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Find the best gas prices with free GasBuddy app

Gas prices: ugh.

If, like most Americans, you drive to work, you've no doubt felt the pinch at the pump.

I don't know about you, but it pains me deeply to put $50, $60, even $70 into my gas tank every week. (And my wife fills up even more often.)

Needless to say, you should always look for the station with the cheapest gas.

Even if you save only 10 or 20 cents per gallon every time you fill up, it adds up.

Ah, but how can you make sure you're getting the best price? Maybe there's a station just around the corner that costs 15 cents less?

There's an app for that: GasBuddy. Available free for Android, BlackBerry, iOS, and Windows Phone, GasBuddy shows you the nearest gas stations and their current prices.

Just tap Find Gas Near Me, and the app lists every station in the vicinity, with prices on Regular, Midgrade, Premium, and Diesel.

You can sort the results by distance or price, ideal for figuring out if it's worth driving a little out of your way to score a better deal.

There's also a Map view, with icons representing each station and a chance to get directions if you're in an unfamiliar area. And if you want to know whether the gas will be cheaper at your destination than it is where you are now, you can search for stations based on city, state, or Zip.

Given the way gas prices fluctuate, and how different they can be from one station to another, it's almost crazy not to use GasBuddy.

With a few taps you can make sure you're getting the lowest price every single time.


Veteran technology writer Rick Broida is the author of numerous books, blogs, and features. He lends his money-saving expertise to CNET and Savings.com, and also writes for PC World and Wired.

(Source: Savings.com)

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