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    A British man and his young daughter have gained international attention for being fined for selling lemonade. Andre Spicer said his 5-year-old daughter was left in tears after local council officers fined her 150 pounds ($195) for selling lemonade without a license near their home in London. The girl was selling home-made lemonade to fans attending the Lovebox dance festival when she was fined. The four officers approached the girl and began speaking in technical legal terms, telling her that her lemonade stand infringed on local business rights. Halfway through the interaction with the officers, Spicer said his daughter burst into tears and said 'I've done a bad thing, daddy. I've done something wrong.' 'I think initially she was a bit shocked and sad,' Spicer said. 'And then I suggested we try it again with a permit. And she said: 'Oh, it's a bit scary.'' He hopes that his daughter will overcome the 'heart-wrenching' experience and continue to pursue entrepreneurial ideas. Spicer wrote an article about the incident for the Daily Telegraph that garnered hundreds of comments and shares online. Local officials said the fine will be cancelled immediately. They have apologized to the family. In a statement Friday, the council said it was 'very sorry' about what happened and that its enforcement officers are expected to 'show common sense, and to use their powers sensibly. This clearly did not happen.
  • The United States said Friday that an airstrike in Afghanistan's southern Helmand province killed an unspecified number of Afghan security forces. The provincial governor confirmed the deaths, saying at least two commanders were among those killed but the final death count was not immediately known. The Department of Defense said the U.S. was supporting Afghan troops, who were carrying out an operation against the Taliban in the province's Gereshk district, when the bombing took place. 'We would like to express our deepest condolences to the families affected by this unfortunate incident,' the statement said. 'During a U.S. supported ANDSF (Afghan National Defense Security Force) operation, aerial fires resulted in the deaths of the friendly Afghan forces who were gathered in a compound.' Helmand provincial Governor Hayatullah Hayat said the NATO airstrike hit on Friday and that at least two Afghan commanders died. He added that the death toll was expected to rise further because several security force personnel were known to have been in the compound at the time. Hayat also said many of the security forces were not in uniform, which may have caused some confusion about their identities. The incident was still under investigation, he said. While much of Helmand province is under the control of the Taliban, the Afghan national security forces have been waging fierce battles to retake territory. NATO and U.S. troops are in Helmand to assist the Afghan troops. Elsewhere in Afghanistan an insurgent attack in western Ghor province killed four police officers and wounded seven. Mohammad Mustafa Moseni, Ghor's provincial police chief, said Friday that the Taliban attacked police compounds in the provincial districts of Taywara and Pasaband, considered key to the security of the provincial capital. The attacks, which occurred overnight, resulted in a four-hour gunbattle in which 24 Taliban were killed, said Moseni. In northern Baghlan province, fighting has raged for days on a key highway linking several northern provinces to the capital of Kabul. Hospital officials said eight local police and two civilians died earlier this week in one incident. Deputy provincial police chief Said Amir Gul Hussainkhil said the fighting is continuing but it is sporadic. ___ Associated Press writer Robert Burns in Washington contributed to this report
  • The nation's largest doctors' group urged senators on Friday to stop trying to repeal or replace Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act and instead begin a bipartisan effort to stabilize the insurance marketplace. The American Medical Association said proposed Republican bills — one to repeal and replace the 2010 health law, the other to repeal only — would cause too many people to lose coverage. 'Each bill results in millions more Americans without health insurance coverage, weakened markets, less access to affordable coverage and care, and the undermining of funding for state Medicaid programs,' wrote Dr. James L. Madara, the group's CEO, in a letter to Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. The doctors group called for bipartisan cooperation, starting with action to shore up shaky insurance markets. 'Senators from both sides of the aisle have expressed interest in pursuing remedies to stabilize the individual market and foster greater availability and choice of health plans. We urge Congress to take this initial step,' the letter said. The AMA has about a quarter-million members. The Congressional Budget Office said Thursday that McConnell's latest bill would produce 22 million additional uninsured people by 2026 and drive up premiums for many older Americans. Congress' nonpartisan fiscal analyst said Wednesday the repeal-only bill would mean 32 million additional uninsured people over a decade and average premiums doubling. The AMA letter said the group is willing to work with Congress to address longer terms goals such as unsustainable trends in health care costs.
  • No scripts have been written, not even an outline. But HBO's announcement on Wednesday that the creator-showrunners of 'Game of Thrones' will follow up that massive hit with an HBO series in which slavery remains legal in the modern-day South drew fire on social media from those who fear that telling that story will glorify racism. The series, 'Confederate,' will take place in an alternate timeline where the southern states have successfully seceded from the Union and formed a nation in which legalized slavery has evolved into a modern institution. The story follows 'a broad swath of characters on both sides of the Mason-Dixon Demilitarized Zone,' HBO said — 'freedom fighters, slave hunters, politicians, abolitionists, journalists, the executives of a slave-holding conglomerate and the families of people in their thrall.' It is not expected to start production for at least a year. 'Confederate' will be created and written by 'Game of Thrones' masterminds David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, who will also serve as showrunners on the series. Both are white. HBO's announcement also said they would join forces with Malcolm Spellman ('Empire,' the forthcoming 'Foxy Brown') and Nichelle Tramble Spellman ('Justified,' ''The Good Wife'), husband-and-wife TV veterans who both are black and who will be fellow executive producers and writers on the new series. 'This is not going to be, you know, the big 'Gone With the Wind' mansion,' Nichelle Tramble Spellman told Vulture in an interview with the entire creative team that was posted Thursday night to address the backlash. 'This is present day, or close to present day, and how the world would have evolved if the South had been successful seceding from the Union.' She said what excited her about the project is 'the idea that in order to build this, we would have to rebuild world history: 'OK, if this had happened here, how did the rest of the world change?'' Other series have imagined uncomfortable alternate versions of history, notably Amazon's 'The Man in the High Castle,' which depicts life in the United States had the Nazis won World War II. But slavery in the United States is a far more sensitive and lingering issue. Malcolm Spellman's take on it: 'You're dealing with weapons-grade material here.' But he said he and his wife 'are not props being used to protect someone else. We are people who feel a need to address issues the same way they do..' Weiss called slavery 'our original sin as a nation. And history doesn't disappear. ... It's an ugly and a painful history, but we all think this is a reason to talk about it, not a reason to run from it. And this feels like a potentially valuable way to talk about it.' Benioff added, 'I'd say anyone who thinks that Malcolm and Nichelle are props have never met Malcolm and Nichelle.
  • Colorado's Canyons of the Ancients National Monument has been removed from a list of national monuments under review for possible elimination or reduction, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said Friday. The monument is the third Zinke has removed from a review of 27 national monuments ordered by President Donald Trump. Trump said monument designations imposed by previous presidents amounted to 'a massive federal land grab' that 'should never have happened.' Monument designations protect federal land from energy development and other activities. When he and Trump launched the review, 'we absolutely realized that not all monuments are the same and that not all monuments would require modifications,' Zinke said. Canyons of the Ancients, which covers 178,000 acres is southwestern Colorado, is 'gorgeous land,' Zinke said, adding that its Native American archaeological sites were even more important. The site spans thousands of years, and Zinke said federal protections 'will help us preserve this site for a thousand more years.' Last week, Zinke removed two other monuments, in Idaho and Washington state, from his review of monuments created since 1996. A full report is due next month. Twenty-four other national monuments, mostly in the West, face curtailing or elimination of protections put in place over the past two decades by presidents from both parties. Monuments under review include Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante in Utah, Nevada's Basin and Range and Katahdin Woods and Waters in Maine. Zinke toured the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in Oregon over the weekend and is expected to visit other monuments before making a recommendation on whether the monuments should be abolished or resized. Kate Kelly, a former Interior official under President Barack Obama, said Zinke's decision to remove the three monuments was welcome but appeared arbitrary. 'While it's good news that Zinke has decided these three national monuments can live to see another day, it underscores that the fate of 24 more monuments rests in the hands of a process without logic or transparency,' said Kelly, public lands director at the Center for American Progress, a liberal-leaning think tank. Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo. hailed Zinke's action, saying he repeatedly urged him not to change the monument's designation. 'Coloradans cherish our state's public lands, and I'm thrilled the Department of the Interior listened to Coloradans and will make no changes to Canyons of the Ancients National Monument's designation,' Gardner said.
  • A senior Iranian official is accusing the United States of not living up to its side of the nuclear agreement that Washington and five other world powers signed with Tehran, saying it is trying 'scare off' foreign companies from doing business with the Islamic Republic. Iranian Deputy Foreign Minister Abbas Araghchi says his country 'maintains its right to react' to the alleged bad U.S. behavior. Araghchi spoke to reporters Friday after a review of the pact by the seven nations that signed it. The move comes at a time of high tensions between Tehran and Washington that threaten the nuclear pact's continued existence. The U.S. administration announced new, non-nuclear sanctions this week and warned Tehran it would face consequences for breaching 'the spirit' of the nuclear deal with world powers.
  • Ratings agency Standard & Poor's has raised its outlook for Greece from 'stable' to 'positive,' encouraged by a recent round of cost-cutting reforms and an expected return to growth this year. But the agency fell short of upgrading its credit rating on the country, keeping it at B-, which remains in so-called 'junk status' territory. In a statement Friday, S&P said the revision reflects an expectation that Greece's debts and debt servicing costs will 'gradually decline' on the back of the economic recovery, the fiscal measures planned through 2020 and the commitment of bailout lenders to provide additional debt relief. Greece is hoping to tap bond market investors for only the second time since it was first bailed out in 2010, following the recent deal with creditors to restart loans.
  • The Los Angeles County coroner confirmed Friday that Linkin Park frontman Chester Bennington died by hanging. Coroner's office spokesman Ed Winter says the 41-year-old rocker hanged himself from a bedroom door in his home near Los Angeles. Bennington was found dead Thursday. Winter says a half-empty bottle of alcohol was found in the room, but no drugs were evident. Bennington struggled with drug and alcohol addictions at various times during his life. A suicide note was not found. An autopsy has not yet been scheduled. Bennington was one of two lead vocalists for Linkin Park, who became one of the most commercially successful acts of the 2000s. They won countless awards, including Grammys, and their hits include 'In the End,' ''What I've Done' and 'Numb.
  • Hackers who breached a Kansas Department of Commerce data system in March had access to more than 5.5 million Social Security numbers in 10 states, along with another 805,000 accounts that didn't include the Social Security numbers, according to records obtained from the agency. The department will be required to pay for credit monitoring for most of the victims of the hacking, according to records obtained through an open records request by the Kansas News Service (http://bit.ly/2gQcgoq ). Besides Kansas, the other states affected by the hack are Arkansas, Arizona, Delaware, Idaho, Maine, Oklahoma, Vermont, Alabama and Illinois. The suspicious activity was discovered March 12 by America's Job Link Alliance-TS, the commerce department division that operates the system. It was isolated March 14 and the FBI was contacted the next day, according to testimony from agency officials to the Legislature this spring. The Kansas News Service filed its open records request May 24 and the commerce department fulfilled the request Wednesday. A commerce department representative didn't immediately return a call Friday from The Associated Press seeking comment. The data is from websites that help people find jobs, such as Kansasworks.com, where people can post resumes and search job openings. At the time of the hack, Kansas was managing data for 16 states but not all the states were affected. After the hack, AJLA-TS officials called in a third-party IT company specializing in forensic analysis to verify the coding error the hackers exploited was fixed and to identify victims. The documents show the commerce department also contracted with private companies to help victims, provide IT support and to provide legal services. The state is paying $175,000 to the law firm and $60,000 to the IT firm. The commerce department didn't provide the cost of the third contract. Earlier testimony to lawmakers indicated a fourth company, Texas-based Denim Group, was contracted in April to review code and provide advice for improvements, which has since been implemented. The agency didn't provide documents related to that contract. Kansas will pay for up to a year of credit monitoring services for victims in nine of the affected states. Delaware residents are eligible for three years of services because of contractual obligations to that state. The agency said in May this was the first known breach of AJLA-TS' databases and the contractor's response exceeded requirements in Kansas law. However, the commerce department said it had sent about 260,000 emails to victims but couldn't contact all victims because it didn't have their email addresses. Kansas law does not require notification to the victims via post or telephone, the department said. The call center for victims, which can be reached at (844) 469-3939, will remain open through the end of July.
  • The surprise attack came before dawn. An Islamic State group militant emerged from underground right into a deserted building being used as a position by U.S.-backed Syrian forces on a front line in Raqqa. He screamed, Allahu akbar, or 'God is great,' and threw a bomb, killing a guard. More militants burst out of the tunnel, raced up to the top floor and killed three fighters, capturing the building and the battling for hours with other fighters from the Syrian Democratic Forces. More than a week after the battle, described to The Associated Press by SDF fighters and commanders, IS militants still hold the building on Raqqa's western side, their snipers face to face with the SDF snipers meters away. While AP visited the site, an airstrike hit the top of the building, yet soon after, an IS sniper there opened fire — a burst of bullets to proclaim that he had survived. Now in its seventh week, the assault to recapture the northern Syrian city of Raqqa from IS militants has ground down into a bloody battle of attrition from street to street, each trying to draw out and weaken the other. Having prepared for months, the militants have put up stiff resistance, using an extensive network of tunnels to strike behind their enemies, deploying land mines and suicide bombers and slowing the SDF advance. 'They are like rats. They pop up from underground and then disappear again,' said one SDF fighter on a frontline on the eastern side of the old city, which has become the focus on the battle. The militants in Raqqa have used civilians as human shields to an even great extent than they did in the Iraqi city od Mosul, said U.S. Army Col. Ryan Dillon, the spokesman for the U.S.-led coalition fighting the Islamic State group. He said they had posted children outside a workshop where they manufacture car bombs to prevent airstrikes. Warplanes did not target the factory, but were able to hit the car bombs later after they drove away from the area where they children were, he said. 'We know this is not going to be an easy fight,' he said. Dillon said the SDF is still making steady advances, but acknowledged a slower pace than the first two weeks of the operation, which saw quick and immediate progress. Several weeks ago, the SDF — which is dominated by Syrian Kurdish forces with a mix of Sunni Arab militias and a Christian faction — made a swift and surprising advance, breaking through the historic wall that surrounds the old center of Raqqa. Since then, the advance has been at a crawl, a few hundred meters. Dillon said the area now held by the militants in the old city is about two kilometers (1.2 miles) across from east to west. The fighting along with U.S. airstrikes have raised fears for the 30,000-50,000 civilians believed to be still trapped in IS-held parts of the city. Since the assault began, 293 civilians have been killed, along with 416 IS fighters and 192 SDF fighters, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, which monitors the conflict. One Kurdish commander on the eastern front said IS militants try to sneak in among civilians, wearing suicide belts. They also send car bombs to the front line and move between homes through holes in the walls to avoid detection. He said a few days ago his fighters discovered a 6-meter (yard) deep tunnel before the old wall that led to neighborhoods on the outskirts of the city. 'The enemy is always coming to us. We have to be always prepared to attack,' said the commander, who requested to be identified by his nom de guerre Ciya, a traditional practice in the YPG, the Kurdish militia that forms the backbone of the SDF. Minutes later as he spoke, a couple of rounds of mortars hit near a house where his troops have their command center. The militants also exploit the differences in quality among the Kurdish and Arab forces that make up the SDF. The Arab militias, made up of tribal fighters, are less disciplined than the Kurds, who are better trained and more experienced. In one place, IS militants have focused on Arab positions in their counterattacks. At one point they were able to retake the al-Sanaa district in eastern Raqqa. An Arab militia called the Elite Forces had to pull back from their position at an entrance to the old city, a strategic point that had been key to the advances so far. The Elite Forces were 'unable to keep up with IS,' Ciya said. Snipers are deployed from both sides along fragile front lines, with fighters sometimes holding positions only 150 meters (yards) apart. IS militants fire unguided mortars toward SDF positions and often appear behind enemy lines. Civilians have attempted to flee and were caught between IS fire and coalition artillery. 'More than anything, it is a war of attrition. They are making traps everywhere and they want us to come to them,' said Abjar, a field commander with the Syriac Military Council, an Assyrian militia that is part of the SDF. He spoke on condition he also be identified only by one name to protect his identity from militant reprisals. Also unlike Mosul, the battle for Raqqa is complicated by the tension between Turkey and Syria's Kurdish fighters. Turkish troops and allied Syrian fighters have shelled Afrin, a Kurdish area in western Syria. That has raised the possibility that Kurdish fighters at Raqqa could redeploy there, weakening the campaign against IS. Dillon, of the coalition, said the friction 'does cause concern to the coalition because our focus is clearly on Raqqa.' But so far, he said there has been no change in the number of forces.