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    Injured point guard Derrick Rose has been excused from the Cavaliers to handle a personal matter.A team spokesman said Friday that Rose, who has been sidelined with an ankle injury, has not been with the team since Wednesday and there is no timetable on when he'll return.ESPN is reporting that the former league MVP is 're-evaluating his future in the NBA.'Rose has played in just seven games this season and has been slowed by a left ankle injury sustained on Oct. 20 in Milwaukee. He's averaging 14.3 points per game in his first season with Cleveland.Rose's career has been slowed by knee injuries. He sat out the 2012-13 season and played only 10 games the following year due to injury.He signed a one-year, $2.1 million contract this summer with Cleveland to be the team's backup point guard but was rushed into a starting role as Isaiah Thomas is out with a hip injury.
  • Mikal Bridges scored 18 points and No. 5 Villanova pulled away down the stretch to beat Northern Iowa 64-50 in Friday's Battle 4 Atlantis championship game.Jalen Brunson added 16 points and was named the tournament's most valuable player for Villanova (6-0). The Wildcats led most of the way then used an 8-0 run in the final 4 minutes to turn away the Panthers.It marked Villanova's 17th straight win in a November tournament and marked the Wildcats' fifth straight year with a championship, including the 2013 Atlantis title.Juwan McCloud scored 13 points to lead the Panthers (5-2), who made just 6 of 23 3-pointers and didn't get to the free-throw line.The Panthers got within 51-45 on Spencer Haldeman's 3 with 5:33 left, but Phil Booth answered with a 3. Then, after Eric Paschall's score, Bridges hit a 3 to push the lead to 14 with 2:03 left.BIG PICTURENorthern Iowa: The Panthers finished with two wins in three games in the Bahamas, starting with a 61-58 win against SMU then getting a couple of late baskets to beat North Carolina State 64-60 on Thanksgiving day. They just couldn't complete the three-day run — and now they've faced the past two national champions (they lost to 2017 champion North Carolina in the opener) in the season's opening month.Villanova: The Wildcats managed to avoid the trouble that befell fellow ranked teams Arizona (No. 2) and Purdue (No. 18) in Atlantis. They used a second-half spurt to pull away from Western Kentucky 66-58 in Round 1, then ran off a bigger one — 23-2 — to erase a double-digit deficit and beat Tennessee 85-76 in the semifinals. And Bridges' leap from last year has built a scary 1-2 punch with Brunson, a preseason Associated Press all-American.UP NEXTNorthern Iowa: The Panthers host UNLV on Wednesday.Villanova: The Wildcats host Penn on Wednesday in a Big Five matchup.___More AP college basketball: http://collegebasketball.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_Top25___Follow Aaron Beard on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/aaronbeardap
  • Since The New York Times published allegations of sexual harassment and assault against Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein in October, multiple men in entertainment, media and politics in the U.S. and beyond have faced allegations ranging from inappropriate behavior to forced sexual misconduct to rape.To be sure, prominent men have faced sexual misconduct claims before. But the accusations against Weinstein have opened a floodgate, sparked an international conversation and put new pressure on companies, industries, and political leaders to respond. President Donald Trump has condemned some of the accused, been more muted about others, and found himself again being asked about sexual harassment and misconduct allegations leveled against him during last year's presidential campaign. The Republican says they're fake.The #Metoo moment is also prompting re-examination of past sexual misconduct claims against powerful men, including Democratic former President Bill Clinton in the 1990s. He was impeached and then acquitted of perjury and obstruction of lawmakers' investigation into his sexual encounters with a White House intern, and he settled a sexual harassment lawsuit stemming from his time as Arkansas governor.A look at some of the men accused since the Weinstein accusations emerged:Entertainment:— Celebrity chef John Besh — Accused by 25 women of sexual harassment. He has stepped down from the company he founded.— Singer Nick Carter — Accused by pop singer Melissa Schuman of raping her approximately 15 years ago. Carter has denied her allegations.— Comedian Louis C.K. — Accused by five women of sexual misconduct. Planned release of film 'I Love You, Daddy' halted. Netflix special canceled. He says the allegations are true and has apologized.— Cinefamily executives Hadrian Belove and Shadie Elnashai — Accused of sexual misconduct. Movie theater shut down in the wake of allegations due to crippling debt.— Actor Richard Dreyfuss — One woman alleges sexual harassment. He denies the allegation.— Film producer Adam Fields — Accused of offering a promotion to a woman at his former employer, Relativity Media, in exchange for sex. He has denied the allegations.— Director-producer Gary Goddard — Accused by one man of sexually molesting him when the man was 12. He denies the allegation.— Casting employee Andy Henry — Admitted to urging women to take off their clothes during coaching sessions in 2008 while working on the 'CSI' series. He was fired by his current employer.— Actor Dustin Hoffman — Accused by woman of sexual harassing when she was 17. He has apologized for his behavior.— Actor Robert Knepper — Accused by one woman of sexual assault. He denies the allegations.— Showrunner Andrew Kreisberg — Accused by 19 women of sexual harassment and inappropriate touching. The 'Supergirl' and 'Arrow' showrunner has been suspended by Warner Bros. Television Group. He told Variety he has made comments on women's appearances and clothes 'but they were not sexualized.'— Pixar and Disney Animation chief John Lasseter — Accused by several women of unwanted touching and has announced he is taking a six-month leave of absence. He has acknowledged some 'missteps' with employees and apologized for any behavior that made workers uncomfortable.— Actor Jeremy Piven — Accused by three women of sexual misconduct. He denies all allegations.— Filmmaker Brett Ratner — Accused by at least six women of sexual harassment. Playboy shelved projects with Ratner and Ratner stepped away from Warner Bros. related activities. He denies the allegations.— Comedy festival organizer Gilbert Rozon — Accused by at least nine women of sexually harassing or sexually assaulting them. Rozon stepped down as president of Montreal's renowned 'Just for Laughs' festival and apologized 'to all those I have offended during my life.'— Producer Chris Savino — Accused of harassing up to 12 women. Fired from Nickelodeon. He has apologized for his behavior.— Actor Steven Seagal — Accused by two women of rape. He denies the allegations.— Def Jam Records mogul Russell Simmons — Accused by model Keri Claussen Khalighi of coercing her to perform a sex act and later penetrating her without her consent in his New York apartment in 1991. Simmons has disputed her account, saying the relationship was consensual.— Actor Tom Sizemore — Accused of groping an 11-year-old actress in 2003. Utah prosecutors declined to file charges, citing witness and evidence problems. He denies the allegation.— Actor Kevin Spacey — Accused by at least 24 men of sexual misconduct or assault. London police reportedly investigating two sexual assaults. Fired from 'House of Cards' and replaced in Ridley Scott's completed film 'All the Money in the World.' Massachusetts prosecutors are investigating one allegation. His former publicist has said he is seeking unspecified treatment.— Actor Jeffrey Tambor — Two women — an actress on his show 'Transparent' and his assistant — allege sexual misconduct. He denies the allegation, saying in a statement that he has 'never been a predator — ever.' Tambor said this week he doesn't see how he can return to the Amazon series.— Actor George Takei — One man alleges sexual assault. He denies the allegation.— Writer-director James Toback — Accused by hundreds of women of sexual harassment. Beverly Hills police investigating complaints. He has denied the allegations to the Los Angeles Times.— 'Mad Men' creator Matthew Weiner — Accused by one woman of sexual harassment. He denies the allegation.— Producer Harvey Weinstein — Accused by dozens of women of sexual harassment or sexual assaults, including rape. Fired by The Weinstein Co. and expelled from various professional guilds. Under investigation by police departments in New York, London, Beverly Hills and Los Angeles. Weinstein denies all allegations of non-consensual sex, but he has apologized for causing 'a lot of pain' with 'the way I've behaved with colleagues in the past.'— Actor Ed Westwick — Accused by two women of sexual assault. The BBC pulled an Agatha Christie adaptation from its television schedule and halted production on a second sitcom starring the former 'Gossip Girl' actor. Los Angeles police are investigating. He denies the allegations.___Media, publishing and business:— Billboard magazine executive Stephen Blackwell — Accused of sexual harassment by one woman. He has resigned from the magazine.— Penguin Random House art director Giuseppe Castellano — Accused by one woman of sexual harassment. Penguin Random House is investigating. Castellano has not commented.— New Republic publisher Hamilton Fish— Multiple sexual harassment allegations. He has resigned from the magazine.— Journalist Mark Halperin — Accused of harassing about 12 women while at ABC News. Book contract terminated. Fired from job at NBC News. He has denied some of the allegations.— Artforum publisher Knight Landesman — Accused by multiple women of sexual harassment and sued by one woman. He has resigned from the magazine.— NPR news chief Michael Oreskes — Accused of inappropriate behavior or sexual harassment by at least four women while at The New York Times, NPR and The Associated Press. He has been ousted from NPR.— Amazon executive Roy Price — Accused by one woman of sexual harassment. He resigned from Amazon.— PBS and CBS host Charlie Rose — Accused by several women of unwanted sexual advances, groping and grabbing women, walking naked in front of them or making lewd phone calls. He has apologized for his behavior, but has questioned the accuracy of some of the accounts.— New York Times White House reporter Glenn Thrush — Accused of making drunken, unwanted advances on women. He disputes some of the accusations but has said he had had a drinking problem and apologized for 'any situation where I behaved inappropriately.'— Webster Public Relations CEO Kirt Webster — Accused of sexual assault by one woman. Firm renamed and Webster is 'taking time away.'— Rolling Stone publisher Jann Wenner — Accused by one man of sexual harassment. He says he did not intend to make the accuser uncomfortable.— New Republic editor Leon Wieseltier — Accused of sexually harassing numerous women. Removed from the masthead of The Atlantic magazine. He has apologized for his behavior.— NBC News booker Matt Zimmerman — Accused of inappropriate conduct by multiple women at the network. He was fired from NBC.___Politics:— Florida Democratic Party Chairman Stephen Bittel — Accused of sexually inappropriate comments and behavior toward a number of women, Bittel resigned. Meanwhile, Democratic state Sen. Jeff Clemens resigned after a report that he had an extramarital affair with a lobbyist, and Republican state Sen. Jack Latvala is being investigated by the Senate over allegations of harassment and groping. Latvala has denied the allegations.— Former President George H.W. Bush — Accused of patting seven women below the waist while posing for photos with them in recent years, well after he left office. The 93-year-old Republican has issued repeated apologies through a spokesman 'to anyone he has offended,' with the spokesman noting that the former president uses a wheelchair and that his arm sinks below people's waists when they take photos with him.— U.S. Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.) — Accused of sexual harassment toward staffers in his office, and has settled one claim of harassment. He has denied the allegations, even the one he settled.— Two Minnesota state lawmakers — Democratic Sen. Dan Schoen and Republican Rep. Tony Cornish — said they would resign after they were accused of misdeeds that ranged from groping colleagues to persistent unwanted sexual advances and sexting.— British Defense Secretary Michael Fallon — Accused of inappropriate advances on two women, the Conservative resigned. Sexual harassment and assault allegations have also emerged against a number of other U.K. political figures. Labour Party legislator Carl Sargeant is believed to have taken his own life after harassment allegations cost him his post as the Welsh government's Cabinet secretary for communities and children. He had asked for an independent inquiry to clear his name. Also, Labour Party member Ivan Lewis has been suspended over an allegation of sexual misconduct; Lewis disputed the account but apologized if his behavior had been 'unwelcome or inappropriate.'— U.S. Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) — Accused of forcibly kissing Los Angeles radio anchor Leeann Tweeden while rehearsing for a 2006 USO tour; Franken also was photographed with his hands over her breasts as she slept. He also has been accused by three other women of touched their buttocks. Franken has apologized, though hasn't admitted to groping or other inappropriate touching. He has acknowledged that some women felt that he had done something offensive during their encounters. He faces a Senate ethics investigation for improper conduct.— Kentucky House Speaker Jeff Hoover — Stepped down as speaker this month after news surfaced that the Republican had settled a sexual harassment claim from a GOP caucus staffer. Hoover denied the harassment allegation but said he sent consensual yet inappropriate text messages. He remains in the Legislature.— U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore (R.-Ala.) —Accused of sexually assaulting two women decades ago when they were teenagers; about a half-dozen other women have accused Moore of inappropriate conduct. The former state Supreme Court chief justice denies the allegations. He has rebuffed pressure from national Republican leaders to step aside; the state GOP is standing by him.— Johnny Anderson, a staffer for Democratic Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards — The deputy chief of staff for programs and planning resigned to avoid becoming a 'distraction' to the governor. Accused of sexual harassment, he denies any wrongdoing.___Sports:— International Olympic Committee member Alex Gilady — Accused by two women of rape and by two others of inappropriate conduct. Gilady denied the rape accusations, said he didn't recall one of the other allegations, but acknowledged a claim he'd propositioned a woman during a job interview 25 years ago was 'mainly correct.' He stepped down as president of an Israeli broadcasting company he founded. The IOC has said it is looking into the allegations.— Former South African soccer association president Danny Jordaan — Accused by former member of parliament Jennifer Ferguson of raping her in 1993. Jordaan denies the accusation.
  • Beyond the slick, Hollywood-style cinematics, the Islamic State is targeting Western recruits with videos suggesting they, too, can be heroes like Bruce Willis' character in 'Die Hard.'That's the conclusion of The Chicago Project on Security and Threats, which analyzed some 1,400 videos released by IS between 2013 and 2016. Researchers who watched and catalogued them all said there is more to the recruitment effort than just sophisticated videography, and it's not necessarily all about Islam.Instead, Robert Pape, who directs the security center, said the extremist group is targeting Westerners — especially recent Muslim converts — with videos that follow, nearly step-by-step, a screenwriter's standard blueprint for heroic storytelling.'It's the heroic screenplay journey, the same thing that's in Wonder Woman, where you have someone who is learning his or her own powers through the course of their reluctant journey to be hero,' Pape said.The project at the University of Chicago separately has assembled a database of people who have been indicted in the United States for activities related to IS. Thirty-six percent were recent converts to Islam and did not come from established Muslim communities, according to the project. Eighty-three percent watched IS videos, the project said.The group's success in using heroic storytelling is prompting copycats, Pape said. The research shows al-Qaida's Syria affiliate has been mimicking IS' heroic narrative approach in its own recruitment films. 'We have a pattern that's emerging,' Pape said.Intelligence and law enforcement officials aren't sure the approach is all that new. They say IS has been using any method that works to recruit Westerners. Other terrorism researchers think IS' message is still firmly rooted in religious extremism.Rita Katz, director of SITE Intelligence Group, which tracks messaging by militant groups, agrees that IS makes strong, visual appeals resembling Hollywood movies and video games, making its media operation more successful than al-Qaida's. And IS videos can attract hero wannabes, she said.'However, these features of IS media are only assets to a core message it uses to recruit,' Katz said. 'At the foundation of IS recruitment propaganda is not so much the promise to be a Hollywood-esque hero, but a religious hero. There is a big difference between the two.'When a fighter sits in front of a camera and calls for attacks, Katz said, he will likely frame it as revenge for Muslims killed or oppressed somewhere in the world. The message is designed to depict any terror attack in that nation as justified and allow the attacker to die as a martyr, she said.The promise of religious martyrdom is powerful to anybody regardless of whether they are rich or poor, happy or unhappy, steeped in religion or not at all, she said.Pape said he knows he's challenging conventional wisdom when he says Westerners are being coaxed to join IS ranks not because of religious beliefs, but because of the group's message of personal empowerment and Western concepts of individualism.How else can one explain Western attackers' loose connections to Islam, or their scarce knowledge of IS's strict, conservative Sharia law, he asked. IS is embracing, not rejecting, Western culture and ideals, to mobilize Americans, he said.'This is a journey like Clint Eastwood,' Pape said, recalling Eastwood's 1970s performance in 'High Plains Drifter' about a stranger who doles out justice in a corrupt mining town. 'When Clint Eastwood goes in to save the town, he's not doing it because he loves them. He even has contempt for the people he's saving. He's saving it because he's superior,' Pape said.'That's Bruce Willis in 'Die Hard.' That's Wonder Woman. ... Hollywood has figured out that's what puts hundreds of millions in theater seats,' Pape said. 'IS has figured out that's how to get Westerners.'Pape said the narrative in the recruitment videos targeting westerners closely tracks Chris Vogler's 12-step guide titled 'The Writer's Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers.' The book is based on a narrative identified by scholar Joseph Campbell that appears in drama and other storytelling.Step No. 1 in Vogler's guide is portraying a character in his 'ordinary world.'An example is a March 25, 2016, video released by al-Qaida's Syria branch about a young British man with roots in the Indian community. It starts: 'Let us tell you the story of a real man... Abu Basir, as we knew him, came from central London. He was a graduate of law and a teacher by profession.'Vogler's ninth step is about how the hero survives death, emerging from battle to begin a transformation, sometimes with a prize.In the al-Qaida video, the Brit runs through sniper fire in battle. He then lays down his weapon and picks up a pen to start his new vocation blogging and posting Twitter messages for the cause.Matthew Levitt, a terrorism expert at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, says it doesn't surprise him that IS would capitalize on what he dubs the 'zero to hero' strategy because the organization is very pragmatic and accepts recruits regardless of their commitment to Islamic extremism.Heroic aspirations are only one reason for joining the ranks of IS, he said. Criminals also seek the cover of IS to commit crimes. Others sign up because they want to belong to something.'I've never seen a case of radicalization that was 100 percent one way or the other,' Levitt said.
  • Police in Paris say a tiger escaped from a circus in the city and roamed the streets of the French capital for 'some time' before being killed.Police said that the big cat was 'neutralized' by a staff member from the circus near a bridge over the River Seine, about two kilometers (1.24 miles) from the Eiffel Tower.Police authorities tweeted 'all danger is over' alongside a tiger emoticon.A Paris police official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, confirmed that the tiger had been loose for 'some time' Friday but said there had been no reported injuries or casualties.Residents in the 15th district where the tiger was shot circulated photos of the beast's limp corpse on social media — many angry that it had been killed.
  • Israeli media reports that the country's health minister, who heads a powerful ultra-Orthodox political party in Benjamin Netanyahu's coalition, is resigning over railway infrastructure work taking place on the Sabbath, when all labor is prohibited according to Jewish law.Channel 10 TV and other media reported Friday that Yaakov Litzman told the prime minister he will step down on Sunday over the issue.It could spell trouble for Netanyahu if other Ultra-Orthodox Jewish politicians follow Litzman's lead.Ultra-Orthodox parties offer Netanyahu support to stabilize his coalition, while the government carves out large budgets for their community's schools and seminaries.Much of Israel comes to a halt at sundown Friday for the Sabbath.
  • President Donald Trump is feuding with LaVar Ball and LeVar Burton is taking the hit on Twitter.Burton is an actor best known for playing Lt. La Forge in 'Star Trek' on TV and film and for championing kids' education through the 'Reading Rainbow' series. Ball is the father of Los Angeles Lakers rookie Lonzo Ball and UCLA basketball player LiAngelo Ball, one of three student players recently arrested in China for shoplifting.Trump tweeted that Ball was an 'ungrateful fool' for not being more appreciative of presidential intervention in LiAngelo Ball's case. Some of the president's followers in turn attacked Burton on Twitter, with one calling him a 'has been actor with a thief for a son.'Burton and Ball haven't let the controversy interrupt their holiday plans — both tweeted Thanksgiving wishes to their followers Thursday.
  • Steven Holcomb remains a winner of three Olympic medals. He will have held only one of them. Another round of International Olympic Committee sanctions against Russian athletes who were found to have participated in doping at the 2014 Sochi Games came down Friday, headlined by bobsledder Aleksandr Zubkov being stripped of the gold medals he won in two- and four-man events. Holcomb, who died in May, will posthumously move up one spot from bronze to silver in each of those races, once the medals are formally reallocated. 'It's going to be weird for his family and it's going to be weird for us,' U.S. veteran push athlete Chris Fogt, who was part of Holcomb's four-man team in Sochi, said after the IOC decision Friday. 'I'd like to think that we would be all together when it happens. And when we get those medals, we're not going to have him there.' A half-dozen U.S. bobsled and skeleton athletes are going to benefit from the Russian medalist disqualifications. Skeleton racer Matt Antoine and bobsledders Holcomb, Fogt, Steven Langton and Curt Tomasevicz all left Sochi with bronzes and will be getting silvers. Skeleton racer Katie Uhlaender will be getting her first medal, with her finish upgraded from fourth to bronze. And combined, they'll be collecting a total of $45,000 in additional bonus money from the U.S. Olympic Committee, which rewards medal performances. Now comes a delicate matter, with Holcomb's family likely having to surrender his bronzes and await the exchange for the silvers. Holcomb's father and one of his sisters wore the bronze medals at his memorial service in May in Lake Placid, New York. 'It's definitely a little bittersweet that Holcomb isn't here to see this happening,' said Langton, who was with Holcomb for the two-man medal-winning ride in Sochi and was also in the four-man sled with Holcomb, Fogt and Tomasevicz. 'He worked hard and he earned those medals. It would have been very nice if he had the chance to enjoy them.' Zubkov has been at World Cup races this season as president of the Russian bobsled federation. Unless the ruling is overturned on appeal, he won't be at the Pyeongchang Olympics this winter, or any other Olympics. The IOC says sanctions against him — and other athletes found to have doped — include lifetime banishment from the games. The International Bobsled and Skeleton Federation provisionally suspended Russian skeleton athletes Aleksandr Tretiakov and Elena Nikitina from World Cup events — both won medals in Sochi that were stripped this week. It's likely that a similar ban could be issued to the bobsledders involved in Friday's IOC ruling, including Zubkov. 'It's important to be able to move forward,' said USA Bobsled and Skeleton CEO Darrin Steele, also an executive with the IBSF. 'No doubt about it.' Pending the IBSF changing results as the IOC has asked, the two-man gold medal will now almost certainly go to Beat Hefti and Alex Baumann of Switzerland. The four-man gold medal would go to the Latvian sled driven by Oskars Melbardis and pushed by Arvis Vilkaste, Daumants Dreiskens and Janis Strenga. Holcomb's sleds would get the silver in both races. Russia would get the bronze in both, with driver Alexander Kasjanov — who had a pair of fourth-place showings in Sochi — set for the upgrade. Neither Kasjanov nor any member of his team has been sanctioned by the IOC in relation to the doping scandal. Langton said he's pleased that the process, which sliding athletes from countless countries have been monitoring in anticipation of the disqualifications, is finally nearing an end. 'I had faith that the people handling it would handle it appropriately,' Langton said.
  • A federal lawsuit set to go to trial next month marks the latest legal action brought against former Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio over allegations that he pursued a trumped-up criminal case to get publicity and embarrass an adversary.The political opponent in this case: U.S. Sen. Jeff Flake.One of Flake's sons filed a malicious-prosecution lawsuit, saying Arpaio pursued felony animal cruelty charges against him and his then-wife in a bid to do political damage to the senator and gain publicity.Austin Flake and his wife were charged in the heat-exhaustion deaths of 21 dogs in June 2014 at a kennel operated by his in-laws. The Flakes were watching the dogs when the in-laws were out of town.The dogs died when an air conditioning unit failed in a small room where the animals spent the night.The case against the Flakes was dismissed at the request of prosecutors, and the owners of the kennel pleaded guilty to animal cruelty charges after an expert determined the air conditioner failed because the operators didn't properly maintain it.The lawsuit, which is scheduled for trial on Dec. 5, alleges that Arpaio was intent on linking the Flakes to the deaths, going so far as to conduct surveillance on the senator's home. The suit also says Arpaio's investigators examined phone records to see if the younger Flake called his father during the time he was watching the dogs.Lawyers for Austin Flake and his then-wife have said the senator disagreed with Arpaio over immigration and was critical of the movement questioning the authenticity of then-President Barack Obama's birth certificate.In a deposition, Arpaio didn't accept responsibility for bringing the charges against the couple and was unable to cite any evidence to support the allegations. But he still expressed confidence in his investigators.'I am going by what my detectives accomplished during their investigation,' Arpaio said during the July 2016 deposition. 'They had the nuts and bolts already. I defend my people. I have confidence in them. I don't have to know everything that's going on.'Arpaio and Jeffrey Leonard, an attorney representing Maricopa County and the former sheriff, declined to comment on the case.Stephen Montoya, an attorney for Austin Flake and his former wife, Logan Brown, said the sheriff's office didn't have evidence showing his clients intended to hurt the dogs, yet still charged them with crimes that devastated them and contributed to the demise of their marriage.'It splashed their names across the internet as the murderers of 21 dogs. It really ravaged them emotionally,' Montoya said, noting that Austin Flake was 21 and his wife was 20 at the time.A ruling in August by U.S. District Judge Neil Wake dismissed a defamation allegation from the lawsuit but determined investigators didn't have probable cause to charge the couple.'A factfinder could thus reasonably find that the prosecutors initially charged the Flakes based on pressure from Arpaio,' Wake wrote.The prosecutor who brought the allegations said in a court filing that she wasn't pressured by Arpaio's office to prosecute the couple and that the decision to present the case to a grand jury was made by her and her supervisors. The Maricopa County Attorney's Office isn't named as a party in the lawsuit.The lawsuit doesn't specify how much money the younger Flake and his ex-wife are seeking. But they previously sought $4 million in a notice of claim — a precursor to a lawsuit.It isn't the first time Arpaio has been accused of trumping up charges in an animal cruelty case.He launched an investigation against a police officer from the Phoenix suburb of Chandler over a 2007 death of a police dog that was left in a hot vehicle for 12 hours in blistering summer heat.The officer was charged with animal abuse but eventually acquitted. He filed a lawsuit alleging Arpaio brought the criminal case so the sheriff could exploit the publicity.Taxpayers paid $775,000 to the officer to settle the case.___Follow Jacques Billeaud at twitter.com/jacquesbilleaud. His work can be found at https://www.apnews.com/search/jacques%20billeaud .
  • A lawyer says a Turkish court has released a former British soldier from jail pending the outcome of his trial for alleged membership of a terrorist organization.Joe Robinson was arrested while on holiday in Turkey, accused of fighting alongside Syrian Kurdish militia against the Islamic State group in Syria.Lawyer Mehmet Baykara said the court in western Turkey, ordered him released from jail on Friday on condition that he regularly report to police. Trial was adjourned until March 12.His girlfriend, a Bulgarian citizen, who is accused of engaging in terror propaganda, was released on bail earlier.Turkey considers the militia group a terror organization because of its outlawed Kurdish rebels in Turkey.Robinson denies fighting alongside the militia, insisting he traveled to Syria to provide medical aid.