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    That's according to The Wall Street Journal, which cited a report from security firm FireEye sent to some Equifax customers including financial firms this week. The breach on March 10 came two days after security researchers at Cisco Systems warned of a flaw in an open-source software package called Apache Struts. The report says hackers entered the command 'Whoami,' which would have allowed them to determine a username for a computer it had gained access to. Equifax did not immediately respond to requests for comment on the report. A spokeswoman for FireEye, a subsidiary of security firm Mandiant, declined to comment.
  • Iran's President Hassan Rouhani said Wednesday the Iranian people are waiting for an apology from U.S. President Donald Trump for his 'extremely offensive' rhetoric and 'unfounded' allegations about his country. Rouhani told a news conference that the Trump administration is seeking 'an excuse' to pull out of the nuclear agreement that caps Iran's nuclear activities which is supported by his government and the five other parties — Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany. If the U.S. decides to break the agreement, Rouhani said, 'any choice and any option' are open for Iran 'that we see as beneficial to our country' — but he dismissed Trump's 'baseless accusation' that the nuclear deal may be providing cover for Iran's eventual construction of nuclear weapons. 'The option that we say we have at our disposal ... will never be going towards nuclear weapons,' Rouhani said. 'Iran has never sought nuclear weapons, will never seek nuclear weapons, is not now seeking nuclear weapons.' 'An option may be to start enrichment,' he said, 'not building an atom bomb.' Rouhani said Iran's 10-year agreement to purchase fuel for its nuclear reactor at Bushehr is coming to an end and it may want to produce its own enriched uranium for fuel, but 'never, ever, at all nuclear weapons.' Trump was sharply critical of Iran, urging world leaders at the U.N. General Assembly on Tuesday to join the U.S. 'in demanding that Iran's government end its pursuit of death and destruction.' He called the country 'a corrupt dictatorship' and 'murderous regime' whose oil profits 'fund Hezbollah and other terrorists that kill innocent Muslims and attack their peaceful Arab and Israeli neighbors.' And he said the nuclear deal, known as the JCPOA, was 'an embarrassment to the United States' and strongly hinted the U.S. would pull out. Rouhani responded to a question on whether his government would be willing to talk to the Trump administration about issues other than the nuclear deal saying, 'we wouldn't be able or willing to talk to them about other issues.' 'I do believe that if the United States of America breaks the commitment under the JCPOA no other government in the future will be ready and willing to talk or negotiate with the United States of America,' he added. That's because 'a government that chooses to trample upon her legal and legitimate international commitments — a conversation or negotiation with such a government would be a waste of time.' Rouhani added that Trump on Tuesday 'was extremely offensive to the people of Iran and before anything, we are waiting for Mr. Trump to issue an apology to the people of Iran.' The Iranian leader told reporters that 'if the United States government exits the agreement, undoubtedly it will be condemned by the American people themselves, and before that by the European Union and all countries throughout the world.' And if the Trump administration believes its pullout 'will bring pressure on Iran, then you can say they are completely and absolutely mistaken,' he said. 'The exiting of the United States of America from the JCPOA will not benefit them in the slightest,' Rouhani said. 'The position of Iran throughout the world will be stronger and better than before, and the government of the United States, under the pressure of public sentiments from throughout the world, will not see any benefit.' Rouhani also repeated several times that 'there will be absolutely no changes — no alterations' to the agreement. And he said Iran will not accept any 'preconditions or conditions' to keep the United States in the deal which was reached in 2015 after two years of negotiations. It was later ratified by the UN Security Council. Asked whether the agreement could survive without the U.S., he said 'it's a bit early or premature to hold discussions about such questions,' adding that the 'Europeans want to preserve it.' 'If it cannot be preserved what will happen then is a very important question that we are analyzing as well as (is) the European Union,' Rouhani said, and 'other partners' are also analyzing and discussing scenarios. 'One important aspect will be the type of reaction of the European Union should this come to pass,' he said. As for accusations that Iran is supporting terrorists, Rouhani responded with a question asking which governments created al-Qaida, formed the Taliban, supported the Islamic State extremist group and bought the oil and antiquities they are selling. 'So whomever brings their armies to our region, whomever sparks war in our region, whomever has formed and supported terrorist groups in our region is in no position to levy such accusations against the Islamic Republic of Iran,' Rouhani said.
  • Bernie Casey, a professional football player turned poet, painter and actor known for parts in films such as 'Revenge of the Nerds' and 'I'm Gonna Git You Sucka,' has died. He was 78. Casey died Tuesday in Los Angeles after a brief illness, his talent agent Erin Connor said. Born in West Virginia in 1939 and raised in Columbus, Ohio, Casey excelled in track and field and football and attended Bowling Green State University on an athletic scholarship. He went on to play wide receiver for the San Francisco 49ers and Los Angeles Rams before going back to his alma mater to get a master's degree in fine arts. For Casey, the arts always came first. He painted and published books of poetry, but the football association that he viewed as a stepping stone followed him. 'It was just a gig,' he told the Washington Post in 1977 about football. 'But it limits the way people perceive you. That can be frustrating. People have tremendous combinations of talents. A man can be a deep-sea diver and also make china.' His art in particular captivated many famous minds, including Maya Angelou. 'His art makes my road less rocky, and my path less crooked,' Angelou said of a 2003 exhibit of his works. 'I was a big, agile, fast and a dedicated athlete,' Casey said in 1999. 'But I always wanted to be a painter.' Casey's professional acting career began with 'Guns of the Magnificent Seven,' a sequel to 'The Magnificent Seven,' in 1969. He appeared in some 35 films, including 'Boxcar Bertha,' ''The Man Who Fell to Earth,' ''Brian's Song' and 'Never Say Never Again.' Casey also starred opposite fellow NFL veteran Jim Brown in '...tick...tick...tick' and 'Black Gunn.' He played Lamda Lamda Lamda head U.N. Jefferson in 'Revenge of the Nerds' and John Slade in Keenan Ivory Wayans' Blaxploitation parody 'I'm Gonna Git You Sucka' from 1988. He also had a number of television credits including 'Star Trek: Deep Space Nine,' ''Murder She Wrote' and 'L.A. Law.
  • The Naval Criminal Investigative Service is investigating two female Navy hospital corpsmen in Florida who posted Snapchat photos making a newborn dance to rap music and giving the middle finger to another baby with a caption that said, 'How I currently feel about these mini Satans.' Vice Adm. C. Forrest Faison, the Navy's Surgeon General, has also ordered an immediate stand-down at all Navy medical commands to review policies, standards and 'our oaths, our pledges, our reasons for serving.' Faison said the review must be done within 48 hours. The 'highly offensive photos and videos,' said Faison, were 'shared on various platforms and ... viewed by hundreds of thousands of individuals.' That behavior, he said, is inconsistent with the Navy's core values, medical ethics and the oaths the corpsmen took for their profession. 'In an age where information can be shared instantly, what we say and post online must reflect the highest standards of character and conduct, in both our personal and professional lives,' Faison said in a message posted to the force. Faison also ordered an immediate prohibition on any personal cellphones in patient care areas, and told commanders to ensure no patient photos exist on social media. He also told commanders to personally contact all the current and expectant mothers planning to deliver children in Navy facilities, talk to them about what has been done and address their concerns. Navy Capt. Brenda Malone, spokeswoman for the Navy's Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, said the corpsmen were removed from any jobs involving direct patient care and appropriate action will be taken once the NCIS investigation is finished. She said NCIS would forward the results of the investigation to the appropriate command to determine if criminal prosecution is warranted.
  • A call to honor a black Civil War hero with a monument at the South Carolina Statehouse grounds, onetime epicenter of a groundswell movement to rid communities of Confederate symbols, is being made by two lawmakers in a bid to encourage consensus-building in a nation divided by the issue. Two state senators — a black Democrat and a white Republican — announced their proposal Wednesday to memorialize Robert Smalls, who in 1862 hijacked a Confederate supply ship he worked on, steered his family to freedom and delivered the ammunition-laden vessel to the Union. If approved, Smalls' would be the first monument on Statehouse grounds to an individual African-American in South Carolina, which removed the Confederate flag from those grounds in 2015 after a mass shooting by an avowed white supremacist. 'Robert Smalls was both a warrior and peacemaker, both a combative and kind man who accomplished incredible feats,' said Republican state Sen. Greg Gregory, who noted Smalls' titles after the war included state lawmaker and five-term congressman. 'Unfortunately, few people know of this man — one of our greatest citizens — and we're seeking to change that.' Moves to strip Confederate symbols from U.S. communities by those who see them as hated symbols of racism and slavery have triggered impassioned national debate and even violence like that arising from a white nationalist protest in Charlottesville, Virginia, over a Robert E. Lee statue. Others see such symbols as proud reminders of Southern heritage and ancestors who fought in the war. In South Carolina, a 2000 legislative compromise that took the Confederate battle flag off the Statehouse dome and put it beside a memorial on the Statehouse's front lawn also built a monument that broadly portrays centuries of African-American history in the state. That compromise also removed rebel flags from both chambers and barred altering any public monument that honors historic figures or events without overwhelming legislative approval. Still, the Confederate flag debate was far from settled. But lawmakers of both parties refused to revisit the issue until the 2015 death of nine black parishioners at a historic Charleston church prompted them to remove the flag altogether. Church gunman Dylann Roof, now on federal death row, was seen brandishing a Confederate flag in photographs that surfaced after his arrest. Sen. Darrell Jackson, D-Columbia, said he's long wanted Statehouse grounds to recognize the role of the hundreds of African-American politicians who served statewide during Reconstruction, particularly Smalls. He added the proposal is independent of calls to remove or alter other monuments around the state. He still intends to re-file a bill proposing to change the state's 'Heritage Act' — the 2000 compromise — to let local leaders make their own decisions about historical monuments in their communities. But he doesn't want that wrapped into the discussion on honoring Smalls. 'I'd rather spend my time building a monument than any time tearing down monuments,' Jackson said. 'History is not always good. Sometimes it's good. Sometimes it's bad, and sometimes it's ugly, but it's history, and it's important to tell the whole story.' One Statehouse monument some have called for removing or changing is a statue of 'Pitchfork' Ben Tillman, governor from 1890 to 1894 and then a U.S. senator. The inscription on Tillman's statue tells visitors he founded two universities as a 'friend and leader of the common people.' But it says nothing about his rise in power by the killing of black Republicans or his role in creating the Jim Crow-era of Southern segregation — white supremacy policies that Smalls opposed. After the flag's removal, House Speaker Jay Lucas vowed there won't be any further debate on amending the Heritage Act on his watch. His spokeswoman didn't immediately respond to the senators' proposal. House Minority Leader Todd Rutherford, D-Columbia, said a bill honoring Smalls should stand on its own. 'I think that's awesome,' he said, adding he only regrets that he didn't think of it first. Rutherford, who is black, said he recently learned all that Smalls accomplished during a visit to Beaufort County, where Smalls was born a slave and later purchased his former owner's home. Smalls' great-great grandson, Michael B. Moore, grew up hearing his grandmother's accounts of Smalls. He noted his famous ancestor took in his former owner's wife — who had dementia and still thought the property hers — letting her occupy the master bedroom until her death. 'We happen to be in a political climate that's very partisan and where people are often at each other's throats,' said Moore, of Charleston, adding Smalls' compassion on the former owner's wife was telling. 'To think about Robert in the way he acknowledged the humanity of this woman and embraced her in the way he did, that's something we can all learn from.
  • Breakfast Club' actor Anthony Michael Hall has pleaded no contest to shoving a neighbor who fell and broke his wrist. The 49-year-old Hall entered the plea in Los Angeles County Superior Court on Wednesday to one misdemeanor count of assault likely to produce injury. He was immediately sentenced to 40 hours of community service and three years of informal probation. Prosecutors say Hall and a next-door neighbor in Playa Del Rey got into an argument in September 2016 that ended with Hall pushing the man to the ground. Hall was a staple of early 1980s teen movies including 'The Breakfast Club' and 'Sixteen Candles.' He more recently appeared in 'The Dark Knight' and the TV series 'The Dead Zone.
  • The United States ramped up pressure Wednesday on Iraq's Kurds to abandon a planned referendum on independence, threatening to withdraw international support for negotiations with Baghdad if the vote isn't scrapped. In a forceful warning, the Trump administration said the costs of holding the Sept. 25 vote would be high 'for all Iraqis, including Kurds.' State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said the U.S. was urging the Kurds to 'accept the alternative' — talks between the northern Kurdish region and Iraq's central government that the U.S. and United Nations would facilitate. 'If this referendum is conducted, it is highly unlikely that there will be negotiations with Baghdad, and the above international offer of support for negotiations will be foreclosed,' Nauert said. The Iraqi Kurds intend to hold the vote in three governorates that form their self-ruled region, and also in disputed areas controlled by Kurdish forces but claimed by Iraq's government. That includes Kirkuk, an oil-rich but ethnically mixed province that the Kurds helped liberate from the Islamic State group. The U.S. has previously voiced opposition to the vote, out of concern an expected 'yes' vote would fracture Iraq and destabilize the broader region. But Wednesday's warning was the strongest to date from the U.S., reflecting growing concerns that the vote could imperil hard-fought progress in the country where the U.S. has been fighting since 2003. Naeurt said the planned referendum has already impeded the U.S.-led campaign to defeat the Islamic State group in its remaining strongholds in Iraq. She said IS and other extremist groups would exploit the tensions that would result from the referendum. 'All of Iraq's neighbors, and virtually the entire international community, also oppose this referendum,' Nauert said. One key U.S. ally — Israel — supports Kurdish independence in Iraq. Iraq's top court has temporarily suspended the vote, and the country's parliament has also voted to reject it. Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi has even said he's prepared to intervene militarily if the vote leads to violence. But Kurdish officials have continued to say the vote will be held nonetheless. The Kurds are an ethnic group with populations in Iraq, Syria, Iran and Turkey. In Iraq, the Kurds have long aspired to statehood, and were harshly oppressed under Saddam Hussein. ___ Reach Josh Lederman on Twitter at http://twitter.com/joshledermanAP
  • When a wall of water came toward him, all Cesar Garcia could think to do was protect his young daughter and try to save his nephew. Garcia and his extended family were celebrating his sister's birthday with a trip from Phoenix to a waterfall known as Water Wheel in the central Arizona wilderness. The family, including his mother, sisters and brother, brother-in-law, nieces and nephews, were a mile into their hike when a flash flood hit July 15, an unrelenting torrent that killed everyone in the group of 14 but Garcia, his wife and two children. 'All of the sudden this wave appeared from far away, and I screamed to them, 'Hey, let's get out of the way! Let's get out of the way!' But it was coming too fast, we couldn't do anything,' he told The Associated Press in his Phoenix home Wednesday. Garcia instinctively clutched his 1-year-old daughter, Marina, and grabbed the shirt of his nephew who had fallen. But the boy slipped from his grasp. 'I couldn't hold on to him,' he said. 'After that, it was just water, debris.' Rocks and trees in the water slammed into Garcia, tearing flesh from his legs and bruising his rib as he tried to shield his tiny daughter. The pair went under and Garcia was able to grab hold of a bush. But the force of the torrent was too strong, and they were washed away a second time, swallowed up by the muddy slurry tearing through jagged rocks. 'All I could think of was like, 'Hold on to my baby.' If I didn't hold on to her, she was going to be gone,' he said. 'You don't really think about saving yourself, you just think about the kids. You get hit, whatever, you just hold on to them, never let them go,' he said. Garcia managed to latch on to a tree, still keeping his grip on little Marina. Soon, hikers appeared, and he asked if they had seen any others. Yes, they said, a little way up was Garcia's wife. Nearby was his then-8-year-old son, who escaped the water's fury largely unscathed. Garcia said his instinct was to help the children near him, and he believes that's how his family reacted as well. Five children were among the 10 people who died in an instant. '(The adults) didn't want to save themselves because they were looking after the kids,' he said. Garcia and Marina had been swept about 40 yards (meters) downstream, and he clung to the tree for two hours as rescuers waited for the water to recede. It was frigid, he said, but a hiker gave him a towel to wrap around his daughter. It was while recovering in the hospital that he learned the fate of the rest of his relatives. They had all been within 10 to 15 feet (3 to 4.5 meters) of one another on the hike, but somehow it was Garcia's immediate family who survived. 'What are the chances that our tiny little family survived and the rest of our family didn't?' he said. 'I will ask myself, 'Why? Why me?'' Recovering from the physical and emotional effects has been difficult. 'The first couple weeks were really hard. I had a lot of nightmares and I couldn't sleep,' he said. His daughter was tormented in the early days as well, screaming, 'Agua, agua!' in her sleep, which is Spanish for 'water.' Immediately after the terror of that day, Garcia felt like he would never again go back to that site. 'I didn't want to go back there, but right now, I feel the need to go back there. I don't know. I just feel like it's something I need to do,' he said. ___ Follow Alina Hartounian on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/ahartoun .
  • President Donald Trump is considering a further reduction in the number of refugees allowed into the United States as the administration works to re-shape American immigration policy, officials said Wednesday. Trump, who has already slashed refugee admissions once since taking office, is now weighing limiting even further the number of refugees allowed into the country in the next fiscal year. But as is often the case with the Trump administration, Cabinet officials are divided as they weigh the costs and potential security risks associated with the program. The Department of Homeland Security has been pushing for a reduction beyond the 50,000 mark set by Trump earlier this year as part of his travel ban executive orders — a number that is already the lowest in modern American history. In a proposal submitted late last week, the department called for a reduction to 40,000 refugees in the next fiscal year, citing concerns about its workload and ability to adequately vet those seeking entry. The State Department, which oversees the program, has formally recommended that the number be kept at 50,000, according to Trump administration officials who spoke on condition of anonymity in order to discuss internal deliberations. Agencies had been given until the close of business Wednesday to submit formal recommendations for consideration. State Department officials would have been inclined to set their recommendation higher, several of the people said, but were taking their cues from the president's executive order and felt that 50,000 was the highest number that would be palatable to him. Trump has until Oct. 1, the start of the new fiscal year, to determine how many refugees to admit under the Refugee Act of 1980. Trump is expected to consider the issue over the weekend, after he finishes up at the U.N. General Assembly in New York, one White House official said. The U.S. welcomed 84,995 refugees in fiscal year 2016, and former President Barack Obama had wanted to raise that number to 110,000 in 2017. Trump has made limiting immigration the centerpiece of his agenda. He temporarily banned visitors from a handful of Muslim-majority nations, has revoked an Obama-era executive action protecting young immigrants from deportation and insists he'll build a wall along the southern border. During his campaign, Trump pledged to 'stop the massive inflow of refugees' and warned that terrorists were smuggling themselves into naive countries by posing as refugees fleeing war-torn Syria. 'Thousands of refugees are being admitted with no way to screen them and are instantly made eligible for welfare and free health care, even as our own veterans, our great, great veterans, die while they're waiting online for medical care that they desperately need,' Trump said last October. Instead, Trump has advocated keeping refugees closer to their homes. In a speech to the United Nations on Tuesday, Trump thanked Jordan, Turkey and Lebanon for taking in hundreds of thousands of refugees from the Syrian conflict, and described the United States as a 'compassionate nation' that has spent 'billions and billions of dollars in helping to support this effort.' 'We seek an approach to refugee resettlement that is designed to help these horribly treated people, and which enables their eventual return to their home countries to be part of the rebuilding process,' he said, arguing that, for the cost of resettling one refugee in the United States, the U.S. can assist more than 10 migrants in their home regions. Advocates say that misses the point. 'I think that these comments show a basic misunderstanding of the refugee crisis,' said Jen Smyers, who helps run the immigration and refugee program at Church World Service, one of nine organizations that work to resettle refugees in the U.S. She said the safe re-integration of refugees into their home countries is always the preferred outcome, followed by integration in a nearby country that shares a refugee's language and culture. Resettlement is a last resort when those options are impossible. Refugees already face an extensive backlog and waiting periods that can take years. Smyers said that after Trump's executive order, she had to tell refugees in the pipeline they'd be waiting even longer. 'It's devastating for refugees who are overseas,' she said. Stacie Blake, of the U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, said the proposed cutbacks were especially concerning given the migrant crises affecting so many parts of the word, including the Rohingya Muslim refugees fleeing Myanmar. She said Trump's move could prompt other nations to 'back out' as well. White House spokeswoman Kelly Love said in a statement that the administration's approach to refugee resettlement 'is unwavering' and would be 'guided by the safety and security of the American people, the protection of U.S. taxpayers, and the application of U.S. resources in a manner that stretches our dollars to help the most people.' DHS spokesman David Lapan said that in setting the admissions ceiling, the agency would take into account the 'workload capacity of all program partners, including the vetting agencies' as well as national security interests. Simon Henshaw, the top State Department official for refugees, said the decision was ultimately Trump's. __ Associated Press writer Josh Lederman contributed from New York.
  • The United Nations has proposed a new approach to solve the Libyan crisis, by amending a current political agreement, holding a constitutional referendum and general elections. U.N. envoy Ghassan Salame said in a statement Wednesday after a 'high-level event on Libya' on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly in New York that Libyans deserve 'an end to uncertainty and unpredictability.' Salame says he didn't design the 'Action Plan for Libya,' but that it was drafted in consultation with Libyans he met across the country and that it therefore is 'in essence, a synthesis of their hopes and goals.' Libya sank into chaos following the 2011 uprising that toppled and killed dictator Moammar Gadhafi. It is split between rival parliaments, governments and militias in the east and west.