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    When two teenagers slaughtered 12 students and a teacher at Columbine High School in Colorado 19 years ago, young people across the country learned the news the old-fashioned way: largely on television and in newspapers. It took days, if not weeks, to process the information and discover the full, horrific story. When a gunman killed 17 people at a Florida high school last week, youngsters around the globe watched the terrifying images and accounts unfold almost in real time. By the end of the day on Feb. 14, children with social media knew the name of the suspect, learned which classrooms the students were in and, in some cases, saw videos of the dead. 'My school is being shot up and I am locked inside. I'm f------ scared right now,' wrote one teen on Twitter. The tragedy at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High appears to be the first major school shooting of the social media age in which students shared the shocking images in near-real time with young people elsewhere. Experts say the images have the potential to scar kids watching from afar, potentially triggering post-traumatic stress and perhaps numbing them to the violence and causing them to fall into apathy. But the scenes might also galvanize a generation and lead young people to press for change on the political level. Amy Kohli, a junior at South Broward High School who watched the videos posted from inside Stoneman Douglas, said she believes they helped bring urgency and perspective. 'It becomes so personal because, you think 'It could've been me,'' the 16-year-old said, standing amid other gun safety demonstrators in front of the federal courthouse in Fort Lauderdale. She added: 'It can allow people to see. If they see the blood, they see the real story. What actually happened in reality. Maybe, maybe it'll help.' Already, young people are demanding action. On Tuesday, 100 Stoneman Douglas students headed for Florida's capital to urge lawmakers to prevent a repeat of the massacre. Also Tuesday, dozens of students at a high school in Boca Raton walked out of class. On Monday, teens protested at the White House and in Los Angeles, and a student march on Washington to press for tighter gun control is planned for next month. Seventeen-year-old Nicole Burmeister, who attends a high school a 20-minute drive from Stoneman Douglas, said students in a group chat she is on started posting the videos as the news was unfolding. She struggled with whether watching the footage was the right thing to do. 'They showed the gunshots one right after the other, and then the kids screaming and everything. That one I could sort of watch, but then the next one they showed a body, someone's body on the ground in a puddle of blood,' she said. 'It felt wrong to watch that.' Still, she said: 'I understand people kind of have to take videos like this to shock people. Like really show them how gruesome and how disgusting — the evil that went on this way.' Carina Viera, a senior at Stoneman Douglas, wasn't in one of the attacked classrooms but saw a graphic video posted by another student. She and her friends scrutinized it, wondering if one of the victims was a friend. The person wasn't. She wondered whether seeing the horror on a phone screen was a good thing overall. 'There's also the danger of letting people get too used to it,' she said. 'People also sharing on Snapchat with those captions like with emojis. It makes it seem like, not a joke, but makes it seem a lot less serious than it actually is.' Elisabeth Middleton, an adolescent psychologist in Austin, Texas, who is on the board of the Texas Psychological Association, said there are obvious psychological downsides to exposing youngsters to this. 'It is too much too soon for these kinds of kids. At this age, they're not prepared to deal with these kinds of events,' she said. 'On the other hand, it gives them something to bond around. It's great that they're speaking out and trying to hold the political candidates accountable.' Middleton saw a teenage patient in the days after the shooting, and they talked about her feelings after seeing the story on social media and the news. 'She feels like it could happen and you just have to kind of accept that. And I don't think that's something that kids have thought until recently. That it could happen to them. There's kind of a numbness to it,' Middleton said, adding that social media can exacerbate that feeling for a lot of kids. ___ Associated Press writer Jennifer Kay contributed to this report from Miami.
  • Louisville must vacate its 2013 men's basketball title following an NCAA appeals panel's decision to uphold sanctions against the men's program in the sex scandal case. The Cardinals will have to vacate 123 victories including the championship, and return some $600,000 in conference revenue from the 2012-15 NCAA Tournaments. The decision announced on Tuesday by the governing body's Infraction Appeals Committee ruled that the NCAA has the authority to take away championships for what it considers major rule violations. It also refuted Louisville's position that the NCAA exceeded its boundaries and didn't follow its own precedent established in other cases and said in an eight-page decision that ended, 'the penalties are upheld.' 'I cannot say this strongly enough: We believe the NCAA is simply wrong,' Louisville interim President Dr. Greg Postel said in a statement. 'We disagree with the NCAA ruling for reasons we clearly stated in our appeal. And we made a strong case - based on NCAA precedent - that supported our argument.' Louisville now must forfeit its third NCAA title, victories and income from 2012-15, part of the timeframe during which the violations occurred. The decision culminates the governing body's investigation that followed allegations in a 2015 book by escort Katina Powell that former Cardinals basketball staffer Andre McGee hired her and other dancers to strip and have sex with recruits. 'From Day One, the university has admitted that the actions of the former operations director and any others involved under previous leadership were offensive and inexcusable,' Postel said in the statement. 'That is why we apologized immediately, cooperated fully with the NCAA, self-imposed penalties that were appropriate to the offenses and made significant changes to ensure incidents like this never happen again. 'Under the NCAA's own rules, this cooperation should have been a factor in the severity of the punishment. Instead, it was ignored.' The school's own investigation into the allegation revealed that violations occurred and resulted in a self-imposed postseason ban nearly two years ago. Louisville later imposed scholarship and recruiting restrictions in an effort to mitigate further NCAA discipline. While the NCAA accepted Louisville's actions, it went further with harsher sanctions last June that included: — A five-game suspension of former Cardinals coach Rick Pitino, who was fired in October following Louisville's acknowledgement that it was being investigated in a federal bribery probe of college basketball. That measure included a show-cause penalty for Pitino, whom the NCAA criticized for failing to monitor McGee and ignoring multiple red flags; — Four years' probation, along with the vacation of those wins and appearances in the 2012 and 2013 Final Fours; — Show-cause penalties for McGee, who is no longer coaching; — Postel estimated the return of up to $600,000 in NCAA Tournament revenue. 'This dark cloud has hung over our heads for more than two years, and it has had a negative impact on our athletics program, our fans and the entire university family,' Postel said. 'While we disagree with the NCAA's decision, it is time for the university to close this chapter and move forward with a stronger commitment to excellence on and off the court.' Postel, then-athletic director Tom Jurich and Pitino said last summer they planned to fight the sanctions. Pitino, who repeatedly denied knowing about the activities described in Powell's book, was particularly frustrated with his penalties. A lot changed at Louisville in the months following the NCAA penalties. Pitino was placed on unpaid administrative leave and Jurich on paid administrative leave on Sept. 27 following the school's involvement in the FBI probe that initially involved the arrests of 10 people. ___ More AP college basketball: http://collegebasketball.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_Top25
  • Thousands of people in Zimbabwe gathered on Tuesday for the burial of opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai, whose death from cancer exacerbated divisions within a movement preparing for elections just months away. A hearse carrying Tsvangirai's body in a white casket drove slowly through the crowds to a school ground near his rural home in eastern Zimbabwe. Rival leaders have vied for control of the opposition MDC-T party after the death last week of Tsvangirai, a longtime opponent of former President Robert Mugabe who once entered into a flawed power-sharing arrangement with him after disputed elections. 'Our leaders are going to unite,' Nelson Chamisa, the new head of the opposition party, said at the burial. He said he had a condolence letter from Mugabe but refused the crowd's calls that he read it and instead handed it to a member of Tsvangirai's family. Chamisa's authority has been challenged by two other MDC officials, Thokozani Khupe and former Harare mayor Elias Mudzuri. The MDC-T party holds the second-largest number of seats in Zimbabwe's parliament. Mugabe resigned after a military takeover in November, and his successor, President Emmerson Mnangagwa, says elections will be held as scheduled this year.
  • The struggling Hornets have shaken up their front office, firing general manager Rich Cho on Tuesday. 'Rich worked tirelessly on behalf of our team and instituted a number of management tools that have benefited our organization,' Hornets owner Michael Jordan said in a release. 'We are deeply committed to our fans and to the city of Charlotte to provide a consistent winner on the court. The search will now begin for our next head of basketball operations who will help us achieve that goal.' Charlotte is 24-33 and on the verge of failing to reach the playoffs for the second straight season. Jordan's college teammate Buzz Peterson was hired last year as the team's assistant general manager is a potential replacement. Former Lakers GM Mitch Kupchak could be another candidate to join Peterson in the front office in some capacity. Cho was hired as GM in 2011 and assumed day-to-day responsibilities of the basketball operations department in 2014. 'I will always be grateful for my experience with the franchise,' Cho said. Cho and the Hornets have struggled with building a consistent winner. He was responsible for drafting All-Star point guard Kemba Walker in 2011, but the team's inability to get the No. 1 pick in the 2012 draft after a 7-59 season proved to be a backbreaker. Instead of getting perennial All-Star center Anthony Davis, the Hornets settled for Michael Kidd-Gilchrist with the No. 2 pick, a significant dropoff in talent. Charlotte missed on second-round pick Jeffery Taylor from Sweden in 2012. They took Cody Zeller, now a backup center, fourth overall in 2013, Noah Vonleh ninth in 2014 and Frank Kaminsky ninth overall in 2015. Cho drafted Malik Monk in the first round last year, but he barely sees any action for Charlotte because of concerns about his defense. Cho traded this past offseason for center Dwight Howard, who has improved his play and had a decent season for the Hornets. However, the five-year contract given to Nic Batum last year has left the Hornets strapped under the salary cap. ___ More AP basketball: www.apnews.com/tags/NBAbasketball
  • Authorities are being allowed to shut down a large homeless encampment in Southern California and move hundreds of tent-dwellers into motel rooms under an agreement Tuesday between county officials and lawyers who sued to protect tent-dwellers' rights. U.S. District Court Judge David O. Carter lifted a stay Tuesday morning that had blocked the county from making arrests in the riverbed, setting up an impromptu 'courtroom' with a table and chairs in the parking lot of the Honda Center arena, home of the Anaheim Ducks hockey team. People will be moved off a two-mile (3.2 kilometer) long stretch of a riverbed trail in Orange County to motels and other shelter as part of the deal, which is being watched by advocates elsewhere who are seeking solutions for homelessness. The deal came after advocates sued to protect the rights of evicted tent-dwellers, saying they were driven there by a police crackdown on loitering in surrounding cities. The county must conduct clinical assessments of participants and provide food and storage for their belongings. Participants must agree to speak weekly with a case worker and abide by motel rules. The encampment grew over the last several years on the trail near the baseball stadium for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim amid soaring housing costs. Many said they were pushed there after being cited by police for sleeping in parks or on sidewalks. Last week, the judge, known for his unconventional style, led lawyers on a four-hour walk through the trash-strewn encampment. How the tent-dwellers became homeless varies. Some said they couldn't earn enough at their jobs to make rent. Some said they struggled with drug addiction. The case in the county of 3.2 million people between Los Angeles and San Diego is being watched as a potential model for how officials and advocates can address homelessness elsewhere, experts said. Susan Price, the county's director of care coordination, said she believes about 140 homeless people still need housing, and the county has moved more than 200 people to motels since last week. County officials said they are concerned they may not have enough rooms to immediately move everyone off the encampment. 'We see no need to push this process faster than it needs to go,' Leon Page, an attorney for the county, told the judge during the parking lot hearing. 'Not every person is best served by going into a motel room.' Carter, however, said he was concerned that moving too slowly might draw new people into the riverbed as they county is seeking to close the encampment. 'I am most concerned about people coming back into the areas you've cleared,' Carter said. The judge also had a gray shed brought to the parking lot, and asked whether it might be an option to temporarily house some homeless until a longer lasting alternative could be worked out. The shed was the size of one typically used in suburban yards for extra storage. 'People have had plenty of notice,' he said.
  • A Clinton-Obama sex tape using body doubles. A Facebook page promoting Texas independence riddled with grammatical mistakes. Islamic State anthems blasting out during the nightshift. The U.S. indictment centered on a Russian troll farm only scratches the surface of the St. Petersburg agency that allegedly produced online content to sway the 2016 presidential election — and glosses over how unconvincing some of its stunts could be. Many of the more eye-popping accounts of the Internet Research Agency's activities have come from former staff members. One, Alan Baskaev, told the independent Russian television channel Rain last year that the agency made a video that looked like a U.S. soldier shooting a Quran and had even hired two actors in an abortive bid to fake a sex tape of Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. 'No one would buy it, clearly,' Baskaev told the broadcaster , laughing. The Associated Press couldn't confirm Baskaev's sex tape story, but a video of a purported U.S. soldier in desert camouflage firing an assault-style weapon at a Quran was posted to an American gun forum in September 2015. The fakery was screamingly obvious: The soldier's uniform was misshapen and out of date. His helmet resembled the headwear a cyclist might wear and the English he spoke was so heavily accented it was almost indecipherable. The BBC's Russian service identified the man in 2016 as a bartender in St. Petersburg, a friend of someone who worked at the troll factory. The Quran video and others like it were ignominious flops. The New York Times Magazine in 2015 identified other fake videos , including footage meant to spark panic about a chemical plant explosion in Louisiana supposedly caused by the Islamic State group. Another showed a phony shooting in Atlanta, Georgia that carried echoes of Michael Brown's fatal 2014 encounter with police in Ferguson, Missouri. The indictment that charged 13 Russians with meddling in the presidential race makes no mention of them, but the amateurish videos continued through the election. Last year The Daily Beast said it had identified 'Williams and Kalvin' — a rap duo purportedly from Atlanta that appeared in YouTube videos — as operatives of the Russian troll operation. Speaking in a thick Nigerian accent, the man who went by Williams slammed Hillary Clinton as a racist and said, 'This is time for change.' 'Let our vote go for Trump, because this man is a businessman, he's not a politician,' he continued. 'Any businessman cannot be a racist.' The cringe-inducing quality of such videos and other pieces of the trolls' work is another aspect of the alleged interference left out of the indictment — and much of the attendant media coverage. The agency did manage to organize rallies in the U.S., but turnout appears to have been microscopic. Even online, the trolls struggled with their command of English. One of the Internet Research Agency's most popular Facebook pages, the secessionist-minded Heart of Texas, was packed with malapropisms. 'Hillary Clinton behind bars is a dream of thousands of Americans and may the god this dream come true,' reads one of the Facebook posts that journalist Casey Michael eventually collected . 'Texas is a heaven of Earth, a land give to us by Lord himself!' reads another. The nonsensical quality of the work would be no surprise to former troll farm employee Baskaev. He described a slap-dash operation whose internet connections frequently failed and whose fake profiles repeatedly got spiked by Facebook administrators. When the managers had gone home, the 20-somethings working the night shift at the troll farm ran amok, he said, playing Islamic State anthems over the sound system and jokingly saluting each other with the Ukrainian nationalist greeting, 'Glory to Ukraine!' The indictment alleges that the troll farm sent operatives to the United States. Baskaev said the same to Rain last year, but added that he doubted any of them accomplished much in the U.S. 'They probably just went out boozing and partying,' he said.
  • Maldives' parliament on Tuesday approved a 30-day extension of a state of emergency declared by the president to strengthen his power, ignoring a plea from regional power India not to extend it. The extension of the emergency, first declared earlier this month after the Supreme Court ordered the release of his imprisoned political opponents, is the latest development in a political crisis that has engulfed the Indian Ocean archipelago nation for weeks. The regulations give wide powers to security forces to detain people and curtail freedom to protest. The speaker of parliament, Abdulla Maseeh, announced that the motion passed after 38 ruling party lawmakers in the 85-member house voted in favor and opposition lawmakers boycotted the balloting. The opposition said later that the emergency extension was illegal because there was no constitutionally required quorum in Parliament. According to the constitution, one fourth of the members are required for an ordinary vote to be taken and at least half the number of the members should be present in affairs 'requiring compliance by the citizens.' The constitution does not specify such instances. The two-week state of emergency declared by President Yameen Abdul Gayoom was to expire Tuesday evening, and he had asked the legislature to extend it by 30 days. The Maldives has been in political turmoil since Feb.1 when the Supreme Court ordered the release of a group of Yameen's political opponents who had been imprisoned after convictions criticized for alleged due process violations. Regional power India said in a statement earlier Tuesday that it expects that 'the government of Maldives will not be seeking extension of the state of emergency so that the political process in Maldives can resume with immediate effect.' 'After the revocation of the emergency, democratic institutions including the judiciary should be allowed to function independently and in a fair and transparent manner in accordance with the constitution,' the statement said also calling for the release of Yameen's rivals. 'It is important that Maldives quickly returns to the path of democracy and the rule of law so that the aspirations of Maldivian people are met and the concerns of the international community are assuaged.' The constitution requires that a state of emergency be approved within 48 hours of its declaration by the president. It can take up to two weeks if parliament is in recess, as was the case with Yameen's proclamation. Under the emergency law, Yameen had two Supreme Court judges arrested, accusing them of corruption. Later, the remaining three judges annulled the order to release Yameen's opponents. Yameen's half brother and former dictator Maumoon Abdul Gayoom was also arrested after the emergency decree, accused of conspiring with the opposition to overthrow the government. The judges on Sunday also delayed an earlier order to reinstate 12 pro-opposition lawmakers who were expelled after siding with the opposition. Yameen's party would have lost a majority in parliament had they been allowed to participate. 'This state of emergency is illegal and void. All acts undertaken with emergency powers are illegal,' opposition lawmaker Ibrahim Mohamed Solih told reporters. 'By entirely circumventing the constitution, President Yameen has in effect hijacked the entire state and is ruling the Maldives like a military dictator,' he said.. Maldives became a multiparty democracy in 2008 after decades of Gayoom's autocratic rule. But Yameen has rolled back much of the country's democratic gains after being elected in 2013. The country's traditional political alliances have been upended in recent years. Gayoom, now an opposition leader, is allied with exiled former President Mohamed Nasheed, who unseated him in the 2008 elections. Nasheed, Yameen's most prominent rival, is among the politicians ordered freed by the Supreme Court. Maldives is an archipelago of more than 1,000 islands. More than one-third of its 400,000 citizens live in Male, the crowded capital city. Tourism dominates the economy, with wealthy foreigners flown directly to hyper-expensive resort islands. ______________ Associated Press writer Bharatha Mallawarachi contributed to this report from Colombo, Sri Lanka.
  • Queen Elizabeth II has always dressed with style and flair — but Tuesday marked her first visit to the showy catwalks of London Fashion Week. The monarch squeezed in the front row, chatting with American Vogue editor Anna Wintour — who wore her trademark sunglasses — and presented an award recognizing British design excellence. It was an unusual outing for the 91-year-old monarch, who seemed totally at ease at the type of event usually frequented by stars like Kate Moss and Sienna Miller. She was elegant in a Angela Kelly duck egg blue tweed dress and jacket detailed with tiny aquamarine Swarovski crystals set off by formal black gloves. Elizabeth carried a matching handbag — of course — and wore her mostly white hair swept back. The queen didn't bother with the statement stiletto heels favored by many of the younger fashionistas, opting for sensible dark low-heeled court shoes for the awards presentation. 'As a tribute to the industry, and as my legacy to all those who have contributed to British fashion, I would like to present this award for new, young talent,' she said. The royal family has often hosted Fashion Week receptions for top designers and journalists, but the new award — and the queen's personal visit — have added a new dimension to its support for the industry. The lucky recipient was Richard Quinn, a recent fashion graduate of Central Saint Martins who started his own label in 2016 and has quickly earned recognition as part of the next wave of talented young British designers. The London-based Quinn received the first Queen Elizabeth II Award for British Design. The British Fashion Council chose him for the prize. His provocative show included a model wearing what looked to be a decorated green motorcycle helmet with a dark visor along with black and white polka dot leggings and a gauzy top with different size dots. The queen, who has maintained an active schedule even as her 96-year-old husband Prince Philip has stepped back from public life, took to the catwalk to address the crowd and praise Britain's fashion heritage. 'From the tweed of the Hebrides to Nottingham lace, and of course Carnaby Street, our fashion industry has been renowned for outstanding craftsmanship for many years, and continues to produce world-class textiles and cutting edge, practical designs,' she said. She also toured showrooms before presenting the award on the final day of fashion week, which brought hundreds of designers, buyers and journalists to London for a series of catwalk displays highlighted by Christopher Bailey's farewell show at Burberry. The queen's visit followed a Buckingham Palace fashion reception hosted Monday night by Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge — who is expecting her third child in April — and Sophie, the Countess of Wessex. The gala was attended by Wintour, model Naomi Campbell, designer Stella McCartney and other luminaries of the fashion scene.
  • Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko has signed a bill aimed at reintegrating the territory in the country's east controlled by Russia-backed separatists. The bill passed last month designates the areas in the Donetsk and Luhansk regions as 'temporarily occupied' by 'aggressor country' Russia. It envisages the use of military force to get them back under Ukraine's control. The conflict in the east erupted after Russia's annexation of Crimea and has killed more than 10,000 since April 2014. A 2015 peace agreement signed in Minsk has helped reduce hostilities, but clashes continue. The bill signed Tuesday contains no reference to the Minsk deal brokered by France and Germany that obliged Ukraine to pass legislation offering broad autonomy to the separatist regions and amnesty to rebels. Most Ukrainian political forces reject that.
  • The oldest captive polar bear in the U.S. has died. The Philadelphia Zoo on Tuesday said that the 37-year-old bear, Coldilocks, was in declining health and was euthanized. Zoo officials said Coldilocks had a variety of age-related medical issues, including problems with her kidneys and eyesight, but that visitors wouldn't have been able to tell as the bear pounced playfully on toys, pulling them deep into her pool during early morning dips. 'She was really a great animal,' said Dr. Keith Hinshaw, director of animal health at the zoo. It was 'spectacular' for Coldilocks to far surpass the average 23-year lifespan of a polar bear, he said. The bear took 'a sudden change for the worse' about a week ago when her appetite waned and her activity level decreased, Hinshaw said. Medical tests performed before Coldilocks was euthanized turned up potential liver and spinal problems as well, he said. Dr. Andy Baker, the zoo's chief operating officer, said Coldilocks brought attention to how climate change affects polar bears. She will be greatly missed, he said Coldilocks was born Dec. 13, 1980 at Seneca Park Zoo in New York and arrived at the Philadelphia Zoo about a year later. Her final birthday last year was celebrated with a party at the zoo. She was served a cake of peanut butter, honey, raisins and fish.