospital and is in stable condition, the company said. Crews will try to remove the boat from the lake Saturday, the sheriff's office said.
  • Sebastien Bourdais was in one of the best race cars he'd ever had, so fast that most of his competitors thought he would win the pole for the Indianapolis 500. Instead, he crashed during qualifying at Indianapolis Motor Speedway last weekend, hitting the wall at 227 mph and with 118 Gs of force. He fractured his pelvis, a hip and two ribs when his car exploded into pieces and spun through Turn 2 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. On Saturday, Bourdais vowed to be back in a car this season. 'I will be back at Sonoma,' he said of the Sept. 17 season finale, 'because I want to.' Bourdais allowed The Associated Press to attend one of his physical therapy sessions at the Rehabilitation Hospital of Indiana, where he checked himself in after two surgeries earlier this week. The 38-year-old Frenchman is already spending 3 1/2 hours a day in therapy, performing weighted leg lifts and adduction pressure drills with a rubber ball, building his strength. He used a wheelchair to get from his room to the facility gym only because the trip takes too long on crutches. Like a typical race car driver, Bourdais complained his chair is too slow and pulls to the right — 'I need a better setup,' he quipped — and he is determined not to use it Sunday, when he returns to the scene of his crash to attend the Indianapolis 500. 'I am not showing up at the race track in a wheelchair,' he said. Watching as a spectator and seeing James Davison in his car will be difficult. Bourdais was having a banner year. He was part of the winning sports car team at the Rolex 24 at Daytona, he captured the IndyCar opener at St. Petersburg and was driving a car he felt was capable of winning the 500. Next month, he was planning to return to his hometown in France to defend his class title at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. A four-time series champion who ranks sixth on IndyCar's career win list — second among active drivers behind Scott Dixon — Bourdais had never before been seriously injured in a race car. Three small wiggles on a flyer lap at Indianapolis last Saturday changed that. 'I'll tell you, it makes you feel very small, your clothes cut off and lying naked on a board,' Bourdais said. 'But I can only blame myself. Those things happen.' Bourdais moved to tiny Dale Coyne Racing this year, convinced he could help the team become a contender. He got Coyne to hire his old engineers, Craig Hampson and Olivier Boisson, who had been so instrumental in his success. Hampson was part of 31 race victories and four consecutive Champ Car World Series championships, while Boisson won four races with Bourdais over the last three years. The reunion has been wonderful for Bourdais, and he felt badly that Hampson blamed himself and the setup on the car for his accident. Bourdais instead shoulders the blame, and said many of his injuries would have been prevented if the tub of his car had not collapsed. 'I've never had a car like that. I could do anything I wanted,' he said. 'I remember everything from the little wiggle in Turn 1, to the bigger wiggle in Turn 2, to the terminal wiggle, to hitting the wall with the pedal to the metal.' He was briefly unconscious and, when he came to, told the safety crew his pelvis was broken. It was a matter of hours before he was undergoing surgery at Methodist Hospital. Bourdais was discharged Wednesday but was not comfortable returning to his hotel room, where his wife would be responsible for him so soon after surgery. So he checked into the rehab facility a short drive from the speedway and began the long, painful process of getting back in the race car. He plans to be there until next week, when the staples are removed from the foot-long incision down his right side. He'll fly home to St. Petersburg, Florida, and continue his therapy there. For now, he's surrounded by the well-wishes of so many closest to him. The second bed in what he calls his 'VIP suite' overlooking the interstate is covered in baked goods, gifts and a stack of cute, colorful cards made by daughter Emma's fourth-grade class. Tacked to the nurse's board next to his bed is a photo of his two children hugging him after a victory, and a bouquet of red and white flowers with checkered flags in the vase stands on a table nearby. Bourdais keenly understands the dangers of racing after the deaths of IndyCar drivers Dan Wheldon at Las Vegas in 2011 and Justin Wilson at Pocono two years ago. Accidents far less severe than his own have proven fatal at Indy. But he also is practical about his profession, and Bourdais said his wife Claire would never discourage him from getting back behind the wheel. 'She would never ask me,' he said. 'This is not my entire life, but it is my passion and what I love to do. And that would be a very big ask that she would never make.' ___ More AP auto racing: www.racing.ap.org
  • The Cleveland Indians and Frank Robinson made history four decades ago. They celebrated again on Saturday. The Indians unveiled a statue of Robinson prior to their game against Kansas City. Robinson became the first African-American manager in the major leagues with the team. 'It's such a great day here,' he said in a speech during the ceremony. 'I didn't think I would see this day. I never thought I would be here to see something like this.' The Indians hired Robinson following the 1974 season and he made his debut on April 8, 1975. Still active as a player, he made the day even more memorable by hitting a home run in his first at-bat. The statue shows Robinson holding the lineup card with the Indians' batting order from that game against the New York Yankees. He was the designated hitter and batted second. Robinson joined the Indians as a player late in the 1974 season and recalled the day he agreed to take job as player/manager on Oct. 3. 'I had a decision to make and I made it, for the better,' he said. 'I'm glad I did.' Robinson believes there's still room for progress for African-Americans in the game. 'It can get better,' he said. 'We're still not where we should be in the front office, in the dugouts and even now, the players' roster. We're losing ground all the way around. We're not asking to be given anything. I wouldn't want anyone of color to be given something. I want the people that want to be in this game to earn what they get.' Robinson's statue will stand in Heritage Park, located beyond the center-field stands at Progressive Field. It will be alongside statues of Bob Feller, Jim Thome and Larry Doby. Doby became the first African-American player in the American League in 1947. Robinson was also introduced on the field before the game and was presented with a framed plaque containing his Indians jersey and No. 20, which has been retired by the club. Robinson compiled a 186-189 record in his three seasons managing the Indians. He also managed the San Francisco Giants, Baltimore Orioles, Montreal Expos and Washington Nationals. Robinson had 2,943 hits and 586 home runs in his Hall of Fame career. He also played for the Cincinnati Reds, Baltimore Orioles and the Los Angeles Dodgers and Angels. Robinson played in the majors for 21 years and was inducted into Cooperstown in 1982. Hank Aaron, baseball's home run king from 1974 to 2007, attended the ceremony. Sharon Robinson, the daughter of Jackie Robinson, was also in attendance. Robinson became the majors' first African-American player in 1947. 'This is not anybody else's day but Frank's,' Aaron said. 'Frank and I have so much in common. We went into the Hall of Fame together. To me that was a given.' Robinson broke into the majors with the Reds in 1956, two years after Aaron made his debut. 'He doesn't realize how long I had to chase him, looking up at him doing something great,' Robinson said. 'It started in the minor leagues. I started trying to do what Hank Aaron did. Didn't work. He made me a better ballplayer.' Cleveland manager Terry Francona and the entire Indians team attended the ceremony. Several players spoke with Robinson following his speech.