ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
79°
Mostly Clear
H 88° L 68°
  • cloudy-day
    79°
    Current Conditions
    Mostly Clear. H 88° L 68°
  • clear-day
    88°
    Today
    Mostly Clear. H 88° L 68°
  • clear-day
    88°
    Tomorrow
    Mostly Clear. H 88° L 68°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Entertainment

    Bernie Casey, a professional football player turned poet, painter and actor known for parts in films such as 'Revenge of the Nerds' and 'I'm Gonna Git You Sucka,' has died. He was 78. Casey died Tuesday in Los Angeles after a brief illness, his talent agent Erin Connor said. Born in West Virginia in 1939 and raised in Columbus, Ohio, Casey excelled in track and field and football and attended Bowling Green State University on an athletic scholarship. He went on to play wide receiver for the San Francisco 49ers and Los Angeles Rams before going back to his alma mater to get a master's degree in fine arts. For Casey, the arts always came first. He painted and published books of poetry, but the football association that he viewed as a stepping stone followed him. 'It was just a gig,' he told the Washington Post in 1977 about football. 'But it limits the way people perceive you. That can be frustrating. People have tremendous combinations of talents. A man can be a deep-sea diver and also make china.' His art in particular captivated many famous minds, including Maya Angelou. 'His art makes my road less rocky, and my path less crooked,' Angelou said of a 2003 exhibit of his works. 'I was a big, agile, fast and a dedicated athlete,' Casey said in 1999. 'But I always wanted to be a painter.' Casey's professional acting career began with 'Guns of the Magnificent Seven,' a sequel to 'The Magnificent Seven,' in 1969. He appeared in some 35 films, including 'Boxcar Bertha,' ''The Man Who Fell to Earth,' ''Brian's Song' and 'Never Say Never Again.' Casey also starred opposite fellow NFL veteran Jim Brown in '...tick...tick...tick' and 'Black Gunn.' He played Lamda Lamda Lamda head U.N. Jefferson in 'Revenge of the Nerds' and John Slade in Keenan Ivory Wayans' Blaxploitation parody 'I'm Gonna Git You Sucka' from 1988. He also had a number of television credits including 'Star Trek: Deep Space Nine,' ''Murder She Wrote' and 'L.A. Law.
  • Breakfast Club' actor Anthony Michael Hall has pleaded no contest to shoving a neighbor who fell and broke his wrist. The 49-year-old Hall entered the plea in Los Angeles County Superior Court on Wednesday to one misdemeanor count of assault likely to produce injury. He was immediately sentenced to 40 hours of community service and three years of informal probation. Prosecutors say Hall and a next-door neighbor in Playa Del Rey got into an argument in September 2016 that ended with Hall pushing the man to the ground. Hall was a staple of early 1980s teen movies including 'The Breakfast Club' and 'Sixteen Candles.' He more recently appeared in 'The Dark Knight' and the TV series 'The Dead Zone.
  • The Latest on the Kevin Hart scandal (all times local): 11:18 a.m. A lawyer for a woman involved in the Kevin Hart scandal says someone secretly placed cameras in his Las Vegas hotel suite and made bedroom images of the two. Lawyer Lisa Bloom told a Los Angeles press conference Wednesday that her client, Montia Sabbag (mahn-tee-uh suh-bahg), is a victim and Hart appears to be a victim as well. Bloom says Sabbag is neither suing Hart nor demanding any money from the box-office star. The attorney says there's no evidence that law enforcement is looking into the matter so she will immediately report the situation to authorities and seek a full investigation. Sabbag says she's not an extortionist and has nothing to do with the recordings. Hart publicly brought up the matter last weekend in an Instagram video in which he apologized to his family and said someone was trying to seek financial gain from a mistake he made. ___ 10:30 a.m. A woman has come forward to say she was involved with Kevin Hart a month ago but she is not an extortionist. Montia Sabbag (mahn-tee-uh suh-bahg) spoke to reporters at her lawyer's Los Angeles office Wednesday following Hart's weekend apology to his pregnant wife and children via an Instagram video for what he called an error in judgment. He also said someone was trying to seek financial gain from his mistake and he'd rather confess than let that happen. Sabbag says that since her involvement with Hart, her name and pictures have become public and lies have been written about her. She says she's a recording artist and actress, and hasn't broken any laws. Sabbag also mentioned unspecified recordings but says she had nothing to do with them.
  • Green has been declared the color of Milan Fashion Week, with the fashion chamber promoting sustainability in the trend-driven world of ready-to-wear. Eleven awards will be handed out Sunday evening to honor Italian designers, fashion houses and suppliers that 'champion community and social justice, traditional craftsmanship, responsible supply chain management and innovation and technological transformation.' Milan Fashion Week previews for womenswear looks for next spring and summer, the highlight of the annual fashion calendar, feature 159 collections. The weeklong fashion celebration kicked off with Gucci, No. 21 and Fausto Puglisi and Angel Chen. Some highlights from Wednesday's first day of shows: ___ GREEN FASHION AWARDS Livia Firth, the wife of actor Colin Firth, is presiding over the first Green Fashion Awards, fittingly dubbed the Fashion Oscars, later in the week at the La Scala opera house. Asked what consumers can do to promote sustainability in fashion, she candidly said: 'Buy less,' short for eschew fast-fashion for quality. Italian Fashion Chamber president Carlo Capasa has been promoting sustainability, urging fashion houses to adopt a code that addresses such issues as water use and green investments. He acknowledged that the industry in general is 'not at all' sustainable at the moment. 'That is why we are promoting this,' he said. The uphill image battle was evident at a protest outside the city's main Duomo Cathedral, where animal rights activists demonstrated against the use of animal fur in Milan collections. _____ GUCCI'S ROCKET MAN In a news cycle dominated by U.S. President Donald Trump's threats against North Korea and references to its leader as 'Rocket Man,' it was certainly prescient that Alessandro Michele not only included a suit fitting of a rocket man for his latest Gucci collection, but dedicated a capsule collection to Elton John, whose hits include the pop song of the same name. For the rocket man, there were oversized teardrop-shaped shoulders on a pink jumpsuit with yellow stars. Since his Gucci solo debut in 2015, Michele has maintained a profile as the Milan fashion world's darling and innovator. Marco Bizzarri, the brand's towering CEO, said backstage that 'Alessandro has the capacity to evolve while always maintaining a very clear line.' 'There is a lot of joy. A lot of energy. That is the best part,' he said. ___ MICHELE'S 'DISSENTING SPIRIT' Michele's collections have had in common a growing element of self-consciousness. The designer inserts alienating elements in the same way that the German poet and playwright Bertolt Brecht sought to remind audiences that they were witnessing a stage production and not be swept away by fantasy. Judging by the crowd in attendance, the philosophy is winning not just fans but adherents. One male fashionista wore a golden mask echoing a previous season's masked alien. The collection, combining both men's and women's looks, was shown under strobe lights and amid copies of classic statuary including from ancient Egypt, the Mayans and the Greeks. Michele says he wanted to underline that his view of the contemporary derives from myriad stories of the past. The strobe lights helped narrowed the focus to shapes and sparkles: A disco-inspired handkerchief skirt with a golden and silvery sequin top, and red-white-and-blue satiny jumpsuit that could help power an Evel Knievel-wannabe It's a collection, as the notes assert, for 'the dissenting spirit.' ____ AUSPICIOUS 21 AT No. 21 Alessandro Dell'Acqua celebrated his 21 years in the fashion business with 21 sheer opening looks for his No. 21 fashion brand. Dell'Acqua gorgeously combined sheers, feather elements and athletically accented knitwear to project a feminine strength, underlining the mood by closing to the sound of Pat Benatar's 'Love is a Battlefield.' The designer characteristically included masculine elements such as the checked patterns on skirts, jackets and slim knee-length trousers. The accessory of choice: An unattached hood for all occasions. A range of neatly gathered, draped and tiered dresses and skirts accented with sheer sequins or feathery wisps — and done up in a color palette of sheer pinks, nudes and yellows — underlined the prettiness of the collection. Cropped sweaters lent an edge, as did stronger color combos of light blue, red and black with some leopard accents on sleeker silhouettes, including pencil skirts and bra tops. ____ TWO BY TWO FOR ANGEL CHEN Shanghai-based designer Angel Chen combines Asian storytelling with technical prowess and materials in her latest collection. It was the 25-year-old designer's second collection for her unisex brand to preview during Milan Fashion Week. This time, it was part of the main lineup with the support of the Italian fashion chamber. 'We want to break boundaries,' the designer said backstage. Inspired by a futuristic Noah's Ark tale, Chen's masterful two-by-two pairings included a women's suit with flared cropped trousers alongside a man's trench — both made out of bespoke Korean technical fabric that gave the impression of a shiny baby pink but on closer inspection was a combination of tones. The designer referenced a host of animals destined for the ark, including tigers, cranes and insects that appeared in the shape of large backpacks. Many of the looks were sporty — black and red body suits — or technical, as in the diaphanous floor-length anoraks. Prints that featured tigers and crocodiles among other animals represented Asian allegories, Chen said. 'I would say the shape is contemporary, but the meaning is more cultural,' she said. _____ FEMININITY REFUGE AT PUGLISI Fausto Puglisi took a nostalgic view of femininity for his latest collection, showing black and white lace and linen combinations that harkened back to another era. Puglisi's focus was less on seduction and more on an intimate fragility. 'She doesn't need to show off her strength with her look,' the designer said. 'Because she thinks true strength is to take refuge in a book.' The collection was strong on white with black and floral accents, including long linen dresses with lace inserts, or shorter slip dresses with long, ruffle cuffs. Silky robe dresses finished in trailing fringe, while pale tulle skirts created a feminine silhouette.
  • Lillian Ross, the ever-watchful New Yorker reporter whose close narrative style defined a memorable and influential 70-year career, including a revealing portrait of Ernest Hemingway, a classic Hollywood expose and a confession to an adulterous affair, has died at age 99. Ross died early Wednesday at Lenox Hill Hospital after suffering a stroke, New Yorker articles editor Susan Morrison said Wednesday. In an email statement to The Associated Press, New Yorker editor David Remnick called Ross a groundbreaking writer. 'Lillian would knock my block off for saying so, she'd find it pretentious, but she really was a pioneer, both as a woman writing at The New Yorker and as a truly innovative artist, someone who helped change and shape non-fiction writing in English,' Remnick wrote. Hundreds of Ross' 'Talk of the Town' dispatches appeared in The New Yorker, starting in the 1940s when she wrote about Harry Truman's years as a haberdasher, and continuing well into the 21st century, whether covering a book party at the Friars Club, or sitting with the daughters of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II as they watched a Broadway revival of 'South Pacific.' After the death of J.D. Salinger in 2010, Ross wrote a piece about her friendship with the reclusive novelist and former New Yorker contributor. Her methods were as crystallized and instinctive as her writing. She hated tape recorders ('fast, easy and lazy'), trusted first impressions and believed in the 'mystical force' that 'makes the work seem delightfully easy and natural and supremely enjoyable.' 'It's sort of like having sex,' she once wrote. Ross' approach, later made famous by the 'New Journalists' of the 1960s, used dialogue, scene structure and other techniques associated with fiction writers. She regarded herself as a short story writer who worked with facts, or even as a director, trying to 'build scenes into little story-films.' In 1999, her 1964 collection of articles, 'Reporting,' was selected by a panel of experts as one of the 100 best examples of American journalism in the 20th century. The group, assembled by New York University, ranked it No. 66. 'She is the mistress of selective listening and viewing, of capturing the one moment that entirely illumines the scene, of fastening on the one quote that Tells All,' novelist Irving Wallace wrote in a 1966 New York Times review of her work. Short and curly-haired, unimposing and patient, Ross tried her best to let the stories speak for themselves, but at times the writer interrupted. In the late 1940s, Hemingway came to New York for shopping and socializing and Ross joined him as he drank champagne with Marlene Dietrich, bought a winter coat and visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art, flask in hand. She presented the author as a volatile bulk of bluster and insecurity, speaking in telegraphic shorthand ('You want to go with me to buy coat?') and even punching himself in the stomach to prove his muscle. Ross was friendly with Hemingway — she liked most of her subjects — but her article was criticized, and welcomed, as humanizing a legend. 'Lillian Ross wrote a profile of me which I read, in proof, with some horror,' Hemingway later recalled. 'But since she was a friend of mine and I knew that she was not writing in malice she had a right to make me seem that way if she wished.' Not long after, Ross went to Hollywood to report on director John Huston as he worked on an adaptation of Stephen Crane's Civil War novel 'The Red Badge of Courage.' She soon realized that the movie was more interesting than any one person: She was witness to a disaster. Ross' reports in The New Yorker, released in 1952 as the book 'Picture,' were an unprecedented chronicle of studio meddling as MGM took control of the film and hacked it to 70 minutes. Praised by Hemingway among others, 'Picture' was a direct influence on such future Hollywood authors as John Gregory Dunne ('Studio') and anticipated the nonfiction novel that Truman Capote perfected a decade later with 'In Cold Blood.' Huston's daughter, actress Anjelica Huston, became a lifelong friend. 'My parents loved and respected her, and trusted her. She was, they would say, different from other reporters,' Huston wrote in the foreword to the book's 50th anniversary edition. Deeply private even around her New Yorker colleagues, Ross did step out in 1998 when she published 'Here But Not Here,' a surprising and explicit memoir of her long-rumored, 40-year liaison with New Yorker editor William Shawn, a mating of secret souls allegedly consummated in a bedroom once used by Dietrich as a clothes closet. 'We were drawn to each other from the first by all the elusive forces that people have been trying to pin down from the beginning of time,' Ross wrote. William Shawn had died six years earlier, but his widow was still alive when the book was published, leading New York Times writer (and former New Yorker deputy editor) Charles McGrath to call it 'a cruel betrayal of the Shawns' much-valued privacy — a tactless example of the current avidity for tell-all confessions.' While involved with Shawn, Ross adopted a son, Erik, who in later years would accompany his mother on assignments. Her New Yorker work was compiled in several books, most recently 'Reporting Always.' Born in Syracuse, New York, she was always more comfortable as an observer and played hooky just to hang around professional newspaper offices. She graduated from Hunter College, worked at the liberal New York City daily PM, then was hired by The New Yorker in the mid-1940s, when the magazine was looking for women writers because so many men were serving in World War II. 'We have sent her on stories ranging from in subject matter from politics to uplift brassieres, and she's done splendidly by both,' PM editor Peggy Wright Weidman wrote to Shawn. 'Another baffler is that she likes to work and does so, at any hour of the day, night, or weekend, with concentration and no nonsense.
  • On the heels of comedian Kevin Hart's Instagram video about someone seeking financial gain from a mistake he made, a woman came forward Wednesday and said she was 'involved' with the box office star a month ago but is not an extortionist. Montia Sabbag said that since images of her became public she has been the subject of lies. 'I am not an extortionist. I'm not a stripper. I'm a recording artist and an actress, and I have not broken any laws. I had nothing to do with these recordings,' Sabbag said, adding that she was sorry for any involvement. Her attorney, Lisa Bloom, said someone secretly placed cameras in Hart's Las Vegas hotel suite and recorded 'bedroom images' of the pair and disseminated them. 'Montia is therefore the victim of multiple felonies under state and federal law,' Bloom said. The attorney added that Hart appeared to be a victim as well. Bloom said there was no evidence that law enforcement was looking into the matter and she intended to report it to authorities immediately and demand a full investigation. 'Montia and I are not asking for a cent from Kevin Hart,' the attorney said. 'This is not about money. We are not suing him. We are not making any claims against him. Any reports to the contrary are false. Kevin Hart appears to be the victim of this criminal just as Montia is the victim of this criminal.' Hart publicly apologized to his pregnant wife and his kids on Saturday for what he described as a 'bad error in judgment.' The comedian posted a video to Instagram in which he said he wasn't perfect and recently made poor decisions. He said there were 'no excuses' but added that someone was trying to seek financial gain over his mistakes, and he'd rather confess than let that happen. Hart married wife Eniko last year and she is expecting their first child. He has two children from a previous marriage.
  • Grammy-winning country singer songwriter and producer Rodney Crowell is cancelling all of his remaining 2017 tour dates due to unspecified health issues. In a statement on his website posted Wednesday, Crowell said a team of doctors has advised him to rest and that for the foreseeable future, 'my work will consist of quietly encouraging my body to return to its natural state.' Crowell, 67, was slated to perform at the Americana Honors and Awards in Nashville, Tennessee, on Sept. 13, where he also won an award for song of the year, but he did not attend. The Texas-born artist rose to prominence with his 1998 album 'Diamonds and Dirt,' which yielded five No. 1 country songs including the Grammy-winning, 'After All This Time.
  • Famed painter Jasper Johns is making plans for his rural estate in the Connecticut hills to become an artists' retreat after he's gone. The 87-year-old artist, who has lived and worked in the town of Sharon for the last two decades, received its blessing last week for his property to host as many as two dozen artists at a time to live, share meals together and work on their craft. In the small Litchfield County town, some see his decision as a boost for the lively local arts scene. Art studios dot the town green in the community of some 3,000 people where Johns is a towering if seldom-glimpsed figure. 'I really think that's the best use of that property because it extends his legacy,' First Selectman Brent Colley said. 'A lot of us never see him. He never comes out. But he employs a lot of people and he's been a great asset to the town.' Johns is considered a major influence on pop, minimalist and conceptual art through his work dealing with themes of perception and identity. His textured images of American flags became icons of modern art, and he was honored by President Barack Obama in 2010 with a Presidential Medal of Freedom. The town planning commission approved the proposal last week. A Johns representative sought the exception to zoning rules now because knowing the town's position will help with his estate planning, according to the minutes from last week's hearing. The plan calls for a retreat, set up as a charitable or nonprofit organization, with about 20 employees. The property is a few hundred yards from the town's main marketplace. It consists of six parcels of land, including some with residences. Planners say no additional construction is planned for now although some barns may need to be converted to studios. Besides the property, Johns plans to provide an endowment for the artists retreat. Colley said it is a fitting plan for the property that Johns has acquired and steadily improved in recent years. 'He's done a nice job of renovating and renewing that whole portion of town,' Colley said.
  • The former middleweight champion died Tuesday at a Miami-area hospital from complications of pneumonia, according to his longtime fiancee, Denise Baker. LaMotta handed Sugar Ray Robinson his first defeat and reigned for nearly two years as middleweight champion during a time boxing was one of America's biggest sports. He was a fan favorite who fought with fury, though he admitted to once intentionally losing a fight to get in line for a title bout. LaMotta gained fame with a new generation because of the 1980 film based loosely on his autobiography from a decade earlier. De Niro won an Academy Award playing the troubled boxer — violent both inside and outside the ring — in a Martin Scorsese film that several critics have ranked as among the top 100 movies ever made. 'Rest in Peace, Champ,' De Niro said in a statement. The Bronx Bull, as he was known in his fighting days, compiled an 83-19-4 record with 30 knockouts, in a career that began in 1941 and ended in 1954. But it was the movie that unflinchingly portrayed him as a violent and abusive husband — he was married six times — that is remembered even more. 'I'm no angel,' he said in a 2005 interview with The Associated Press. LaMotta fought the great Sugar Ray Robinson six times, handing Robinson the first defeat of his career in 1943 and losing the middleweight title to him in a storied match on Feb. 14, 1951, at Chicago Stadium. Robinson stopped a bloodied LaMotta in the 13th round of their scheduled 15-round bout in a fight that became known as the second St. Valentine's Day Massacre. It was a reference to the infamous 1929 mob killings of the same name. LaMotta took a beating in the later rounds of the fight, but he refused to go down until the referee stepped in to save him from further punishment. LaMotta finished 1-5 in six fights against Robinson, who many in boxing think was the greatest fighter ever. 'I fought Sugar Ray Robinson so many times it's a wonder I don't have diabetes,' LaMotta was fond of saying. In the fight before he lost the title, LaMotta saved the championship in movie-script fashion against Laurent Dauthuille. Trailing badly on all three scorecards, LaMotta knocked out the challenger with 13 seconds left in the fight. LaMotta threw a fight against Billy Fox, which he admitted in testimony before the Kefauver Committee, a U.S. Senate committee investigating organized crime in 1960. 'I purposely lost a fight to Billy Fox because they promised me that I would get a shot to fight for the title if I did,' LaMotta said in 1970 interview printed in Peter Heller's 1973 book 'In This Corner: 40 World Champions Tell Their Stories.' LaMotta was 'stopped' by Fox in the fourth round on Nov. 14, 1947, in Madison Square Garden. He didn't get a title shot until 10 fights later. On June 16, 1949, in Detroit, he became middleweight champion when the Frenchman Marcel Cerdan couldn't continue after the 10th round. Of the claim that Cerdan had to quit because of a shoulder injury, LaMotta said in 1970: 'Something's bound to happen to you in a tough fight, cut eye, broken nose or broken hand or something like that. So you could make excuses out of anything, you know, but you got to keep on going if you're a champ or you're a contender.' Renowned for his strong chin, and the punishment he could take, and dish out, LaMotta was knocked down only once — in a 1952 loss to light-heavyweight Danny Nardico — in his 106 fights. LaMotta's first defense was supposed to be a rematch with Cerdan, but the Frenchman was killed when a plane en route to the United States crashed in the Azores in 1949. So in his first defense, LaMotta outpointed Tiberio Mitri on July 12, 1950, in New York, then on Sept. 13, he rallied to knock out Dauthuille at Detroit. LaMotta's title reign ended when Robinson stopped him in the 13th round in Chicago, and he fought only sparingly before retiring a few years later. In their second match, on Feb. 5, 1943, in New York, LaMotta won a 10-round decision, giving Robinson his first defeat in the 41st fight of his illustrious career. LaMotta was born July 10, 1922, on New York City's Lower East Side but was raised in the Bronx. After retiring from boxing in 1954, he owned a nightclub for a time in Miami, then dabbled in show business and commercials. He also made personal appearances and for a while in the 1970s he was a host at a topless nightclub in New York. The 1980 film 'Raging Bull,' based on LaMotta's memoir written 10 years earlier, was nominated for eight Academy Awards. Though director Scorsese was passed over, De Niro, who gained 50 pounds to portray the older, heavier LaMotta, won the best actor award. In 1998, LaMotta, who had four daughters, lost both of his sons. Jake LaMotta Jr., 51, died from cancer in February. Joe LaMotta, 49, was killed in plane crash off Nova Scotia in September. A funeral in Miami and a memorial service in New York City are being planned, Baker said. ___ This story has been corrected to show that LaMotta was born in 1922, not 1921.
  • Officials in an upstate New York town are again considering Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Daryl Hall's request to build an outdoor stage at his restaurant and music venue. The Poughkeepsie Journal reports (http://pojonews.co/2f8nQYe ) the town of Pawling Planning Board discussed the project during its meeting this week. Kenneth Stenger, an attorney representing the board, says the discussion centered on the volume of sound live music would produce during outdoor performances at Daryl's House. The Hall & Oates musician's business filed a lawsuit against the town earlier this year, claiming the town's effort to lower the venue's maximum occupancy would force the restaurant to close. William Sayegh, an attorney for Daryl's House, says Hall is working closely with the town to secure approvals for the outdoor expansion. ___ Information from: Poughkeepsie Journal, http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com